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Author Topic: First Cold LSAT  (Read 1536 times)

Kevin.

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Re: First Cold LSAT
« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2007, 11:06:38 PM »
Depends on how you categorize them, because each big category has a few sub-categories (for example, sequencing games can be strict or loose,) but depending on who you ask, there are anywhere between 4 and 10 I'd say.  Certainly no more than 10.

ETA:  The consensus from most prep companies seems to be that there are 5 big categories:  Sequencing, Matching, Selection, Distribution, and Hybrids.
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the marauder

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Re: First Cold LSAT
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2007, 12:00:27 AM »
What can be a reasonable score increase if I learn all of these, considering that almost all of my wrong answers came from this section?
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traydeuce

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Re: First Cold LSAT
« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2007, 12:23:37 AM »
So, essentially you're saying there is a way to learn the way the games work, and as long as I can memorize what to do in each situation I can get them right?  I understand I might screw up and not get them all right, but there is a way to learn them effectively?

Perhaps. Personally I just took about 20 games sections and went from being pretty slow and decent to really good and quick. You may find that the methods they teach in the books are too time-consuming or don't work for you.

Phineas

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Re: First Cold LSAT
« Reply #13 on: December 08, 2007, 02:59:33 AM »
So, essentially you're saying there is a way to learn the way the games work, and as long as I can memorize what to do in each situation I can get them right?  I understand I might screw up and not get them all right, but there is a way to learn them effectively?

This is a dumb question.

the marauder

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Re: First Cold LSAT
« Reply #14 on: December 08, 2007, 03:00:59 AM »

This is a dumb question.
[/quote]

How so?
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Phineas

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Re: First Cold LSAT
« Reply #15 on: December 08, 2007, 04:03:19 AM »

This is a dumb question.

How so?
[/quote]

Is there a way to learn them effectively?  Uh, no.  No way to learn them.  Might as well just stop studying now.

Kevin.

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Re: First Cold LSAT
« Reply #16 on: December 08, 2007, 08:31:31 AM »
Go make some errant marks on your answer sheet, bro.  Shut up.

TITCR.

As far as a score increase, it depends on what's dragging your score from a 180 to a 164 now.  If it's mostly logic games, and you can master those, you stand to improve by quite a bit.  Just look at the scale you used to score your test and see what you would have gotten if you got a certain number more right in the LG section, and play around to see what theoretically your increase could be.
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Just_Chexin

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Re: First Cold LSAT
« Reply #17 on: December 08, 2007, 09:39:08 AM »
Quote
Quote from: the marauder on Yesterday at 10:51:45 PM
So, essentially you're saying there is a way to learn the way the games work, and as long as I can memorize what to do in each situation I can get them right?  I understand I might screw up and not get them all right, but there is a way to learn them effectively?

I am just in the beginning of this process, so I am probably not the best person to comment, but my main weakness also lies in the 'Logical Games' section of the LSAT.

To that end, so far, Powerscore's Logical Games Bible has been like a miracle for me. I'm only partially through it, but already it has me seeing and understanding games in a much more practical light.  I started out with Princeton Review's Cracking the LSAT: 2008, but their games methods left me extremely confused. I was all but ready to give up on this section until I got Powerscore's book.  Their techniques alone are teaching me how to approach and solve games. I'd highly recommend their book!

CrnchyCereal

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Re: First Cold LSAT
« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2007, 01:59:28 AM »
A 164 baseline is excellent, no doubt about it.  My very first real diagnostic was a 161, and that was after having gone through PR's "Cracking the LSAT" book (which I do not recommend).  Similar to yourself, my main weakness was LG, and I hammered away at it for over three months.  Suffice to say, I made a pretty dramatic improvement by the time I took the real thing.

jamie9

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Re: First Cold LSAT
« Reply #19 on: December 09, 2007, 03:22:12 AM »
Just to add my 2 cents, I got a 164 on my first test cold too, 178 on the real thing (1 stupid mistake off 180  >:( ).

Just do a lot of preptests, at least 15-20 at a very minimum, reviewing all mistakes and questions that gave you trouble, and you should do very well.  The only thing I can say I really learned from my "class" and books was how to quickly form contrapositives in formal logic, the LSAT is mostly a reflection of practice and innate ability.

As for the person who only took a couple preptests and stayed at a 166...that's all well and good, but a few in I hit a 161, would have hated for that to be test day.

Everyone scores poorly LG their first time, I had in the 40% right range on the diag, didn't miss a single one on the real thing (Sept 07) despite only taking 15 minutes, and by the time I'd taken 10-12 tests, if I missed 1 it was rare and because I'd simply made an oversight.  LG is really easy to learn, it just takes a lot of repetition to spot the same patterns, learn to diagram properly, and get your pace up.  If you can get most right on LR, chances are you can dominate LG too.

Get the LG bible to help diagram a bit, but don't feel bound to do exactly what they say.  Once you get used to it, just do your own thing.  Don't bother memorizing a step-by-step process or any of that BS, that just takes up your time if you're already scoring at a high level.