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Author Topic: Any long-distance runners?  (Read 1050 times)

the marauder

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Re: Any long-distance runners?
« Reply #10 on: December 11, 2007, 10:11:48 PM »
Slow down your pace a bit and DO NOT walk.  The only way to train your body to get past that initial discomfort is to fight through the urge to walk. 
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MHLM

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Re: Any long-distance runners?
« Reply #11 on: December 11, 2007, 10:16:46 PM »
Slow down your pace a bit and DO NOT walk.  The only way to train your body to get past that initial discomfort is to fight through the urge to walk. 

Ahhh OK I assumed this would be the answer. Is it advisable to avoid hilly areas? I would think, at least initially, it would be best for me to run on a flat surface...does it make a difference?

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the marauder

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Re: Any long-distance runners?
« Reply #12 on: December 11, 2007, 10:26:00 PM »
I struggle more with hills than anything, which is one of the reasons I'm better on the track than at cross country.  Run on flat ground if you can.
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BigLulz

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Re: Any long-distance runners?
« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2007, 11:39:50 PM »
EDIT: I reread your post.

I'm surprised that you still hit that wall at two minutes.

Are you strictly limiting your walking time and making a habit it out of it, or just allowing yourself to walk when you feel like you're too tired? It sounds to me like you're verging on interval training, but you're not keeping your timing disciplined, so your body thinks that it's ok to walk whenever you feel tired.

Interval training works well, but you have to be good about the timing - having a watch helps. For example, the first day you might tell yourself that you'll exercise for 40 minutes, alternating one minute running, then one minute walking. When you're comfortable with this, move up to 40 minutes of running for two minutes, walking for one, etc. until you can comfortably run without having to take frequent walking breaks.

http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/tipsandtricks/a/Intervals.htm

My friend used this method when she first started running and she ran her first marathon last year - she's running another one this year, too.
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1s2io72

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Re: Any long-distance runners?
« Reply #14 on: December 12, 2007, 12:04:19 AM »
I just started running 5K runs on weekends.  It's the only outdoor running I do; the rest is indoors on a cybex.  Try a couple of those even if you haven't started running much.  You'll get a feel for where you are. 

MHLM

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Re: Any long-distance runners?
« Reply #15 on: December 12, 2007, 08:09:06 AM »
EDIT: I reread your post.

I'm surprised that you still hit that wall at two minutes.

Are you strictly limiting your walking time and making a habit it out of it, or just allowing yourself to walk when you feel like you're too tired? It sounds to me like you're verging on interval training, but you're not keeping your timing disciplined, so your body thinks that it's ok to walk whenever you feel tired.

Interval training works well, but you have to be good about the timing - having a watch helps. For example, the first day you might tell yourself that you'll exercise for 40 minutes, alternating one minute running, then one minute walking. When you're comfortable with this, move up to 40 minutes of running for two minutes, walking for one, etc. until you can comfortably run without having to take frequent walking breaks.

http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/tipsandtricks/a/Intervals.htm

My friend used this method when she first started running and she ran her first marathon last year - she's running another one this year, too.

Hey, thanks for the info! I wasn't consciously interval training but I guess by virtue of habit that's what I was doing. I suppose the 2-minute run, then walk a minute cycle formed somewhat out of repetition. I guess because I never got completely "comfortable" with the running part I didn't try to push myself and run for longer. So it's my own fault, but I like the idea of equal amounts of time running and walking--starting with a minute of each and working up. Do you have any advice about how to train using a treadmill/elliptical (i.e. MPH) because it's starting to get icy where I am and I have a feeling I'll be forced to move it indoors on some days. You guys are giving me hope! What is a cybex?

Slumdog Lovebutton

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Re: Any long-distance runners?
« Reply #16 on: December 12, 2007, 10:19:10 AM »
Start off your first week doing this. 

MON-20 min
TUES-25 min
WED-20 min
Thurs-30 min
Fri-25 min
Sat-OFF
Sun-30 min

Does that sound reasonable? Are you inclined to run 6 days a week? More, less?

This looks about right.  I'm going to have to do a bit of research online about training techniques as well, since I'm not sure if I should be running every day or three/four times per week.
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UnbiasedObserver

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Re: Any long-distance runners?
« Reply #17 on: December 12, 2007, 11:11:22 AM »
Start off your first week doing this. 

MON-20 min
TUES-25 min
WED-20 min
Thurs-30 min
Fri-25 min
Sat-OFF
Sun-30 min

Does that sound reasonable? Are you inclined to run 6 days a week? More, less?

This looks about right.  I'm going to have to do a bit of research online about training techniques as well, since I'm not sure if I should be running every day or three/four times per week.

It depends.  If you have really ever run before, 3-4 days a week may be best.  You may be very sore the first few times; however, eventually this soreness wears off quickly.  Of course, every person is different.

And I second the notion to run a 5k or two leading up to the race.  5ks are very low-stress, as a variety of people run them. 

Also, if you're serious about this race, I might suggest finding a local running club.  People tend to think that they only attract elite runners--but often they have runners of all abilities, looking for training partners of their own abilities. 

Tesoro418

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Re: Any long-distance runners?
« Reply #18 on: December 12, 2007, 11:40:43 AM »
What I have found to help with running (I run half marathons), is going to the gym and doing either the stairmaster/climber.  It helps build up those muscles, while at the same time helping you acclimate to hills.

Other than that, you just need to put in the mileage and work through the wall.  Go slowly if need be.  Good luck!
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Slumdog Lovebutton

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Re: Any long-distance runners?
« Reply #19 on: December 12, 2007, 11:41:42 AM »
Also, if you're serious about this race, I might suggest finding a local running club.  People tend to think that they only attract elite runners--but often they have runners of all abilities, looking for training partners of their own abilities. 

I'm serious about finishing it, but I have absolutely no intention of trying to win.  I'm going to to the best I can, speed-wise, but the main goal is just to finish.

I've got a few friends who will be running it with me, so we might form our own teeny running club of sorts, but it's not a bad idea to find one locally.  I'm always down to meet new people, anyway :)


What I have found to help with running (I run half marathons), is going to the gym and doing either the stairmaster/climber.  It helps build up those muscles, while at the same time helping you acclimate to hills.

Other than that, you just need to put in the mileage and work through the wall.  Go slowly if need be.  Good luck!

Thanks!
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