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1
Politics and Law-Related News / ,
« on: February 05, 2008, 08:35:33 PM »
,

2
Minority and Non-Traditional Law Students / .
« on: January 13, 2008, 08:45:08 PM »
.

3
Acceptances, Denials, and Waitlists / Columbia vs. NYU $$ Poll
« on: October 16, 2007, 01:56:23 PM »
The previous poll showed Columbia preferred 3 to 1 over NYU.  This should show how much preferred Columbia is.

4
Law School Admissions / When is FAFSA 2008 available?
« on: October 09, 2007, 03:51:06 PM »
Does anybody know the date?

5
Acceptances, Denials, and Waitlists / Penn vs. Chicago Poll
« on: September 25, 2007, 05:09:19 PM »
And while geography could influence your vote, don't let it be personal geographical ties or  your vote won't have value for others.  (i.e. Chicago may indeed get a bump if you like the Midwest, and the voting might reflect that, but if your ex-husband and his wife are at Penn but your best friend is at Chicago, that type of stuff won't be helpful in determining the better school from the point of view of LSDers.

Every year on this site--I've been around a long time :-[-- people will debate this stuff.  So here is a chance to simply tally votes.

6
Acceptances, Denials, and Waitlists / Harvard vs. Stanford Poll
« on: September 25, 2007, 05:08:08 PM »
And while geography could influence your vote, don't let it be personal geographical ties or  your vote won't have value for others.  (i.e. Harvard may indeed get a bump if you like New England, and the voting might reflect that, but if your ex-husband and his wife are at Stanford but your best friend is at Harvard, that type of stuff won't be helpful in determining the better school from the point of view of LSDers.

Every year on this site--I've been around a long time :-[-- people will debate this stuff.  So here is a chance to simply tally votes.

7
Acceptances, Denials, and Waitlists / NYU vs. Columbia Poll
« on: September 25, 2007, 05:04:42 PM »
Every year on this site--I've been around a long time :-[-- people will debate this stuff.  So here is a chance to simply tally votes.

8
Law School Admissions / Anyone still pending?
« on: May 26, 2006, 08:36:48 AM »
Anyone out there still pending?

Anyone out there still held/deferred/on a waitlist?

Let us know which camp you're in.

9
I'm still waiting on an answer from two schools, and having lowered my expectations at this point from anticipating a positive decision to just anticipating any piece of mail with my name on it, I've been looking at LSN to see how many more decisions we can expect to be given out. 

I looked at the schools results from last year to try to get an estimate of how many LSNers never change their profile from "pending."  (I'm of course assuming that these people aren't still pending.  :D)  I found that for the top 10 USNews schools, on average 12.8% of applicants never changed their profiles.

Then I looked at this year's applications to see how many are still awaiting decisions.  Here's what I found (school name followed by the percentage of applicants who are still waiting for a response):

Y:  17.8
S:  17.0
H:  21.1
C:  16.5
N:  15.1
C:  15.5
P:  16.2
M:  10.8
V:  09.8
B:  15.8

Of these, only Michigan and Virginia are below the 12.8% as a flexible floor, meaning that they have given everyone an initial decision.


Anyway, this got me thinking.  We ought to use this board for something worthwhile now that the cycle is basically over for most of us: we could come up with a ranking of law schools based on the most pleasant to apply to, or which schools we seem to think have the fairest admission policies.  Throughout the meat of the cycle, LSD is useful, but at this point it is mostly social.

One criteria would be to say who gives out decisions the slowest (being a negative trait).  Or we could give our impression on who is most beholden to USNews (who yield protects the most, who most makes decisions based on LSAT and GPA and who looks at soft factors (we could look at spreads between 25 and 75 or we could site examples on LSN of people with outstanding extracurriculars but a low LSAT and which school took a chance on them and which school didn't)) you know, stuff like that.

Any suggestions?

10
Some of us are still waiting on decisions and there seemed to be some talk that schools are waiting until after deposit deadline to see what their class would look like before making any more offers.  People have also been talking about how fewer applicants but more applications would make for a possibly higher than average end of cycle acceptance rate. 

But here is what LSN shows.

Two cycles ago, Harvard admitted 17.4% of LSNers.
Last year, Harvard again admitted 17.4% of LSNers.
This cycle, Harvard has already admitted 18.7% of LSNers.

That says to me that they are already planning for the fact that more people are applying to more schools, and (in their case) that more students are taking money offers at lower ranked schools than they have in the past.


Of course, this all depends on how representative LSN is of the overall pool.  I think we all agree that LSN represents a higher than average group from within the actual applicant pool (LSN medians are consistently higher than the actual medians), which is why we don't compare LSN totals to the overall totals.  But if we compare LSN totals (or percentages) from year to year, we have to wonder if LSNers from different years continue to represent the same group from within the actual applicant pool.  This is probably impossible to prove either way, but reason suggests to me that as LSN becomes more and more widely known and used (suggested by the total number of user accounts, and more school specifically--but less accurately--by the total number of applications at a given school), LSN will come closer and closer to being representative of the group as a whole, thus down shifting the quality of applicants and down shifting the acceptance rate of LSNers.

So, if anything, we should expect the acceptance rate at Harvard to go from 17.4 to a slightly lower number.  But the opposite is true.  My guess is that they are already counting on lower yield this year than last, and have already worked that into the offers they have already made.


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