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Topics - pastor of muppets

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General Off-Topic Board / Did Cheney screw himself?
« on: June 27, 2007, 02:41:55 PM »
Quote
Senate Issues Subpoenas in Eavesdropping Investigation
By JAMES RISEN

WASHINGTON, June 27 — The Senate Judiciary Committee issued a series of subpoenas to the White House, Vice President Cheney’s office, and the Justice Department today related to the National Security Agency’s warrantless wiretapping program, setting the stage for a major legal showdown between Congress and the Bush Administration.

Senator Patrick Leahy, the Vermont Democrat who is chairman of the committee, said the subpoenas seek documents that could shed light on the legal basis used by the administration to justify the wiretapping program. In addition, the panel is seeking materials on the way the program operated, including the relationship between the agency and several unidentified telecommunications companies that aided the eavesdropping program.

The panel’s action was the most aggressive so far by lawmakers investigating the wiretapping program since the Democrats gained control of Congress in January. It follows Senate testimony in May by a former deputy attorney general, James Comey, who described with cinematic sweep a major showdown over the legality of the program that took place at the hospital bedside of John Ashcroft, then the attorney general, in March 2004.


How is male private part Cheney going to weasel out of this one?  It would be pretty hard for him to claim executive privilege, since he is apparently not part of the executive branch!   :D

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General Off-Topic Board / Clarence Thomas, Crotchety Old Man
« on: June 25, 2007, 04:41:28 PM »
Here is an excerpt of Thomas' concurring opinion in Morse v. Frederick (Bong Hits 4 Jesus), released today:

Quote
During the colonial era, private schools and tutors offered the only educational opportunities for children, and teachers managed classrooms with an iron hand. R. Butts & L. Cremin, A History of Education in American Culture 121, 123 (1953) (hereinafter Butts). Public schooling arose, in part, as a way to educate those too poor to afford private schools. See Kaestle & Vinovskis, From Apron Strings to ABCs: Parents, Children, and Schooling in Nineteenth-Century Massachusetts, 84 Am. J. Sociology S39, S49 (Supp. 1978). Because public schools were initially created as substitutes for private schools, when States developed public education systems in the early 1800’s, no one doubted the government’s ability to educate and discipline children as private schools did. Like their private counterparts, early public schools were not places for freewheeling debates or exploration of competing ideas. Rather, teachers instilled “a core of common values” in students and taught them self-control. Reese 23; A. Potter & G. Emerson, The School and the Schoolmaster: A Manual 125 (1843) (“By its discipline it contributes, insensibly, to generate a spirit of subordination to lawful authority, a power of self-control, and a habit of postponing present indulgence to a greater future good …”); D. Parkerson & J. Parkerson, The Emergence of the Common School in the U. S. Countryside 6 (1998) (hereinafter Parkerson) (noting that early education activists, such as Benjamin Rush, believed public schools “help[ed] control the innate selfishness of the individual”).

    Teachers instilled these values not only by presenting ideas but also through strict discipline. Butts 274–275. Schools punished students for behavior the school considered disrespectful or wrong. Parkerson 65 (noting that children were punished for idleness, talking, profanity, and slovenliness). Rules of etiquette were enforced, and courteous behavior was demanded. Reese 40. To meet their educational objectives, schools required absolute obedience. C. Northend, The Teacher’s Assistant or Hints and Methods in School Discipline and Instruction 44, 52 (1865) (“I consider a school judiciously governed, where order prevails; where the strictest sense of propriety is manifested by the pupils towards the teacher, and towards each other . . .” (internal quotation marks omitted)).2

    In short, in the earliest public schools, teachers taught, and students listened. Teachers commanded, and students obeyed. Teachers did not rely solely on the power of ideas to persuade; they relied on discipline to maintain order.

There is a lot more of that in the rest of his opinion here:  http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/06-278.ZC.html

Does anybody doubt that if he could, Thomas would build himself a time machine and immediately travel back to the 18th century?   :D

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General Off-Topic Board / John from Cincinnati is John the Baptist
« on: June 24, 2007, 10:22:56 PM »
Anybody watch the show?  Because I am convinced that John from Cincinnati is supposed to be a modern day John the Baptist, which would mean that the second coming of Christ would be imminent, which would explain why he always says sh!t like "the end is near" and "see God."

If this is true, than obviously the kid is Jesus.

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So I was all set to go to Gonzaga, but I recently learned that I have been accepted at Case Western.  While it is possible that I could still receive some scholarship money from them, I think its pretty unlikely due to being accepted this late in the game, and also because my numbers are nothing impressive for that school.

So I am basically looking at attending Gonzaga with a 1/2 tuition scholarship (which requires me to stay in the top 50% to maintain), or paying full price for Case Western.

According to estimated total costs from both schools, I would graduate Case Western with a little over 150K in debt, whereas Gonzaga would leave me with half as much debt.

Some factors to consider are that I see myself practicing in the Pacific Northwest, and I will most likely want to go into government or public interest work.

My thinking is that I should go to Gonzaga as having less debt will make it much easier for me to take a lower paying (but hopefully more rewarding) job.  However, there is no question that Case is the more respected school, and I would definitely have better professors there.  Cleveland might not capture anyone with its magic, but Spokane is no gem either.

Any thoughts are appreciated.  I am specifically interested in people's thoughts on Case Western, as I have visited Gonzaga and have a pretty good idea of what I would be getting myself into there, but I have never been to Case, or anywhere in Ohio for that matter.

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General Off-Topic Board / Recommend a movie
« on: June 01, 2007, 04:44:02 PM »
Recommend a movie that most people have probably not seen.  It can be an art-house film, a cult classic, an older picture, or an underrated guilty pleasure.

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General Off-Topic Board / Jerry Falwell
« on: May 15, 2007, 11:30:36 AM »
Let the mourning begin.   :'(

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General Off-Topic Board / All lawyers are nuts
« on: May 15, 2007, 12:17:38 AM »
I know that many people on this board have worked for law firms and/or having family members/connections who are lawyers.  Don't you find that most lawyers are insane?

The reason I ask is that I have been thinking about this a lot lately.  To me, it comes down to a question of the chicken and the egg.  Are they crazy because they are lawyers, or are they lawyers because they are crazy?

Thoughts?  Did this entered your mind at all as you chose to attend law school?

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Incoming 1Ls / Need help re Letter of Continued Interest
« on: April 18, 2007, 11:16:00 AM »
I posted this over on the "Where Should I Go" board, but was getting no love.  Here is an abridged version:

I am putting together a letter of continued interest for a school that I am waitlisted at (but really want to get into), and was hoping to get some feedback from others here as to what constitutes a great LOCI.

I've been sticking to a page - 1 1/2 pages in length, figuring that a long letter will not be appreciated given how busy the Admissions folk are at every school this time of year.  Here is an outline of what I've got right now:

1.  I want to continue being considered for admission at school X
2.  School X is a great school with an excellent reputation
3.  I dig School X's academic philosophy and atmosphere
4.  The city School X is in is awesome and offers great opportunities
5.  I will go there if I get admitted

Now, obviously this letter is going to be somewhat vague, since it is brief by design.  My question is, do people tend to be more specific in their reasons?

Any tips?  I really want to get into this school.  We are basically talking the difference between a T3 and a T1, and I also really like the school besides just the T1 status.

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Choosing the Right Law School / LOCI help
« on: April 18, 2007, 10:19:30 AM »
OK, I'm sure this has been discussed time and time again, but with no search feature...

So I received notice from my top choice the other day that I have been waitlisted.  I am currently putting together a LOCI to send to them.  I've done a few of these for other schools and generally felt pretty good about them, but since I really actually honestly do want to go to this school more than the others, I am now suffering from a crisis of confidence.  I was hoping to get some feedback from others here as to what constitutes a great LOCI.

I've been sticking to a page - 1 1/2 pages in length, figuring that a long letter will not be appreciated given how busy the Admissions folk are at every school this time of year.  Basically I start off saying that I received word of being placed on their waitlist and would like to continue being considered for admission.  Then I go into listing reasons why I want to go to that school.

The problem lies in the reasons why I want to go there.  In this letter that I am writing right now they seem rather vague and obvious.  What I've got is:

1.  Its a school with an excellent reputation
2.  I dig their academic philosophy and the school's collegial atmosphere
3.  The city it is in is awesome and offers great opportunities

Now, obviously this letter is going to be somewhat vague, since it is brief by design.  My question is, do people tend to be more specific in their reasons?  I would think that schools might like that, but on the other hand I don't really have a compelling reason other than I just know that I want to go there.

I am finishing off this letter by reiterating that I want to continue being considered and that although I have submitted a deposit at another school, I will definitely attend if I were to get admitted.

Any tips?  I really want to get into this school.  We are basically talking the difference between a T3 and a T1, and I also really like the school besides just the T1 status.

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Choosing the Right Law School / Best books to prepare for law school?
« on: April 12, 2007, 10:55:43 AM »
So I'm looking to do a little reading up over the summer to try to get a little ahead of the game going into law school.  I know that no book is going to prepare me to ace every test I'm given, but I just want to get a little idea of what I'm in for.

Anyway, I've been recommended Law School Confidential and Getting to Maybe.  Also recommended to me, on this board, were John Delaney's How to Do Your Best on Law School Exams and Learning Legal Reasoning: Briefing, Analysis and Theory.

I am wondering if anybody can offer comments on these books?  Checking them out on Amazon is little help, as they all purport to tell you exactly how to graduate in the top of your class.  At least half of those damn "customer reviews" are probably entirely made up too.

Any thoughts?

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