Law School Discussion

Law Schools That Have No Curve

Re: Law Schools That Have No Curve
« Reply #10 on: May 09, 2005, 08:49:33 AM »
i go to american, and we have no curve.

Re: Law Schools That Have No Curve
« Reply #11 on: May 16, 2005, 01:59:03 PM »

The University of Montana School of Law

Re: Law Schools That Have No Curve
« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2005, 04:08:44 PM »
During my visit to McGeorge, I was told by someone in admissions that they have no forced curve. I am not sure how truthful this is. Anyone else know? I know they get rid of a lot of students each year.

Re: Law Schools That Have No Curve
« Reply #13 on: May 29, 2005, 05:45:31 AM »
Northwestern has no curve, does not rank students at all

Classes above 40 are curved so most of the 1L classes are curved, after that there are plenty of non-curved classes.  However, there is no class rank, and On Campus Interviewing is done on a random lottery.

Indeed!

Yale s Theoretical Bent
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2005, 03:07:09 AM »
Yale. You either get "Pass" or "Honors". And you could probably fail a class, but I doubt that happens very often. Realistically, anyone who gets into Yale is probably going to put forth some effort, but there isn't a whole lot of pressure to go nuts. I mean, even if you get all "Pass" scores, you still graduated from freakin' Yale Law. I'd guess that getting a lot of "Honors" would give the top Yale students priority for the super prestegious clerkships, like working for a Supreme Court justice. But really, as long as you graduate and pass the bar (as over 94% do- which is actually disturbingly low [it really should be 100% on the first attempt] in my opinion considering the outrageously high GPA and LSAT scores of their student body) you'll have an enormous advantage over the graduates from almost every other law school.


"Anarchic" isn't a word often associated with the Ivy League. But it's how students, faculty, and even the immediate past dean describe Yale Law. And with good reason: The traditionally grueling first term is un-graded (and subsequent courses are graded on an honors, pass, low-pass, or fail basis), there are virtually no course requirements past first term, and professors are free to choose what they want to teach. Current Dean Harold Koh, an international human-rights expert who served as assistant secretary of state in the Clinton administration, recently took a class to a screening of the legal thriller Runaway Jury , during which he loudly enumerated the film's many procedural errors.

High-minded. Classes at Yale are highly theoretical; this is not the place to look for the nuts and bolts of practice. "You're going to have to cram for six miserable weeks for the bar exam anyway, so why waste time preparing when you're in law school?" A recent contracts course included a long, spirited discussion over whether Pepsi could in theory be held liable for its TV commercial offering a Harrier Jet to customers who collected 7 million Pepsi points. At other schools, "I might spend time going over statutes," says Richard Brooks, an associate professor who teaches contracts. But this high-minded approach has its limits, students say. "Most people coming from Yale haven't spent time taking bankruptcy or even business organization, and you come to a big firm and it's a large part of what you do," says 2004 grad Matt Alsdorf, now an associate at a large New York firm. "It isn't a deficit you can't make up, but sometimes have to go to the library and take out a book on securities."

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Re: Law Schools That Have No Curve
« Reply #15 on: May 31, 2005, 06:00:10 AM »
Yale. You either get "Pass" or "Honors". And you could probably fail a class, but I doubt that happens very often. Realistically, anyone who gets into Yale is probably going to put forth some effort, but there isn't a whole lot of pressure to go nuts. I mean, even if you get all "Pass" scores, you still graduated from freakin' Yale Law. I'd guess that getting a lot of "Honors" would give the top Yale students priority for the super prestegious clerkships, like working for a Supreme Court justice. But really, as long as you graduate and pass the bar (as over 94% do- which is actually disturbingly low [it really should be 100% on the first attempt] in my opinion considering the outrageously high GPA and LSAT scores of their student body) you'll have an enormous advantage over the graduates from almost every other law school.


"Anarchic" isn't a word often associated with the Ivy League. But it's how students, faculty, and even the immediate past dean describe Yale Law. And with good reason: The traditionally grueling first term is un-graded (and subsequent courses are graded on an honors, pass, low-pass, or fail basis), there are virtually no course requirements past first term, and professors are free to choose what they want to teach. Current Dean Harold Koh, an international human-rights expert who served as assistant secretary of state in the Clinton administration, recently took a class to a screening of the legal thriller Runaway Jury , during which he loudly enumerated the film's many procedural errors.

High-minded. Classes at Yale are highly theoretical; this is not the place to look for the nuts and bolts of practice. "You're going to have to cram for six miserable weeks for the bar exam anyway, so why waste time preparing when you're in law school?" A recent contracts course included a long, spirited discussion over whether Pepsi could in theory be held liable for its TV commercial offering a Harrier Jet to customers who collected 7 million Pepsi points. At other schools, "I might spend time going over statutes," says Richard Brooks, an associate professor who teaches contracts. But this high-minded approach has its limits, students say. "Most people coming from Yale haven't spent time taking bankruptcy or even business organization, and you come to a big firm and it's a large part of what you do," says 2004 grad Matt Alsdorf, now an associate at a large New York firm. "It isn't a deficit you can't make up, but sometimes have to go to the library and take out a book on securities."

For the full report, go to USNews.

Re: Law Schools That Have No Curve
« Reply #16 on: May 31, 2005, 02:51:19 PM »
tag

lisa


Re: Law Schools That Have No Curve
« Reply #18 on: June 04, 2005, 02:38:23 PM »
Quote
A recent contracts course included a long, spirited discussion over whether Pepsi could in theory be held liable for its TV commercial offering a Harrier Jet to customers who collected 7 million Pepsi points.

The Harrier jet case, Leonard v. Pepsico, is a classic offer/acceptance case taught in probably 80% of the contracts courses in the country.  Nothing unusual here.

However, you're right that Ivy league and other top schools' courses tend to be much more theoretical.  If you've taken law school exams at "average" schools and compare them w/ sample tests from the Ivies (available on the web) you can see the difference.  I think this gives the Ivies some credibility when claiming that they're more rigorous.  It's also in keeping w/ their mission of training law students more for academia than for workaday practice.

Re: Law Schools That Have No Curve
« Reply #19 on: June 05, 2005, 12:11:55 AM »
Just as it's said above (right, why am I repeating it?! ;) University of California, Berkeley Boalt Hall Law School, just like Yale, does not have a curve, in fact, does not give grades at all (LOL)