Law School Discussion

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« on: December 30, 2007, 11:04:29 PM »
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Re: Is 2.7 a low curve?
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2007, 02:29:05 AM »
Yes, it is a low curve. Half your classmates will have a GPA below 2.7.

Does that sound good to you?

Schools offer conditional scholarships b/c they a know a certain number of students can't keep them. At many schools, the number that can't keep them is half or more. The reason they do this is so they don't have to pay out the scholarship money and can recycle it next admissions cycle, buying more students with good numbers by dangling scholarship money in from of them. If the school wanted everyone to keep the scholarship, they would offer only UNCONDITIONAL scholarships.

Getting good grades requires doing well on law school exams. In each class you will likely have 1 exam that is 100% of your grade. If you focus on preparing for class and not the exam, you will likely have problems.

ctt

Re: Is 2.7 a low curve?
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2007, 07:04:17 AM »
This is the type of conditional scholarship offer that people here warn about.  If I was in your position, I would ask what percentage of the students receive conditional scholarships like this and how many lose them after their first year.  You may also want to consider negotiating for a lower threshold for your grades to meet the minimum. 

Re: Is 2.7 a low curve?
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2007, 08:53:25 AM »
so a 3.0 is hard to get on a 2.7 curve overall?  It's only three points so it doesn't seem *that* bad... it's a merit scholarship BTW

What you need to do is ask the admissions office what the historic class rank has been that corresponds to the 3.0. Don't let them get off by saying that it varies every year. They keep detailed records, and they will be able to tell you what a 3.0 equates to in class rank. The class rank will be a more accurate reflection of how difficult it will be to maintain the scholarship.

Re: Is 2.7 a low curve?
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2007, 09:44:03 AM »
so a 3.0 is hard to get on a 2.7 curve overall?  It's only three points so it doesn't seem *that* bad... it's a merit scholarship BTW

Those three points make a huge difference.  Attaining a 3.0 on 2.7 curve is probably going to require you to be somewhere around the top third of your class.  If this is a low-ranked, expensive school I would look at other options and compare them with the assumption that you will have to pay your way through the school that is now offering you a scholarship.  Trust me, this school is giving out many more of these scholarships than they expect to have to renew.  Also, hard work won't even come close to guaranteeing good grades in law school.  There is nothing you can do to assure yourself of getting the necessary grades.  I would proceed with caution.

Re: Is 2.7 a low curve?
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2007, 10:43:46 AM »
I attended a school will a similar curve 1L year. I can assure you that there will be all sorts of "game playing" going on so that a fair amount of students can't keep the scholarship.

And even if the rank doesn't seem that bad, be aware that it really is that bad.

Go to the school if you must, just don't expect to keep the money after the first year.

El_Che

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Re: Is 2.7 a low curve?
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2007, 04:36:25 PM »
There are a few scholarships I've been offered that require a 3.0 or above, and the schools are required to give 3.0 or above to 30-45% of the class (depending on the schools). So just ask yourself if you feel lucky enough to be in the top third when grades roll around, and if you would still consider the school if you had to pay full price for 2 years.

Tetris

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Re: Is 2.7 a low curve?
« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2007, 05:10:45 PM »
Does a high LSAT for a school correlate with a higher LS GPA? For example, I'm a couple of points above Minnesota's 75th percentile which suggests that, if I attended Minnesota, that I would be in the top 10% or so of the class in terms of LSAT score. Does this mean that I would be more likely than someone with a lower LSAT score to be higher ranked? I wonder if there are any statistics on this.

rsr28

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Re: Is 2.7 a low curve?
« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2007, 05:45:05 PM »
Does a high LSAT for a school correlate with a higher LS GPA? For example, I'm a couple of points above Minnesota's 75th percentile which suggests that, if I attended Minnesota, that I would be in the top 10% or so of the class in terms of LSAT score. Does this mean that I would be more likely than someone with a lower LSAT score to be higher ranked? I wonder if there are any statistics on this.

It does not suggest that you would be in the top 10% of the class.  The correlation coefficients between LSAT and first-year grades say that 30-40% of the "errors" in first-year grades are explained by the LSAT.

Re: Is 2.7 a low curve?
« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2007, 05:55:45 PM »
El Che's logic only works if the scholarship kids are even distributed across sections. Many schools will "stack" scholarship kids disproportionately so they can eliminate more scholarships. Some schools even have the audacity to put ALL of the scholarship students in the same section, which really cuts down on having to pay out scholarships for years 2 and 3.

Billing for most law schools is by the semester. Most conditional scholarship schools would let you keep it for one year. I wouldn't be surprised if there are some that would take it away after the first semester. In fact, there is one transfer at my current school that says her old school award scholarships by each academic period, not by year.

Bottom line, read the fine print and don't expect to keep the money after the first year no matter what.

There are a few scholarships I've been offered that require a 3.0 or above, and the schools are required to give 3.0 or above to 30-45% of the class (depending on the schools). So just ask yourself if you feel lucky enough to be in the top third when grades roll around, and if you would still consider the school if you had to pay full price for 2 years.

So the scholarship would last at LEAST a year right?  They wouldn't drop it after the first semester or something?  How does billing for law schools work?