Law School Discussion

Choice of major & LSAT/Law School success

redemption

Re: Choice of major & LSAT/Law School success
« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2006, 03:51:20 PM »
Well maybe your undergraduate school didnt have a mathematical approach to economics, but most well respected schools do...

Sorry. My school invented the mathematical approach to economics. JS  ;)

Re: Choice of major & LSAT/Law School success
« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2006, 03:53:10 PM »
I dont mean to get snippy....But the economics courses i have taken at Cornell have, for the most part, been calculus courses...We even used Linear Algebra in one of our microeconomics courses.  SO anyway, im just making the point that not all undergraduate economics is easy.  English Lit is a very respectable major, and as a student with a philosophy concentration, I view that as a very relevant course of study.

Re: Choice of major & LSAT/Law School success
« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2006, 03:54:38 PM »
Well I can believe that your graduate school may have invented it, but apparently such instruction has not filtered down into undergraduate teaching, which was the point I was making.

Re: Choice of major & LSAT/Law School success
« Reply #13 on: February 22, 2006, 03:57:21 PM »
Yes redemption, ECON 101 is very easy.  If you haven't been through the many upper-level ECON classes then you really have no room to form an opinion on the matter.  There is a reason why Economics is a well-respected major by law schools--if it were "trivially easy", then it wouldnt get that kind of respect, would it?  

There's more to it than the supply and demand you learn with all the other kids who are required to take it as an elective.  This semester alone I'm taking Econometrics and Game Theory--both topics that are nothing to sneeze at (hell, someone just won a Nobel Prize for their Game Theory contributions!).  If you want something you won't be able to understand, pick up my books from either one of these classes--I guarantee you will be lost.

Economics is commonly believed to be only a "business" major, but a lot of it has to do with understanding people's behavior, making rational decisions, forming public policy, etc.  All of these skills are important for law school, life in general, and ESPECIALLY important for people like me who want to go into politics.

BTW, what example of English Lit is out there that I couldn't possibly understand in a few minutes?  It's certainly practical, but its not so much difficult as it is time-consuming.

redemption

Re: Choice of major & LSAT/Law School success
« Reply #14 on: February 22, 2006, 04:01:25 PM »
Well I can believe that your graduate school may have invented it, but apparently such instruction has not filtered down into undergraduate teaching, which was the point I was making.

I dont mean to get snippy....But the economics courses i have taken at Cornell have, for the most part, been calculus courses...We even used Linear Algebra in one of our microeconomics courses.  SO anyway, im just making the point that not all undergraduate economics is easy.  English Lit is a very respectable major, and as a student with a philosophy concentration, I view that as a very relevant course of study.

Well, I guess my point is that linear algebra and calculus are not only quite easy (especially to the extent that they are used in economics; and double-especially the way that they are used in UG economics) but they are mechanical too. they don't actually require you to THINK about anything, just to solve problems, and not very interesting problems at that.

My university makes no real distinction between graduate and undergraduate courses, btw, whether in economics or anything else.

I am saying these things a little bit tongue-in-cheek of course, but I'm also very serious about it and believe what I am saying.

Still, it's just my opinion and I don't want anyone to be upset with me or anything.

redemption

Re: Choice of major & LSAT/Law School success
« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2006, 04:01:57 PM »
I would question the distinction between English Lit and Philosophy anyway. They are very closely related.


Rorty, are you trolling LSD?

Well done. Full marks to you!

Re: Choice of major & LSAT/Law School success
« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2006, 04:04:05 PM »
Have you taken a course in upper level economics?.......

Re: Choice of major & LSAT/Law School success
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2006, 04:04:26 PM »
Quote
Any economist who would like to give me an example of something that they encountered that is non-trivial, please give me an example sometime and we can discuss it.

Controlling interest rates and the rate of inflation in a multi-trillion dollar economy really is trivial isn't it?  Even concepts such as supply and demand may be easy, but they certainly are not trivial.

redemption

Re: Choice of major & LSAT/Law School success
« Reply #18 on: February 22, 2006, 04:07:46 PM »
Yes redemption, ECON 101 is very easy.  If you haven't been through the many upper-level ECON classes then you really have no room to form an opinion on the matter.  There is a reason why Economics is a well-respected major by law schools--if it were "trivially easy", then it wouldnt get that kind of respect, would it?  

There's more to it than the supply and demand you learn with all the other kids who are required to take it as an elective.  This semester alone I'm taking Econometrics and Game Theory--both topics that are nothing to sneeze at (hell, someone just won a Nobel Prize for their Game Theory contributions!).  If you want something you won't be able to understand, pick up my books from either one of these classes--I guarantee you will be lost.

Economics is commonly believed to be only a "business" major, but a lot of it has to do with understanding people's behavior, making rational decisions, forming public policy, etc.  All of these skills are important for law school, life in general, and ESPECIALLY important for people like me who want to go into politics.

BTW, what example of English Lit is out there that I couldn't possibly understand in a few minutes?  It's certainly practical, but its not so much difficult as it is time-consuming.

I think that you are underestimating the extent to which I am familiar with economics and econometrics. I have taken advanced classes, just for kicks, with Jim Mirrlees and followed him all the way to equation 142(b) on dynamic equilibria without a problem. The problem is, as i say, that the mathematics is not particularly challenging (ask a math major whether econ math is challenging and see what her answer is).

Sometimes familiarity breeds contempt, and in this case, I'm afraid, it has.

As for English Lit. Try reading some Derrida or some Lacan (just a page will do) and tell me what they are saying.  ;)

redemption

Re: Choice of major & LSAT/Law School success
« Reply #19 on: February 22, 2006, 04:08:59 PM »
Quote
Any economist who would like to give me an example of something that they encountered that is non-trivial, please give me an example sometime and we can discuss it.

Controlling interest rates and the rate of inflation in a multi-trillion dollar economy really is trivial isn't it?  Even concepts such as supply and demand may be easy, but they certainly are not trivial.

Is that what undergraduate economics majors do? If not, could we stick to the topic?