Law School Discussion

Student Sues for More Time in LSAT: Is this fair?

Re: Student Sues for More Time in LSAT: Is this fair?
« Reply #10 on: September 27, 2007, 10:55:21 AM »
So how does is serve the interests of providing for a diversity in law if we require all law applicants, indeterminate of their disabilities on non-critical issues such as timing, to use the same scale? 

Uh, it doesn't?  Since when did diversity in law become the aim of law schools admissions?

Uh, see Grutter v. Bollinger.

Lol, diversity can be one of the concerns, not the primary concern.  I would think the primary concern, both for law schools and for society, is producing capable attorneys. 

Exactly.  Diversity is an allowable aim, not a necessary condition.  (I absolutely support diversity in the classroom, by the way, but as long as we are playing games with flaw questions we could include one about how having someone with ADD in class equates with having a minority in class.)

Re: Student Sues for More Time in LSAT: Is this fair?
« Reply #11 on: September 27, 2007, 11:14:01 AM »
So how does is serve the interests of providing for a diversity in law if we require all law applicants, indeterminate of their disabilities on non-critical issues such as timing, to use the same scale? 

Uh, it doesn't?  Since when did diversity in law become the aim of law schools admissions?

Uh, see Grutter v. Bollinger.

Lol, diversity can be one of the concerns, not the primary concern.  I would think the primary concern, both for law schools and for society, is producing capable attorneys. 

Exactly.  Diversity is an allowable aim, not a necessary condition.  (I absolutely support diversity in the classroom, by the way, but as long as we are playing games with flaw questions we could include one about how having someone with ADD in class equates with having a minority in class.)

As far as diversity goes, how doesn't it?

You really think that's the kind of diversity they are aiming for?  My stock just went up at Yale, then, because I'm sure they will want to include a stupid person like me to balance out all the smart people there.  I mean, all kinds of diversity matter, right?  Maybe I should include something in my application about liking a slice on onion on my grilled cheese sandwiches.  Not many people do that, right?  That's pretty diverse, if you ask me.

cui bono?

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Re: Student Sues for More Time in LSAT: Is this fair?
« Reply #12 on: September 27, 2007, 11:21:44 AM »
onion =/= disability

onion =/= diversity

but maybe u should write about it, I'm sure that would impress adcoms  ::) :D


paratactical

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Re: Student Sues for More Time in LSAT: Is this fair?
« Reply #13 on: September 27, 2007, 11:24:47 AM »
onion =/= disability

onion =/= diversity

but does disability = diversity? I'm divided on the issue, but it seems like that's the core of the question: do we give allowances to those with disabilities because they are disabled or because we want them as an element of a diverse law school class? Or is the disability something we should try, as a civilised society to make accommodations for but not ones as large as not marking the time adjusted scores?

Hannibal

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Re: Student Sues for More Time in LSAT: Is this fair?
« Reply #14 on: September 27, 2007, 11:25:01 AM »
I also have a physical disability.  I am too slow.  No matter how hard I tried, no matter how much I practiced, I could not run the 40 in under 5.5 seconds.  As a receiver in football, the 40 was like the entrance exam that I just couldn't pass.

You have no idea what it is like to lift weights, to take supplements, to train daily to increase my speed only to be absolutely unable to develop the fast twitch muscle fibers that most other receivers were born with.  I can't help my situation, and even worse, my disability has completely excluded me from a job that I had always dreamed of: playing in the NFL.  The most popular sport in the country is woefully underreprentative of the general population.  Allowing people that may not run a 4.3 40 into the league would level the playing field and make the NFL more diverse.

I'm also dyslexic because often when I type "it is" I end up with "t*ts."

Re: Student Sues for More Time in LSAT: Is this fair?
« Reply #15 on: September 27, 2007, 11:32:17 AM »
onion =/= disability

onion =/= diversity

but maybe u should write about it, I'm sure that would impress adcoms  ::) :D



Now minorities are disabled?

cui bono?

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Re: Student Sues for More Time in LSAT: Is this fair?
« Reply #16 on: September 27, 2007, 11:37:42 AM »
onion =/= disability

onion =/= diversity

but does disability = diversity? I'm divided on the issue, but it seems like that's the core of the question: do we give allowances to those with disabilities because they are disabled or because we want them as an element of a diverse law school class? Or is the disability something we should try, as a civilised society to make accommodations for but not ones as large as not marking the time adjusted scores?

I don't think it's one of the major diversity indicators the schools look for.  Race, religion, nat. origion are prolly the big 3.  But perhaps it should be.  I think schools just want to be able to say "hey look how diverse we are".  And I think schools are more sympathetic toward physical disabilities as oppossed to psychological.

onion =/= disability

onion =/= diversity

but maybe u should write about it, I'm sure that would impress adcoms  ::) :D



Now minorities are disabled?

wow. When did I say that?

paratactical

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Re: Student Sues for More Time in LSAT: Is this fair?
« Reply #17 on: September 27, 2007, 11:40:13 AM »
onion =/= disability

onion =/= diversity

but does disability = diversity? I'm divided on the issue, but it seems like that's the core of the question: do we give allowances to those with disabilities because they are disabled or because we want them as an element of a diverse law school class? Or is the disability something we should try, as a civilised society to make accommodations for but not ones as large as not marking the time adjusted scores?

I don't think it's one of the major diversity indicators the schools look for.  Race, religion, nat. origion are prolly the big 3.  But perhaps it should be.  I think schools just want to be able to say "hey look how diverse we are".  And I think schools are more sympathetic toward physical disabilities as oppossed to psychological.



Uh.. isn't ADHD a psychological disorder? I mean, these brain juices and what have you, not slow runners we're talking about.

Re: Student Sues for More Time in LSAT: Is this fair?
« Reply #18 on: September 27, 2007, 11:52:05 AM »
onion =/= disability

onion =/= diversity

but does disability = diversity? I'm divided on the issue, but it seems like that's the core of the question: do we give allowances to those with disabilities because they are disabled or because we want them as an element of a diverse law school class? Or is the disability something we should try, as a civilised society to make accommodations for but not ones as large as not marking the time adjusted scores?

I don't think it's one of the major diversity indicators the schools look for.  Race, religion, nat. origion are prolly the big 3.  But perhaps it should be.  I think schools just want to be able to say "hey look how diverse we are".  And I think schools are more sympathetic toward physical disabilities as oppossed to psychological.



Uh.. isn't ADHD a psychological disorder? I mean, these brain juices and what have you, not slow runners we're talking about.

Brain functions are not physical?

paratactical

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Re: Student Sues for More Time in LSAT: Is this fair?
« Reply #19 on: September 27, 2007, 11:53:34 AM »
onion =/= disability

onion =/= diversity

but does disability = diversity? I'm divided on the issue, but it seems like that's the core of the question: do we give allowances to those with disabilities because they are disabled or because we want them as an element of a diverse law school class? Or is the disability something we should try, as a civilised society to make accommodations for but not ones as large as not marking the time adjusted scores?

I don't think it's one of the major diversity indicators the schools look for.  Race, religion, nat. origion are prolly the big 3.  But perhaps it should be.  I think schools just want to be able to say "hey look how diverse we are".  And I think schools are more sympathetic toward physical disabilities as oppossed to psychological.



Uh.. isn't ADHD a psychological disorder? I mean, these brain juices and what have you, not slow runners we're talking about.

Brain functions are not physical?

But then aren't all psychological disorders physical disorders?

I mean, where does one draw the line?