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Author Topic: reverse splitter?  (Read 1168 times)

TNGA60

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reverse splitter?
« on: December 10, 2007, 05:55:34 PM »
I am wondering what the application options are for someone who has a LSAT score lower than their GPA would warrant. I will graduate in less than a week and it should be with a 4.0. I took the 12/1 LSAT and while I was scoring around 169 on PTs I feel that I might score in the mid 160s b/c I had to guess on a reading passage. Also my GPA is not from any particularly prestigious college.

So should I use my LSAT as a guide for applying or will my GPA increase my chances? If I score a 166 do I have a good shot at a school with a 25% 166? Or should my targets be schools with 166 medians?

Thanks to anyone with insight.

devilishlyblue

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Re: reverse splitter?
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2007, 05:59:06 PM »
Probably best to wait until you have an actual score, then play around with calculators to get a sense for your odds.  They come back in about two weeks?

TNGA60

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Re: reverse splitter?
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2007, 06:01:58 PM »
That is good advice but I think the calculators are not quite accurate when your GPA is a 4.0. Also I want to be ready to go complete when I receive my score.

TrumpWho??

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Re: reverse splitter?
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2007, 06:04:28 PM »
If you search LSN for law schools with your numbers you have the best shot at t-14 schools statistically. Most people who get into the top 14 with a 166 is someone with 3.9+. I would say that you would be able to get into 50% of schools in the 8-14 rankings.

Majmun

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Re: reverse splitter?
« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2007, 06:05:26 PM »
This is a futile effort until you get your actual score.  The schools you have a decent shot at will vary greatly depending on your actual score (ie there is a huge differnce in prospects between a 4.0 167 and a 4.0 163/164)

TNGA60

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Re: reverse splitter?
« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2007, 06:16:59 PM »
This is a futile effort until you get your actual score.  The schools you have a decent shot at will vary greatly depending on your actual score (ie there is a huge difference in prospects between a 4.0 167 and a 4.0 163/164)

Yes, I understand that I cannot make a definitive list of schools without a score. I just want to know if I can target schools who's LSAT median is a couple points higher than my score, once I get it.

JeNeSaisLaw

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Re: reverse splitter?
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2007, 06:25:22 PM »
Here's what I did. I wrote down a bunch of numbers I might have scored and listed which schools I would apply to given certain scores. I planned for as low as 160 and as high as 167-- I didn't feel like be "true to myself"...that is, I was anticipating only so high so I wasn't disappointed if my score came back lower.

Anyhow, this might be something good for you to do. I know your question was about which schools, but this might allow you to do that yourself. After all, we'd just use the same numbers you have available.  It's actually a lot of fun... :P I used my gf's colorful sharpies.
LSN
Vanderbilt Class of 2011

indyguy7484

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Re: reverse splitter?
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2007, 06:26:02 PM »
This is a futile effort until you get your actual score.  The schools you have a decent shot at will vary greatly depending on your actual score (ie there is a huge difference in prospects between a 4.0 167 and a 4.0 163/164)

Yes, I understand that I cannot make a definitive list of schools without a score. I just want to know if I can target schools who's LSAT median is a couple points higher than my score, once I get it.

You probably can't target them, although they would be a solid reach.  It really depends on the school, your score, and also the circumstances surrounding your 4.0.  What was your major?  Was your SAT score a poor predictor of your college performance?  If you can prove you have poor history on standardized tests, you might have a higher range of schools to consider targets.  

TNGA60

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Re: reverse splitter?
« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2007, 07:05:59 PM »
This is a futile effort until you get your actual score.  The schools you have a decent shot at will vary greatly depending on your actual score (ie there is a huge difference in prospects between a 4.0 167 and a 4.0 163/164)

Yes, I understand that I cannot make a definitive list of schools without a score. I just want to know if I can target schools who's LSAT median is a couple points higher than my score, once I get it.

You probably can't target them, although they would be a solid reach.  It really depends on the school, your score, and also the circumstances surrounding your 4.0.  What was your major?  Was your SAT score a poor predictor of your college performance?  If you can prove you have poor history on standardized tests, you might have a higher range of schools to consider targets. 

My major is Political Science, so no free points there. My ACT score was a 25, I think that could be considered a poor predictor of my capabilities.

indyguy7484

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Re: reverse splitter?
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2007, 07:21:22 PM »
I would say be sure to attach an addendum with documented proof of your ACT score as evidence of a poor standardized testing history regardless of your LSAT score.  Some schools (Boalt comes to mind) are willing to overlook lower LSATs given a valid mitigating factor.  Aside from that, there isn't anything you can do until you have your score.  Check back in a few weeks.