Law School Discussion

Law school in the UK + a return to the US afterwards?

Law school in the UK + a return to the US afterwards?
« on: June 25, 2008, 08:00:28 AM »
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Re: Law school in the UK + a return to the US afterwards?
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2008, 08:07:21 AM »
Yeah, it can be doen and is actually verh advisable in certain regards.  However, most people say go to a U.S. law school and study abroad for a year to get an LLM.  I don't know if you could get into Colubmia or not but they have an awesome awesome program for this.  Look into it.  Most schools will let you do that.

Re: Law school in the UK + a return to the US afterwards?
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2008, 09:19:16 AM »
Law school in the UK isnt done in the same way as in the US.

They start "law school" after highschool.

Ninja1

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Re: Law school in the UK + a return to the US afterwards?
« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2008, 02:24:15 PM »
I'm not sure about this, but don't foreign lawyers have to get an LLM from an American law school to practice in the U.S.? I see lots of schools that offer LLMs for foreign lawyers, so that's where I'm getting that from, plus it sounds like a good idea to have someone trained abroad take at least a year to get up to speed here.

That being said, why would you want to abandon the greatest higher education system in the world and the greatest country that has ever existed to go to dreary old England? If you want to come back here anyway, you should probably just stay here.

iscoredawaitlist

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Re: Law school in the UK + a return to the US afterwards?
« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2008, 02:40:50 PM »
don't do it. If you want to practice in the US, get the JD. As someone's mentioned before, you'll end up having to get a LLM anyway, and generally speaking LLMs have a much harder time getting jobs than JDs (take some firms and look at the NALP directory to see what I mean).

Those who practice law in England usually do so either by getting their BA or doing a conversion course from another subject. Then they generally do two years of Trainee Solicitor. LLMs themselves, so far as I know, don't actually qualify you to practice in the UK.

Switching from the US to England is much easier.