Law School Discussion

Applying to Law School => Law School Admissions => Topic started by: LegallyNat on July 29, 2004, 08:06:31 AM

Title: UK LAW SCHOOLS ANYONE???
Post by: LegallyNat on July 29, 2004, 08:06:31 AM
does anyone know of any good british law schools in central london??
Title: Re: UK LAW SCHOOLS ANYONE???
Post by: nonobvious on July 29, 2004, 08:14:26 AM
As it so happens... here's a link to TheGuardian's rankings of British law schools, with links to their sites:

http://education.guardian.co.uk/higher/unitable/0,11985,723568,00.html
Title: Re: UK LAW SCHOOLS ANYONE???
Post by: nonobvious on July 29, 2004, 08:25:19 AM
And a question for you: how did you find legal internships in London?
Title: Re: UK LAW SCHOOLS ANYONE???
Post by: Ginatio on July 29, 2004, 08:28:37 AM
holy crap, look at their "% female students" statistic... 54-65% across the board... those brits have the right idea!
Title: Re: UK LAW SCHOOLS ANYONE???
Post by: The Name's Dali on July 29, 2004, 08:38:55 AM
Can you practice in the US w/ a UK law degree?
Title: Re: UK LAW SCHOOLS ANYONE???
Post by: LegallyNat on July 29, 2004, 08:48:19 AM
nonobvious, thanks for the rankings...that really helps. umm..i am a european citizen, not american so it is not a problem for me to work in the EU.
bravesfan21, no i believe you cannot practice law in the us with a uk degree. you can however practice in europe with an american degree i think. at least i know ppl in london who spent a year in london transferring and studying uk law.
Title: Re: UK LAW SCHOOLS ANYONE???
Post by: LegallyNat on July 29, 2004, 08:49:10 AM
actually, i wonder how the uk - us thing works when you study international law. anyone know?
Title: Re: UK LAW SCHOOLS ANYONE???
Post by: jacy85 on July 29, 2004, 08:56:39 AM
It's relative easy to get a JD in the US and practice in the UK.  An attorney who used to work at my firm recently relocated with her husband, who is originally from the UK.  You just need to take the UK "bar" exam.  She was going to be a solicitor, I'm not sure about barristers, and if you can just take a different certifying exam or whatnot.
Title: Re: UK LAW SCHOOLS ANYONE???
Post by: londongirl on July 29, 2004, 10:58:08 AM
Finally a post on which I comment with a degree of authority!

You must have at least two years of work experience in the US before you can take the qualifying exam to transfer to English law (UK law does not exist - Scottish law is different). If you search BPP professional school on the net you can get info on the modules you have to take before you can qualify here.
Technically it's certainly possible, but if you're not working for a big international law firm, expect this tranfer exam to be taken with a certain amount of skepticism by many employers. This is because it is relatively new, and most partners in national firms will not be familiar with it, and will be concerned about a lack of experience in England.
The 'bar' exam does not exist over here. Training is different for solicitors and barristers.
Good luck to all!
Title: Re: UK LAW SCHOOLS ANYONE???
Post by: LegallyNat on July 30, 2004, 01:20:01 AM
londongirl, since you are clearly on top of your game, i was wondering if you had any helpful advice on what i have to do to get into a british uni and if you have any recommendations.
Title: Re: UK LAW SCHOOLS ANYONE???
Post by: londongirl on July 30, 2004, 02:00:38 AM
Sure!
Well, your route depends on several factors, the most important one initially is whether to practice as a barrister or solicitor, as the training varies for each. I only really know about becoming a solicitor.

Second, you must decide what type of law you wish to practice. If it's corporate, try and get  'magic circle' city firm to sponsor you through the training to become a solicitor. If not, you'll have to pay yourself (but it's much less expensive than in the U.S).
Then you have several options for solicitors' training, and it's a bit confusing so tell me if this doesn't make sense. Note that law undergrad exists in England. So you may choose to go back to undergrad (LLB) which, if it's your second degree, they will most likely allow you to complete in two instead of three years. You then have the first part of your training, approved by the 'Law Society' (like ABA). After that, you'll have to take a course called the LPC (legal practice course), which will have to be proceeded by a training contract in a firm, lasting two years. During those years you are paid and you rotate, doing seats in various departments. Then you become a qualified solicitor and, if you want to stay, the firm normally keeps you on. Do note that in England it's much harder to get the training contract than to get into law school.
If you choose not to do a second BA, you must do what's called the CPE before the LPC instead. CPE stands for 'conversion practice course' to law, for people who do not have a law undergraduate degree. It lasts one year.

I would recomment the second BA option. You'll have a more in depth knowledge of the law, which will appeal to employers, and you'll really get the English university experience, which is fun! The LPC and CPE are studied in professional law colleges that teach only that, so the atmosphere is less than vibrant. There are tons of great universities you could apply to here, depending on your grades and credentials. Oxford is best for law. I am finishing an undergraduate degree in English and French there this year and can tell you it's a fantastic place to be. In London, try King's College and UCL. Though there are tons of others. I noticed you mentioned Warwick.... it's horrid, don't go there! For uni listings, go to UCAS.ac.uk. UCAS is the University and Colleges Admissions Service.

Other useful sites you'd have to do a Google.co.uk search for are: The Law Society, The College of Law, BPP Law school. These two schools offer the CPE +LPC in London.

The Law Society will tell you stuff about becoming a barrister, it's rather complicated.

Do tell me if I've been unclear or there's anything else you'd like to know. And if you decide to apply! May I ask what had prompted your interest? I ask because I'm British and want to get a J.D....

Best wishes,

me