Law School Discussion

For the older students...

aerynn

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Re: For the older students...
« Reply #90 on: April 07, 2006, 06:19:45 PM »
Actually, I was thinking of Emory as a great example of a school that fosters social interaction and networking without pushing the alcohol so much.  They do food club there where everyone goes out to restaurants together.  Yes, those places server alcohol and people probably choose to drink.  I think combining it with food, instead of just a keg out of a restaurant context, not only facilitates more real interaction and relationship building, but also seems to encourage a drink or two with dinner, more than binge drinking.

Beyond the larger problem of alcohol in American society, lawyers as a profession have a real problem with alcohol abuse because it is an attempt to self-medicate for depression and stress relief.  If schools and peers advocate getting drunk to relax after a tough week, as a reward for another week "survived," or a way to get over the depressing events of the week, I think the school is missing an opportunity to teach more than just the law, but how to truly be a lawyer and deal with all the stress and depression that the profession in heir to.

Emory's food club actually is a great example of a way to foster going out, having fun, blowing off steam, networking with other students, profs, and students in other grad schools, and allowing drinking in an adult context, not just putting a keg in the quad.

laurrk

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Re: For the older students...
« Reply #91 on: April 07, 2006, 06:33:53 PM »
My ex-BF is a 3L now, and some of his friends are hard-core drinkers. They all celebrate not having class on Fridays by getting plastered on Thursday night. What bothers me more than the getting wasted itself is the drinking and driving that I know must also occur. If you're going to drink, drink responsibly.

laurrk

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Re: For the older students...
« Reply #92 on: April 07, 2006, 06:46:47 PM »
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Thanks for the PSA!

the what?

Re: For the older students...
« Reply #93 on: April 07, 2006, 06:49:10 PM »
I wish this board had existed when I was getting ready to go to LS!  I was in my early 30s when I started (class of 1998), and I remember calling all around to locate people who had gone to LS when they were older.  Fortunately, I found one who was very helpful, but it would have been great to have a place like this where I could have asked all the questions that nagged me.

Anyway, what I found was that there were many young students who were very mature and gracious, and a lesser number who were wrapped up in their cliques and didn't know how to relate to anyone over the age of 24.  Most of the time, the kids didn't make an issue out of age if I didn't.

Generally, I would recommend trying to be welcoming and nice as much as possible, because you never know when you may need to ask one of your former classmates for a favor.  Life and law have a way of bringing you back into contact with that kid two rows over who always wore a baseball cap backwards in class and never said hello when he passed you in town.

One other piece of advice would be to join your school's older law students club.  (Most schools seem to have one.)  Some of my best friends in LS I met through that club.  And seek out the mature students, regardless of age. 

laurrk

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Re: For the older students...
« Reply #94 on: April 07, 2006, 06:54:44 PM »
Oh, duh.

I didn't mean to be preachy. When I was in high school there was a horrible fatal accident that killed a graduating senior and left another with a traumatic brain injury. One of the girls was literally burned to death, trapped under a Jeep. And guess what?  The driver (who escaped injury) was drunk. So drinking and driving is a pet peeve of mine. And I can see immature high schoolers driving drunk, but I figure that once you're in law school you're old enough to know better. Take turns, it's not that hard.

OK, rant over.


curry2lt99

Re: For the older students...
« Reply #95 on: April 07, 2006, 07:11:02 PM »
all,
I just got out of the Air Force after 6 years. In ROTC, all the old guys tell ya how you've GOT to join the Officer's Club and go drinking on Fridays, and you've GOT to have a beer when the Beer Light comes on Friday's in the fighter squadron.  None of this was true though. I have never drank alcohol in my life and I didn't want to start in the AF.  What I found was that most people were cool and respectful about my beliefs as long as I respected them. Even F-16 pilots, the most notorious of the bunch. So, I don't expect to have to worry too much about it in law school either. Give people a chance - they'll surprise you. Just my 2 cents.

HippieLawChick

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Re: For the older students...
« Reply #96 on: April 08, 2006, 06:52:25 AM »
"Emory's food club actually is a great example of a way to foster going out, having fun, blowing off steam, networking with other students, profs, and students in other grad schools, and allowing drinking in an adult context, not just putting a keg in the quad."

For some people, being invited out to eat fat laden food is more dangerous than going to cocktail hour.  So you see, you can argue against anything.

I don't think that having cocktails is bad, or that this means someone is encouraging drinking.  Soft drinks are available everywhere.  Adults drink, and most of them do it responsibly. 

laurrk

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Re: For the older students...
« Reply #97 on: April 08, 2006, 07:01:54 AM »
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Beyond the larger problem of alcohol in American society, lawyers as a profession have a real problem with alcohol abuse because it is an attempt to self-medicate for depression and stress relief.

Maybe if there weren't questions about mental health on the bar exam (at least in certain states), people would be more likely to seek therapy as opposed to self-medicating. Lawyers and law students have very high rates of depression, but who wants to see a therapist just to have someone pry into your personal life when it comes time to apply for the bar?

HippieLawChick

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Re: For the older students...
« Reply #98 on: April 09, 2006, 05:44:15 PM »
I thought they only ask if you have been committed to an institution, not if you sought help or counseling. 

I am going to look into this.  Any idea of which states ask, and whether they can refuse bar admission for it?  I have a close friend who sought help for depression in college.  If she couldn't get admitted over that, I would sue the *&^% out of the bar for discrimination.  They don't ban you for having a heart condition, and shouldn't over you getting treatment for this medical condition. 

laurrk

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Re: For the older students...
« Reply #99 on: April 09, 2006, 06:33:06 PM »
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I thought they only ask if you have been committed to an institution, not if you sought help or counseling.

I am going to look into this.  Any idea of which states ask, and whether they can refuse bar admission for it?  I have a close friend who sought help for depression in college.  If she couldn't get admitted over that, I would sue the sh*t out of the bar for discrimination.  They don't ban you for having a heart condition, and shouldn't over you getting treatment for this medical condition.

Hippie, you should check out this link:
http://www.abanet.org/irr/hr/winter97/welobob.html

The article is from 1997, so I'm not sure exactly how current it is, but it certainly scares me. Like your friend, I also have been treated for depression (that would be the reason for my messed up undergrad career, which involved me transferring three times before finally graduating). It really pisses me off that I might be penalized for seeking treatment for an illness that runs in my family, just like diabetes or heart disease runs in families. And certainly I will be a much better law student, and then a much better lawyer, if I continue to seek the treatment that I need to stay depression-free.