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Author Topic: Becoming a prosecutor?  (Read 730 times)

TNGA60

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Becoming a prosecutor?
« on: December 27, 2007, 09:40:42 PM »
What is the best route for becoming a prosecutor? How do they deal with the much lower salary? Does being a prosecutor qualify you for the loan remission that so many schools offer? How difficult are these jobs to land?

I am attracted to this because I think job satisfaction would be higher than most firm jobs.

big - fat - box

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Re: Becoming a prosecutor?
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2007, 10:04:48 PM »
The best route is probably attending a local state school that the office(s) you are interested in recruit / hire from.

Difficulty of getting an ADA job largely depends where you will be looking for the job but also other things like how many new lawyers the office will hire, whether that office is under a hiring freeze, etc. It all depends. DA offices also care about grades in law school. They aren't going to be looking at candidates in the bottom half of the class. Also, be advised that many DA offices will not hire until after you pass the bar. That means you'd half to pass up any job that might hire before school ends (big law firms, some govt positions, etc.).

Whether or not you qualify for an LRAP program will vary from school to school. There is no standardized LRAP progam. Some will not cover DA positions at all, but only things like legal aid. A word of warning: many LRAP programs do not have favorable terms. You will likely not be able to save any money or own any property, and if you get married, your spouse's income will likely factor into the eligibility calculations.

vap

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Re: Becoming a prosecutor?
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2007, 10:19:49 PM »
Try to limit your debt as much as possible.

TNGA60

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Re: Becoming a prosecutor?
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2007, 12:35:18 AM »
Try to limit your debt as much as possible.

So going to a lesser ranked school such as Tennessee or Florida would not limit me that much with becoming a DA? As opposed to Iowa or William & Mary.

big - fat - box

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Re: Becoming a prosecutor?
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2007, 12:49:55 AM »
Becoming a DA where? The locale is going to make quite a difference.

In general, I wouldn't bank on becoming an ADA. There is no guarantee you'll get an ADA job or even if the DA offices you're interested in will be hiring when you graduate.

Plus, you have no idea if you'd actually like being a criminal prosecutor. I know it looks glamorous and exciting on TV, but until you've done a summer at the DAs office you really don't have any idea what you're trying to get into or if you'd like it at all.

My advice: focus on schools that will be good for different things. None of the schools you've mentioned are national, so make sure you want to stay in the state or general region after graduation before committing to attend one of them. If you want to leave the ADA thing open should you decide later it's what you want to do, minimize your debt as much as possible. That means going to your local state school. If you can't do that, go to a school where you are absolutely sure you can get instate for years 2 and 3.

Try to limit your debt as much as possible.

So going to a lesser ranked school such as Tennessee or Florida would not limit me that much with becoming a DA? As opposed to Iowa or William & Mary.

HippieLawChick

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Re: Becoming a prosecutor?
« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2007, 05:04:01 PM »
The debt issue shouldn't be that bad if you plan on keeping that job for 10 years.  Check out the information on the College Cost Reducation and Access Act of 2007 (Passed this fall) which provides for loan forgiveness for prosecutors after 10 years. The Equal Justice Works website has a ton of info on this.