Law School Discussion

Important question about about prepping for law school

Re: Important question about about prepping for law school
« Reply #50 on: April 08, 2005, 10:33:22 AM »
I think it's interesting that some (not all) of the pre-law folks come to this board looking for advice and then completely disregard what actual law students have to say. 

While it's obvious that everyone will prepare as he or she sees fit, I can tell you, that at least in my case, there was no correlation between law school preparation and law school performance.  I spent the summer before law school lifeguarding.  I didn't read anything other than Sports Illustrated and the Sunday newspaper.  I'm now about to finish my second year, and I have had much "success" in law school.  (By the way, I'm a law school senior citizen at 26.  I didn't come straight from undergrad.)  I don't think that I'm an anomaly. 

I give little credence to the law school preparation materials that purport to tell you "everything you need to know about law school".  First, that's impossible, because every law student's experience is different.  Second, I've seen students come into law school having read all those books; a common problem is that they have rigid opinions about how things should work, and then have to spend most of their first year adjusting their expectations rather than coping with the actual experience.   

No book and nobody on a message board will tell you the "right" way to prepare for law school.  Seek advice from practitioners and law students that you know and trust.  Only you can decide how much weight to give to their recommendations. 

Re: Important question about about prepping for law school
« Reply #51 on: April 08, 2005, 10:46:53 AM »
I think it's interesting that some (not all) of the pre-law folks come to this board looking for advice and then completely disregard what actual law students have to say. 

You're so right.  It's funny that student after student can say the same thing, but all of us future 1L's just ignore it.  Anyhow, I definately am listening to what you have to say. 

You know, for all that people talk about reading books about law schools and trying to figure out the "secrets" of doing well, not many people talk about just showing up and doing what the professor advises.  But the professors actually do want students to succeed -- to become good lawyers -- don't they?  Would it be that crazy just to listen to them, instead of listening to something you bought at your local Borders?


Re: Important question about about prepping for law school
« Reply #52 on: April 08, 2005, 01:33:37 PM »
I think that is a great point JD MSA.

Re: Important question about about prepping for law school
« Reply #53 on: April 08, 2005, 02:42:50 PM »
Thanks everyone for the helpful advice!!!!! ;)

Re: Important question about about prepping for law school
« Reply #54 on: April 08, 2005, 08:22:18 PM »
This is the first time I have ever posted here, so feel free to ignore me.

I have done well so far, but still have a long way to go.

I worked for four years between college and law school.  I work very hard this year. Like you, I wanted to do what I could to prepare the summer before law school.  I decided against taking BarBri.

I think that if you are going to read anything, it is best to read things that will help you succeed in law school rather than substantive material.  I have found that using outlines and E&E is most helpful in conjunction with what you are doing in class.  The one book I would definitely recommend is "Getting to Maybe."  This book is about taking law school exams and does a very good job explaining how to succeed when writing your exams.  The authors also offer a seminar, and if it is coming to a location near you, I would advise taking it.

I don't think that it will hurt you to spend your summer reading E&E or Gilberts, but I don't think that it will put you at an advantage either.  You will learn all the law you need when you start school.  I think that it is better to use these as supplements to your class reading because often your professor will have different views on the rationale behind the law or perhaps will have different views on what the law should be.

Before I started school, I read Getting to Maybe, One L, To Kill a Mockingbird, and Law School Confidential.  I think that these all got me into the proper mindset to get back into school mode, but I really feel that if I had done anything to prepare substantively over the summer, it would have been a waste.

That being said, once you start school, I would second the recommendations of the poster above who recommended:

E&E for Civ Pro by Glannon
Understanding Criminal Law by Dressler
Gilberts for Property
Plain English for Lawyers for legal writing
E&E for Torts

These books all do great jobs, but I think they are best used in conjunction with your school work. 

A big part of law school is figuring out what works for you, so if you think that it's better for you to read everything in the summer, that's what you should do.  I just don't know how valuable it is to cram all that stuff into the summer when you are going to be learning it all again in school.

Good luck.  Law School can be a lot of work, but if you are serious about it, it can also be a lot of fun and a pretty rewarding experience.

Re: Important question about about prepping for law school
« Reply #55 on: April 09, 2005, 10:39:32 AM »
I think the best thing to read for prep is "The Common Law" by Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.  A series of lectures he gave in the late 1800s on the development and policy issues surrounding common law (which would include Torts, Contracts and Property). 

Throw Glannon's Civ. Pro. E&E on top of that and you should be good to go.

Re: Important question about about prepping for law school
« Reply #56 on: April 09, 2005, 03:16:06 PM »
Thanks for the supplementals!  Awesome! ;)

This is the first time I have ever posted here, so feel free to ignore me.

I have done well so far, but still have a long way to go.

I worked for four years between college and law school.  I work very hard this year. Like you, I wanted to do what I could to prepare the summer before law school.  I decided against taking BarBri.

I think that if you are going to read anything, it is best to read things that will help you succeed in law school rather than substantive material.  I have found that using outlines and E&E is most helpful in conjunction with what you are doing in class.  The one book I would definitely recommend is "Getting to Maybe."  This book is about taking law school exams and does a very good job explaining how to succeed when writing your exams.  The authors also offer a seminar, and if it is coming to a location near you, I would advise taking it.

I don't think that it will hurt you to spend your summer reading E&E or Gilberts, but I don't think that it will put you at an advantage either.  You will learn all the law you need when you start school.  I think that it is better to use these as supplements to your class reading because often your professor will have different views on the rationale behind the law or perhaps will have different views on what the law should be.

Before I started school, I read Getting to Maybe, One L, To Kill a Mockingbird, and Law School Confidential.  I think that these all got me into the proper mindset to get back into school mode, but I really feel that if I had done anything to prepare substantively over the summer, it would have been a waste.

That being said, once you start school, I would second the recommendations of the poster above who recommended:

E&E for Civ Pro by Glannon
Understanding Criminal Law by Dressler
Gilberts for Property
Plain English for Lawyers for legal writing
E&E for Torts

These books all do great jobs, but I think they are best used in conjunction with your school work. 

A big part of law school is figuring out what works for you, so if you think that it's better for you to read everything in the summer, that's what you should do.  I just don't know how valuable it is to cram all that stuff into the summer when you are going to be learning it all again in school.

Good luck.  Law School can be a lot of work, but if you are serious about it, it can also be a lot of fun and a pretty rewarding experience.

Re: Important question about about prepping for law school
« Reply #57 on: April 09, 2005, 03:17:20 PM »
I've never seen anyone recommend "The Common Law."  Can I get that at the library?

Also, where can I get Glannon's Civ Pro book at a good deal?

Thanks!

I think the best thing to read for prep is "The Common Law" by Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.  A series of lectures he gave in the late 1800s on the development and policy issues surrounding common law (which would include Torts, Contracts and Property). 

Throw Glannon's Civ. Pro. E&E on top of that and you should be good to go.

Re: Important question about about prepping for law school
« Reply #58 on: April 09, 2005, 05:03:50 PM »
I've never seen anyone recommend "The Common Law."  Can I get that at the library?

Also, where can I get Glannon's Civ Pro book at a good deal?

Thanks!

I think the best thing to read for prep is "The Common Law" by Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.  A series of lectures he gave in the late 1800s on the development and policy issues surrounding common law (which would include Torts, Contracts and Property). 

Throw Glannon's Civ. Pro. E&E on top of that and you should be good to go.

In the two weeks since you started this thread I'm sure you could have found plenty of copies of the all of the E&Es on half.com for cheap.  No idea if The Common Law is available at your library, but they are but a phone call away...

Re: Important question about about prepping for law school
« Reply #59 on: April 10, 2005, 09:10:12 AM »
Thanks for your generous help! ::)

I've never seen anyone recommend "The Common Law."  Can I get that at the library?

Also, where can I get Glannon's Civ Pro book at a good deal?

Thanks!

I think the best thing to read for prep is "The Common Law" by Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.  A series of lectures he gave in the late 1800s on the development and policy issues surrounding common law (which would include Torts, Contracts and Property). 

Throw Glannon's Civ. Pro. E&E on top of that and you should be good to go.

In the two weeks since you started this thread I'm sure you could have found plenty of copies of the all of the E&Es on half.com for cheap.  No idea if The Common Law is available at your library, but they are but a phone call away...