Law School Discussion

Poll

Why are the Newbies scared to speak up?

They prefer to Lurk.
20 (36.4%)
They're not, they're just on another website.
4 (7.3%)
The Board is too cliquish.
10 (18.2%)
There's nothing interesting to talk about.
3 (5.5%)
There's nobody interesting to talk to.
2 (3.6%)
Not enough Board moderation.
4 (7.3%)
Newbies?  What Newbies?
12 (21.8%)

Total Members Voted: 55

Black Law Student Discussion Board

A.

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #32600 on: August 01, 2006, 01:39:39 PM »
So would you favor the categorical exclusion of "plus size" black women from these roles?

scurred1

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #32601 on: August 01, 2006, 01:39:46 PM »
Yah. Like the story said, if there's a prevalent stereotype about the fat, sassy black woman black filmmakers and comedians are some of the biggest culprits in perpetrating it.

I don't think the ad was offensive.

Miss P

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #32602 on: August 01, 2006, 01:40:18 PM »
Hm.  This seems to be a sensitive issue.  I recognize that there is a problem with the fat and sassy thing--I just don't think it's as big of a deal as many people quoted in that article would have us believe.  I think that regardless of what role a black woman is cast in, there will always be dissatisfaction.

Could this be because we've gotten so use to seeing those characters/images?

I'm looking at this from an objective perspective.  The creators obviously wanted a role in which someone gets angry.  Should they categorically exclude black women from that role?  Is that what we want?  If so, fine.  But if we actually want them to consider black women, then I'm saying it's not unfathomable that that black woman will be overweight, since the majority are, and that we shouldn't automatically assume that the role was designed to perpetuate the stereotype about black, fat, sassy women.

Oh, this is just silly, Alci.  You're reducing the fair criticisms a few people made to absurdity.  What if I said, "They were just looking for a hypersexual, depraved rapist-murderer type.  Should we categorically exclude young black men from these roles?"  The point is that it's not random that some people are cast in these roles frequently and others aren't.  It's not about individual casting decisions or a grand conspiracy. It's about the fact that these stereotypes seem to have taken hold in our culture.

BrerAnansi -- I totally agree with your questions and your point about the links thread.  Next time I'll post there.  I always forget!

A.

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #32603 on: August 01, 2006, 02:08:47 PM »
Hm.  This seems to be a sensitive issue.  I recognize that there is a problem with the fat and sassy thing--I just don't think it's as big of a deal as many people quoted in that article would have us believe.  I think that regardless of what role a black woman is cast in, there will always be dissatisfaction.

Could this be because we've gotten so use to seeing those characters/images?

I'm looking at this from an objective perspective.  The creators obviously wanted a role in which someone gets angry.  Should they categorically exclude black women from that role?  Is that what we want?  If so, fine.  But if we actually want them to consider black women, then I'm saying it's not unfathomable that that black woman will be overweight, since the majority are, and that we shouldn't automatically assume that the role was designed to perpetuate the stereotype about black, fat, sassy women.

Oh, this is just silly, Alci.  You're reducing the fair criticisms a few people made to absurdity.  What if I said, "They were just looking for a hypersexual, depraved rapist-murderer type.  Should we categorically exclude young black men from these roles?"  The point is that it's not random that some people are cast in these roles frequently and others aren't.  It's not about individual casting decisions or a grand conspiracy. It's about the fact that these stereotypes seem to have taken hold in our culture.

Like I said, I'm not denying the existence of the stereotype.  However, I am questioning whether the casting decisions are truly a result of that stereotype.  And if so, what would you desire to be done about it?

crazy8

Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #32604 on: August 01, 2006, 02:11:19 PM »
Brer Anansi said it best.  I think We should be focusing on who created these stereotypes and how we can combat them.  We can't degrade ourselves and laught about it, then complain when others do it.

AshyLarry

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #32605 on: August 01, 2006, 02:15:30 PM »
Brer Anansi said it best.  I think We should be focusing on who created these stereotypes and how we can combat them.  We can't degrade ourselves and laught about it, then complain when others do it.

I agree. This starts with comedians, movies, and musicians. They have the power to influence the way the puclic thinks and feels about certain things.

crazy8

Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #32606 on: August 01, 2006, 02:17:12 PM »
It's a sad reality about our society.  At what cost will we send ourselves for money?  :-\

jarhead

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #32607 on: August 01, 2006, 02:34:23 PM »
I think there are many issues at play here for one there are not enough of us in hollywood (writers, producers etc.) and the ones that are i think are too quick to grab a buck. i look at movies like soulpane i mean who read the screen play and said yeah this is a good movie i wanna be in this...we're are always complaining that white hollywood does give us enough quality roles but why should they? i mean these new so called "urban" movies, most of which are not much above a minstrel show in my opinion make money. people pay good money to go see them. so if i am a hollywood exec and im looking at ticket sales and i see a movie like Akkelah and the Bee barely make anything and some shucking and jiving hot mess like soulfood selling tickets what kind of movie am i going to green light?

2Lacoste

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #32608 on: August 01, 2006, 02:38:09 PM »
I think there are many issues at play here for one there are not enough of us in hollywood (writers, producers etc.) and the ones that are i think are too quick to grab a buck. i look at movies like soulpane i mean who read the screen play and said yeah this is a good movie i wanna be in this...we're are always complaining that white hollywood does give us enough quality roles but why should they? i mean these new so called "urban" movies, most of which are not much above a minstrel show in my opinion make money. people pay good money to go see them. so if i am a hollywood exec and im looking at ticket sales and i see a movie like Akkelah and the Bee barely make anything and some shucking and jiving hot mess like soulfood selling tickets what kind of movie am i going to green light?


Credited.

crazy8

Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #32609 on: August 01, 2006, 02:44:19 PM »
See the thing is why would anyone go to see a movie like soul plane?  I didn't see it, but if there's someone who did, was it humorous and worth your $8?  I also feel the same way about Hustle & Flow.  Some black people say it was good, but I couldn't watch it.