Law School Discussion

Law Students => Online Law Schools => Topic started by: calgal27 on October 07, 2010, 07:40:37 AM

Title: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: calgal27 on October 07, 2010, 07:40:37 AM
Has anyone dealt with this school?  They seem affordable and do pretty much what Taft, Abe and Concord do but at a much cheaper price tag.   I actually talked to the director and the admissions director and while they were nice, I wasn't sure about the school.  What you read and what they offer are 2 different things.  I tried Taft... they are a joke....

Thanks!
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: GovLaw on October 07, 2010, 09:49:30 AM
American Heritage University was created in 2003, as far as I can determine.  It is not an accredited university – not even DECT – and so would not be eligible for student loans or student loan deferral.  It worries me that they say “No Degree Required”, but the lack of LSAT is pretty normal for an online school.  Here (http://online.degree.net/archive/index.php/t-708.html) it says they were going to try for DECT accreditation in 2006, but apparently they did not do so (or did not achieve accreditation).  The only accredited online law schools offering a JD which I’m aware of are Taft and Concord (again, DECT accredited).  American Heritage is inexpensive, and they do offer an FYLSX review – which is good.  Apparently they have a physical facility, and their website looks good.  The same caveats apply to this school as to any non-ABA school; make sure a degree from here will meet your needs – which is something only you can determine.  Good luck!
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: passaroa25 on October 09, 2010, 04:12:05 PM
None of these online law schools have the proper credentials.  However, if you really want a law degree, go for the cheapest online law school.  I say this because any state bar association, for  now, will give you grief for having studied law online regardless of the online law school you studied at.  But,  many state bar associations will let you sit for their bar exams if you can prove you know just as much as, or even more, than a brick and mortar, ABA approved law school graduate. 

You have to keep in mind that you will have to know much, much more than the average brick and mortar law school graduate.  And, you have to establish a reputation for knowledge of the law.  While you are studying at any one of the online law schools,  it will be very helpful to you to publish articles online on various issues of the law; either in a legal repository website or in your own blog that you make public.

Right now I am studying for a paralegal certificate because I have several degrees from brick and mortar schools.  But, I am also working on a J.D. law degree online.  To date, I have only written two articles on legal issues. One was co-authored with another paralegal student from the same school.
I will publish more within the next three years. 

Keep me posted on what you decide to do.  We can help each other get through this.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: louiebstef on October 09, 2010, 04:42:27 PM
BAD INFO.

Sorry to tell you, but as far as I know almost EVERY state will NOT let you sit for their bar exam with an online degree.  The only exception to this (generally) is California.  Even there, you should read up on what the various requirements are.

Online law schools are just money thrown away, for this very reason.  If you ever seriously intend to gain employment as an attorney, you should seek admission to an ABA law school. If you do not have the basic capability or grades/scores to gain admission to an ABA law school, you will find it rough going in the legal field and should re-allocate both your time and money.  If all you want is to be able to append "J.D." after your name, then go for it.

Good luck!
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: gallagheria on October 09, 2010, 07:02:09 PM
I noticed on the Georgia State Bar that there is at least one online grad: https://www.members.gabar.org/Custom/Directory/Default.aspx?iSession=74256e688ba74cbd998a48b3af480daa . 
Quote
Mr. Michael Barry Sheehey
Company: Comcast
Address:9770 Foxworth Drive
Alpharetta, GA 30022
Work Phone: (215) 286-5790
Fax: (215) 286-5742
Email: [email protected]
Admit Date: 12/12/2008
Law School: Concord Law School
Status: Active Member in Good Standing
Public Disciplinary History: None on Record

Member of the following sections:


    * Entertainment & Sports
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: louiebstef on October 09, 2010, 08:05:34 PM
Many state bars WILL accept you if you have practiced in California for a minimum number of years, oftentimes 5 years.
That then enables graduates of such schools as Concord to eventually practice in other states, if those states permit
reciprocity for non-ABA graduates.

I simply know that my home state, Florida, does NOT permit it.  When I considered CalBar approved schools (I used to be stationed there in the military), I did not apply because of this.

While this delayed my legal education by almost 8 years, I know it was the right choice for me.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: passaroa25 on October 11, 2010, 11:15:54 AM
An online law school graduate was allowed to sit for the Massachusetts bar. There are several cases that indicate that the judges need the plaintiff to prove that he/she really has the necessary knowledge required to be an attorney.   If you read the eligibility requirements for sitting for the bar exam, you will notice that many state bar associations are willing to review an unapproved law school graduate's ability and make a decision on a case by case basis. 
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: gallagheria on October 14, 2010, 12:37:53 PM
Actually, the Concord grad graduated in 2005 and was admitted to Georgia in 2008. So this was only three years. Georgia does not have a designated time period like some states. Florida has a ten year waiting period under 4-13.4 for non-ABA grads. In Alabama, only states that have reciprocity with Alabama's non-ABA schools for bar admission can sit for the state bar and then there is no waiting period. Otherwise, only ABA grads can sit. Currently, no states have reciprocity with Alabama so at present only ABA grads and Alabama's state accredited schools can sit for the bar. This is true whether you have practiced for 3, 5 or 10 years.

As for attending an ABA-school, that does not guarantee eligibility to sit for any state bar. This is commonly misunderstood. Cooley, for instance, only requires 60 hours. This is what the ABA allows. Some other law schools allow students admission as long as they have 3 years worth of college. In fact, the ABA specifically allows exemption from even having a bachelors if the schools deems it appropriate.  Many state bars will prohibit these ABA grads from sitting for the bar. In Alabama, you must have completed your bachelors before starting law school. It does not matter if you graduated from an ABA-school or not.

So be careful with the blanket statement that attending an ABA school allows you to sit for the state bar. Every state recognizes the accreditation of ABA schools, not necessarily the education of the particular student though who graduated from an ABA school.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: calgal27 on October 19, 2010, 06:19:57 PM
I noticed on the Georgia State Bar that there is at least one online grad: https://www.members.gabar.org/Custom/Directory/Default.aspx?iSession=74256e688ba74cbd998a48b3af480daa . 
Quote
Mr. Michael Barry Sheehey
Company: Comcast
Address:9770 Foxworth Drive
Alpharetta, GA 30022
Work Phone: (215) 286-5790
Fax: (215) 286-5742
Email: [email protected]
Admit Date: 12/12/2008
Law School: Concord Law School
Status: Active Member in Good Standing
Public Disciplinary History: None on Record

Member of the following sections:


    * Entertainment & Sports
Wow!!  I didn't know this guy could even sit for the bar here.  I wonder if he practiced in California for 5 years before he was admitted here.  I see he works for Comcast. 

There was a recent case where a lady graduated from Northwestern (another online school) but took her LLM at an ABA program.  She tried to get a waiver to sit for the Georgia Bar.  The Bar Examiner Committee asked her for specific information whether or not her online degree was just as good as an ABA degree.  She needed a letter from an ABA approved school to bring to the judge.  She did not get what he asked for so they did not let her sit for the Bar here.  She represented herself... that says something right there.

I just finished my Master's in Law & Public Policy and have an A.S in Paralegal Studies and a Bachelor's in Business.  I would love nothing more than to go to an ABA law school but while my GPA would get me into an Ivy league law school, the LSAT score won't even get me out of the gutter...lol  Plus, I am 44 years old with kids and a job.  A traditional school won't work.  Besides, I am too old to start as a first year associate somewhere.  I like the law which is what I want to study.  I am not sure I really, really want to practice law in the courts.  I just want to learn about it.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: calgal27 on October 19, 2010, 06:30:43 PM
I have an A.S. Degree in Paralegal Studies, A Bachelors Degree in Business and a I just completed a Master's Degree in Law & Public Policy.  The only reason I am looking at online law schools is that I am 44 years old so a traditional school won't work.... there are not many law schools in Georgia anyway.  With my GPA from the Bachelor's and the Master's, I can get into an Ivy League law school.  My LSAT score won't get me out of the gutter.  That is the problem. I considered taken the LSAT again since its been 5 years but I am not sure it is worth it. 

I tried Taft.  Hated it.  Did not like their program.  Looked at Northwestern.  Did not like their program either.  Considering American Heritage because they have online classes.  You have to attend class a few hours a week in live time.  California School of Law School seems to have the best program.  You actually have to go to school online twice a week.  But, they are not DETC approved so you can't get financial aid or defer the loans you already have.  American Heritage is affordable and you pay as you go.  If you don't like it, you only lose what you paid into it.  Taft took everything up front and totally screwed you when you dropped out. 

None of these online law schools have the proper credentials.  However, if you really want a law degree, go for the cheapest online law school.  I say this because any state bar association, for  now, will give you grief for having studied law online regardless of the online law school you studied at.  But,  many state bar associations will let you sit for their bar exams if you can prove you know just as much as, or even more, than a brick and mortar, ABA approved law school graduate. 

You have to keep in mind that you will have to know much, much more than the average brick and mortar law school graduate.  And, you have to establish a reputation for knowledge of the law.  While you are studying at any one of the online law schools,  it will be very helpful to you to publish articles online on various issues of the law; either in a legal repository website or in your own blog that you make public.

Right now I am studying for a paralegal certificate because I have several degrees from brick and mortar schools.  But, I am also working on a J.D. law degree online.  To date, I have only written two articles on legal issues. One was co-authored with another paralegal student from the same school.
I will publish more within the next three years. 

Keep me posted on what you decide to do.  We can help each other get through this.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: passaroa25 on October 19, 2010, 11:51:54 PM
Check out the non traditional student's section of this discussion forum.  One member graduated from a part time program at 55 years old.  If you haven't maxed out the student loan limit (like I did), check out any part time law school program near you.  What about the University of Honolulu School of Law?   It is registered with the California Board of Examiners.  The California Southern School of Law is also registered with the Board of Examiners.  Once you pass the California bar and work in California for a specific number of  years,  you can take the bar exam in New Mexico and in the District of Columbia.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: MichelleWilliams on April 18, 2011, 11:51:42 PM
American Heritage University is a good school. Their faculty are very professional and supportive.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: reformer on December 14, 2012, 01:27:24 PM
Cal Bar policy for the admission Rule 4.25/Chap 3 seems to be real headache.
The Cal Bar itself  does not practice their own law on the Eligibility. It is perhaps to serve the special interest group who support teh evaluation. I have an MS from US and yet they are giving me hard time.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: legalpractitioner on December 14, 2012, 04:52:40 PM

Yes you can take the bar after 3 years perhaps in DC but if you wait five you can motion in.  On the other hand there is no guarantee or right to take the New Mexico Bar, that is at the pleasure of their bar examiners who interpret the rules strictly.  DC is the only sure jurisdiction that an online student can count on - the rest is pure speculation and at the whim of various bars who really do not like online students as members.  Just because one person has done it at some point does not mean everyone can.

Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: Cher1300 on December 20, 2012, 09:43:30 AM
I have an A.S. Degree in Paralegal Studies, A Bachelors Degree in Business and a I just completed a Master's Degree in Law & Public Policy.  The only reason I am looking at online law schools is that I am 44 years old so a traditional school won't work.... there are not many law schools in Georgia anyway. 

Is it just your age that is preventing you from going to law school?  Because I'm 42 and just finished the first semester of my second year part time.  One of my study buddies is over 50 and was in the top 5 of our class.  Just want to be sure you are not underestimating your ability to do well in an ABA school.  I didn't do that well on my LSAT either, but had a higher gpa.  If you are within relative distance of an ABA, why not just go ahead and apply?  Many ABA's offer part-time evenings.  Although I'm not familiar with GA law schools, you really should look into GA bar requirements before doing on-line to be sure you can practice there if that is your plan.  Good luck!
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: legalpractitioner on December 20, 2012, 12:27:36 PM
Cal Bar policy for the admission Rule 4.25/Chap 3 seems to be real headache.
The Cal Bar itself  does not practice their own law on the Eligibility. It is perhaps to serve the special interest group who support teh evaluation. I have an MS from US and yet they are giving me hard time.

Rule 4.25 General education
Before beginning the study of law, a general applicant must have completed at least two years of college work or demonstrated equivalent intellectual achievement, which must be certified by the law school the applicant is attending upon request by the Committee.
(A) “Two years of college work” means a minimum of sixty semester or ninety quarter units of college credit
(1) equivalent to at least half that required for a bachelor’s degree from a college or university that has degree-granting authority from the state in which it is located; and
(2) completed with a grade average adequate for graduation.

California does not even require an Associates degree, hard to see how one could not qualify. Even a three year foreign Bachelors degree would seem adequate with an evaluation certificate.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: Rocketdog2017 on April 07, 2013, 07:47:09 AM
None of these online law schools have the proper credentials

I have a question....what are the "proper" credentials? Isn't the point of ANY law school to graduate, pass the bar exam and practice law? Once a person is an attorney it really isn't a matter of where he/she went to law school. When was the last time you asked your doctor where he/she went to medical school?...
did it change your mind on receiving medical care? 

I do agree with you regarding cost: go to the cheapest one. I will have zero debt when I graduate with my law degree.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: legalpractitioner on April 07, 2013, 10:40:50 AM
On line degrees are fine as long as you are understand that you need to first pass the California bar and the only other bar that will let you in without an act of God is  DC.

Your clients are not likely to care but opposing counsel and their clients sometimes try to make something of it.

You will also face outright hostility if you apply for a position with a law firm or govt. agency.

Therefore aside from DC and California; that online degree is not recognized as a qualifying law degree by 49 other states (give or take a few like Iowa that may make an exception with 10 years of experience).
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: cobes1996 on August 07, 2013, 08:24:48 AM
Has anyone talked any of the faculty or administrative staff at this school?  I am looking at attending an on-line school and AH looks like a good choice.  I have tried to search for alumni or information about the current staff, but I can't find anything. 
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: Maintain FL 350 on August 07, 2013, 09:42:01 AM
I have tried to search for alumni or information about the current staff, but I can't find anything.

The info regarding faculty/FYLSE/general bar exam pass rates is available on AHU's website. According to AHU, the bar exam pass rate for 2007-2012 is 0%. 

The same caveats apply to AHU that apply to all online/distance/non-ABA programs. These programs can be a good choice for the right student, but you need to fully understand the inherent limitations of such degree. As jonlevy pointed out, most states will not admit non-ABA students. I know that everyone loves to point out the handful of cases to the contrary, but those examples are few and far between.

Additionally, most employers will be suspicious about the quality of an online degree. Maybe that's unfair, but it's true nonetheless. If your goal is to take the CA bar and open a solo practice, that may not matter.

I think the main thing is just to be realistic about the implications. In my experience, then people who were bitter and disappointed after law school were the ones who had unrealistic expectations in the first place. Understand that attending an online school is going to present obstacles that traditional law schools won't, and go from there. 

Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: legalpractitioner on August 08, 2013, 06:29:02 AM
0% pass rate in five years says it all - try a DL Law School that actually graduates lawyers like Taft or Concord which also have some recognition for their JDs by other academic institutions should Plan A fail.

On the plus side, AHU has unlimited upside potential.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: cobes1996 on August 08, 2013, 06:39:39 AM
I understand the limitations of a DL school.  In my situation, I have been negotiating contracts for several years and work in an environment where everyone that performs my job is an attorney, making me the only one who isn't.  Now, you could spin this is as a good thing, but it is my opinion, my credibility with my peers is low since people view me as a "non-attorney who doesn't know the law."  I am looking to attend a DL to gain that education. I am not interested in practicing law and beening licensed in CA would not affect my job status or abilities.  Also, I live in KY and there is only three brick and mortar schools.  Only one is close and doesn't have a part-time or evening program.  So for me, its about logistics.

I do believe Concord is the better choice among DL schools. Does anybody have any idea about the cost for tuition at Concord?

Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: DeltaBravoKS on August 08, 2013, 01:19:42 PM
Concord is the most expensive--their tuition is available online (in fact, I'm not aware of any CA DL JD school that does not post tuition).

Taft is more reasonable and is (also) DETC accredited which should mean it is a nationally recognized degree (not for Bar purposes, but as an education degree).  It also has federal financial aid possibilities like most "real" colleges.  Many employers that reimburse require "accredited" degrees, which DETC should meet that purpose.

NWCU is probably the oldest and arguably most successful at producing lawyers over the years.  It is not DETC accredited, but offers the cheapest tuition for a school that continually produces lawyers.

Oak Brooke probably has the highest FYLSX and GBX pass rates and very reasonable tuition, if you can maintain the moral standards.

Good luck.  Please keep us posted as to what you decide.  Someday I may make the same decision you do!
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: legalpractitioner on August 09, 2013, 05:51:43 AM
I understand the limitations of a DL school.  In my situation, I have been negotiating contracts for several years and work in an environment where everyone that performs my job is an attorney, making me the only one who isn't.  Now, you could spin this is as a good thing, but it is my opinion, my credibility with my peers is low since people view me as a "non-attorney who doesn't know the law."  I am looking to attend a DL to gain that education. I am not interested in practicing law and beening licensed in CA would not affect my job status or abilities.  Also, I live in KY and there is only three brick and mortar schools.  Only one is close and doesn't have a part-time or evening program.  So for me, its about logistics.

Here is some good advice, I am an attorney, graduated from Taft and instruct at online schools in addition to practicing law.  Under no condition enter a JD program  without intending to become an attorney. far from being respected by your peers,  professionals like attorneys will peg you a pretentious wannabe attorney with an online degree.  By all means go to a California DL school but to continue past year one, you need to pass the baby bar, and after that ordeal which only has a 20% pass rate or so, it makes no sense not to continue to the California bar.  The non bar JD programs in my opinion are a total waste of money as they almost always unaccredited and again will simply raise red flags in the long run..

If you want a professional fully accredited degree w/out becoming an attorney it is called a MA or MS in Legal Studies and can be obtained online from regionally accredited schools like Kaplan.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: cobes1996 on August 09, 2013, 12:29:10 PM
JonLevy - Thank you for that advice.  I have every intent to become an attorney. In fact, just a JD wouldn't "get me much" in my current job.   I would say that I don't have plan to "practice law" by joining a firm or hanging my shingle, but I would like the fall back in case something were to happen with my current career. 

I would agree with you that most attorney's would snub their noses at another attorney who attended an on-line school, but the attitude with my attorney peers at my current employer is that, if you can pass the bar, then you are good in my eyes. Yes, I understand the that an on-line degree doesn't provide much respect, but it is better than what I have now.  I would say that if I only attended the JD program at a DL school and did not take the bar, the degree would provide me no additional clout, but I would plan on taking the CA bar and then apply/petition to take the bar in my home state.

I have learned life is about situations.  I have a bachelor's and two master degrees from esteemed schools.  If I could do over again, I might have chosen to attend a brick and mortar law school.  Right now, I have to take the options that are in front of me.  I am not quitting my job (can't afford to) and there are no ABA programs close to me.  DL degree is about the only choice I have. 

Thanks everyone

 
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: Maintain FL 350 on August 09, 2013, 01:32:08 PM
I understand where you're coming from. For many people, a DL degree is the only option. Some employers will be suspicious, and others won't really care. As I said before, a DL law school can be the right choice for the right kind of student.

I would strongly encourage you to research whether your state has ever admitted a DL/non-ABA/non-state bar accredited grad. For example, KY may admit grads of the TN state bar-accredited schools next door (Nashville, Lincoln Memorial), but that doesn't mean they'll admit an unaccredited DL grad. Some DL schools hold DETC or some other form of accreditation, but that usually doesn't matter for the purposes of bar admission.

The point is, you don't want to spend $30,000-$40,000 on a JD and then have to take on the state bar to get admitted. Although your state may allow you to petition, that does not mean they're obligated to admit you. Some states are slowly warming up to the idea of DL, and others are flat out hostile. If your state does not admit unaccredited students, you need to understand the uphill battle you're facing, and decide whether or not it's worth the fight.

Again, before you drop tens of thousands of dollars on a DL degree contact your state bar. Get a clear picture of what they expect. They are the only source you should trust on this issue.   
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: legalpractitioner on August 09, 2013, 04:48:53 PM
We have had a long thread on this - a California admitted DL school attorney can surely get admitted in only three other non federal jurisdictions by rights - DC after 5 years by motion, England & Wales upon satisfying the QLTS, and Ireland by passing the QLTT.  It may be possible in Iowa, New Mexico and a few others with special circumstances but I don't know of anyone who actually succeeded. If you have to resort to a petition, the odds are really against you. People here talk about petitioning a state Supreme Court like it is a routine deal; it surely is not and they don't know what they are talking about it unless they have tried it.  The few petitions by DL students that have succeeded are really one off affairs and likely can be counted on one hand.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: Rocketdog2017 on December 01, 2013, 06:57:28 AM
I'm a 1L student at American Heritage School of Law. I've been studying law schools both ABA and Non-ABA accredited for some time now (like 10 years) and I can tell you what each have to offer. Online law schools are great for working people who have other commitments like full time jobs or kids (or both) ABA schools have a system in place to evaluate, and somewhat regulate, what is taught. FT schools don't allow people to work more than 20 hours a week because they want your main focus on the law, not everything else. Online schools are somewhat different. you take fewer classes so you have more time for work and family. There are different attributes to each system.

I choose AHUSOL because I made choices several years ago that afforded financial freedom from debt. I'm a California native and older (45) than the "typical" law school school student riddled with debt and somewhat unsure financial futures. AHU allows me the freedom to take exams when I have time, not at a scheduled time that would interfere with my current work obligations. While I'm not advocating ANY particular type of law school for everyone because everyone has different situations. If I needed law school to TEACH me to argue in court or how to do any particular task not offered in an online format, I'd have gone to an ABA school; however since I've worked in the transportation industry over 25 years, I've gained nearly three decades experience in a professional setting. In my particular situation I need a law LICENSE, therefore an online law school degree works perfect for me.

In case anyone might be thinking " but what about a job afterwards".......I have two business partners (one a licensed Attorney already) who is waiting for me to pass the bar in CA so we can open our own office.  I'm going to bring business experience and working capital, another person is going to bring 17 years of previous law practice experience and another person is bringing international exposure to the table. Combined we have a solid business plan that will serve a diverse client base.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: legalpractitioner on December 02, 2013, 03:53:36 PM
Rocketdog - you must be very brave - is it true not a single grad of AHLS has ever passed the Cal Bar?  Wouldn't that be indicative of some flaw in their instructional method or curriculum? What you need is a law school that will get you past the First Year Law Student Exam.  You might want to consider your odds and supplement the curriculum being offered.  best of luck!
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: Citylaw on December 02, 2013, 09:40:01 PM
I wish you the best, but the Bar Exam will not be as flexible as American Heritage. You will have to take the Bar Exam in February or July and be ready to go.

It is interesting to hear these perspective on the online schools and I imagine it is the reason their pass rates are so much lower. It is not that the education is any worse, but at an ABA school you are forced to cram a massive amount of information for finals and they do not work around your schedule, which is stressful, but when you take the Bar Exam they cram everything into one three day test making law school finals seem like a joke.

I wish you the best on your legal education and future legal career.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: DeltaBravoKS on December 03, 2013, 03:21:37 AM
RD, please keep us updated on your progress.  I'm sure you know there are nay-sayers here that will tell you it is a tough row to hoe (and they are correct).  DL is for 'everyone' but not 'everyone' can succeed.  If you are self motivated and self disciplined, you can succeed.  If you are not, it will be easy to put off work and keep putting it off until you are too far behind (but we all know this, right?).

I wish you well and hope the nay-sayers won't keep you from logging on from time to time and sharing your experience with DL.  I still hope to do this some day and every real perspective is valuable to me.

Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: livinglegend on December 03, 2013, 07:37:05 AM
Indeed distance learning is not for everyone and for something as volumous and nuanced as the law it is even more difficult, but it can be done. You will have an uphill battle, but it is one you can win with hard work and a bit of luck.

You may want to use this board to help on your law school journey there are some great posters on this board.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: Maintain FL 350 on December 04, 2013, 10:20:54 PM
I agree that a motivated, disciplined individual can succeed by going the DL route. However, I do think that someone considering this approach should thoroughly research the schools, bar admission requirements, and both FYLSE and bar exam pass rates. Not all schools are created equal, and some have produced very few (if any) lawyers.

Do your due diligence, and go into this process with your eyes wide open.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: Maintain FL 350 on February 04, 2014, 10:59:26 PM
UPDATE

It appears that AHU had three first time bar takers for the July, 2013 bar exam, and one passer for a rate of 33%.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: DeltaBravoKS on February 05, 2014, 07:51:46 AM
Wow, 33% is pretty good for a DL school.  Uh, but wait, yes, you said it was only one person, didn't you.  AH should have not let the other two sit for this one and they'd have had a 100% rating!  Oh well.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: Maintain FL 350 on February 05, 2014, 02:11:08 PM
Yeah, many of the CBE and unaccredited schools in CA have very small numbers of people taking the bar. With such a small statistical sample it's difficult to draw any conclusions, positive or negative.
Title: Re: American Heritage University College of Law
Post by: legalpractitioner on February 05, 2014, 04:58:47 PM
That is what I call small sample.