Law School Discussion

MCAT and LSAT

V

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MCAT and LSAT
« on: June 10, 2005, 11:47:16 AM »
So I met someone who is studying for MCAT.  I don't know too much about the test only that of course it's difficult.  But why, or maybe it's just me, is it that these MCAT people always try to justify (without you asking) that MCAT is WAAYYYYYY harder than LSAT?  Again though, maybe it's just me.  But any person I've ever me, I know not a fair representation of the sample, always act this way!

Has this ever happened to you?  And further, is it 'harder' b.c. more people apply to med schools and it's harder to become matriculated?

hizzle

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Re: MCAT and LSAT
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2005, 11:50:21 AM »
I thought the MCAT was easier than the LSAT in one way: it's almost all knowledge.  MCAT requires certain coursesand knowledge, but not nearly as much analytic thinking.  LSAT is more highly correlated to IQ (let the attack begin!)  I took the MCAT, LSAT, GRE general and LSAT all in one year during undergrad when I had no idea what I wanted.  In order of increasing difficulty, I would say GRE (800Q, 800A, 570V), GMAT (50Q, 48V, 770 combined), MCAT(12V, 15Phy, 11 Bio), LSAT (171).

As another interesting note, I have read in an analysis of various positions that doctors, on average, are more disciplined and work harder, and lawyers are, on average, more intelligent.  Of course, that all depends on how you measure intelligence.

Regards,

Hizzle

Re: MCAT and LSAT
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2005, 11:51:39 AM »
I had a friend who bombed the LSAT (138), but did quite well on the MCAT and went on to med school.. I don't think it's fair for anyone to say the MCAT is harder than the LSAT-- it tests a different set of skills entirely.

Re: MCAT and LSAT
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2005, 11:56:38 AM »
This is a link to an interesting article about the subject of the LSAT vs. MCAT. 

http://www.numbertwopencil.net/articles/misslsat/missinglsatsfull.html

sarcastic1

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Re: MCAT and LSAT
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2005, 02:47:43 PM »
My roommate was took the MCAT while I was studying for the LSAT and we frequently got into debates about this exact subject...


...then we decided to team up against education majors and their "basic skills test" they all freak out over.

ViagraSaint

Re: MCAT and LSAT
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2005, 03:01:02 PM »

took both.  The mcat is way harder

V

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Re: MCAT and LSAT
« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2005, 03:20:04 PM »
My roommate was took the MCAT while I was studying for the LSAT and we frequently got into debates about this exact subject...


...then we decided to team up against education majors and their "basic skills test" they all freak out over.


LOl :D   You know that test is not that easy and the title is definitely a misnomer; but so far for me, LSAT has been the most challenging exam.  And I have never taken nor plan to take MCAT.

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Re: MCAT and LSAT
« Reply #7 on: June 10, 2005, 03:20:35 PM »
This is a link to an interesting article about the subject of the LSAT vs. MCAT. 

http://www.numbertwopencil.net/articles/misslsat/missinglsatsfull.html


Very interesting.  Thank you for the link.  :)

Re: MCAT and LSAT
« Reply #8 on: June 10, 2005, 03:45:40 PM »
So I met someone who is studying for MCAT.  I don't know too much about the test only that of course it's difficult.  But why, or maybe it's just me, is it that these MCAT people always try to justify (without you asking) that MCAT is WAAYYYYYY harder than LSAT?  Again though, maybe it's just me.  But any person I've ever me, I know not a fair representation of the sample, always act this way!

Has this ever happened to you?  And further, is it 'harder' b.c. more people apply to med schools and it's harder to become matriculated?

Many people go to medical school because they want something, anything, to prove they are intelligent. Certainly, a sheepskin in medicine accomplishes this. To a degree, that is the motivation for many law students. Nevertheless, you will hear many prospective medical students who claim that the MCAT is harder than the LSAT.

The two tests are too different to compare. The MCAT has a major subject matter knowledge component. That is why, if you never took a collegiate science or math class, you will bomb the MCAT. On the other hand, it is not unusual for an engineering major who has never taken a logic or philosophy class, and ace the LSAT. The former teaches subject knowledge to a large extent, the latter teaches ONLY a narrow skill.  Is that a function of one being "easier" than the other or one testing general skills, whereas another testing specific knowledge.

Let's say one were to engage in a debate on economics.
The LSAT is like a test of debating skills. the MCAT teaches a little about debating, but a lot about economics. Clearly, the MCAT woudl be better for you to take. On the other hand, if you do not know which subject will be at issue, the LSAT would be better.

It is MUCH harder to get into medical schools than law schools. Medical schools are smaller, and tend to operate at a financial loss for its parent institution. Additionally, because medicine is an international affair, brilliant students from every country in the world want to come to the US to learn medicine. Comparatively few persons with intentions of practicing law overseas come to the US to learn laws which apply only within our borders. But, law schools are the most highly profitable of all schools, and the ABA accredits them year after year, only increasing the number of "average" students who are able to obtain a law degree.



ViagraSaint

Re: MCAT and LSAT
« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2005, 05:33:05 PM »
yea, but it would be misleading to claim having the subject matter knowledge is sufficient for performing well on the mcat, which certainly isn't the case.  anyone taking a real physics class (not the watered down non-calculus version) would understand the fallacy of claiming physics tests are just knowledge tests.  It's the application of the knowledge to new problems that makes it difficult.

the lsat basically tests common sense and the argument structure. arguments can be distilled from any $5 argument book.. premise, assumption, conclusion.. claim, warrant, premise... etc.  it's extremely simple.  and really what differentiates the two is the time element, playing a heavier factor in the lsat.  given broader time limits, most lsat takers would score 180.  that isn't the case with the mcat