Law School Discussion

former drug addict

Re: former drug addict
« Reply #10 on: December 27, 2007, 04:02:05 PM »
if i am applying to many schools in different states, which bar association should i contact?  and what should i ask them? 

Re: former drug addict
« Reply #11 on: December 27, 2007, 06:57:33 PM »
if i am applying to many schools in different states, which bar association should i contact?  and what should i ask them? 

I would tell them about all of the trouble you have been in, both financially and legally, and ask them if anything would be a "dealbreaker" for them. 

Matthew

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Re: former drug addict
« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2007, 03:17:29 AM »
CONTACT THE BAR FIRST! There is no reason to drop $100+ plus on a law degree if you cannot pass the bar. And don't trust a LS acceptance to mean that you can be admitted to the bar. It is your responsibility to find out if this will be a big obstacle to the Bar before going to LS.

I'd say it might be worth more than $100, but I'd start thinking so at around $1,000.

Re: former drug addict
« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2007, 07:00:59 AM »
Stop trying to flame the board dude...

Re: former drug addict
« Reply #14 on: December 28, 2007, 09:49:50 AM »
if i am applying to many schools in different states, which bar association should i contact? 

If you know where you want to eventually practice, talk to that bar association. If you don't, I'd probably call up a few major states, say, NY, CA, and TX. These folks might be of some help, as well.

gclemen1

Re: former drug addict
« Reply #15 on: December 28, 2007, 10:32:45 AM »
yep, I think the check fraud would be worse.  Any kind of fraud or theft is difficult for the BAR to overcome b/c of the ethical standards of attorneys.  I would definitely call up your state bar and ask a lot of questions b/c going into huge debt and not being able to pass the bar is a terrible thing!

Re: former drug addict
« Reply #16 on: December 28, 2007, 10:17:42 PM »
i'll contact the NCBE, thanks polynomial...but isn't LS acceptance a pretty good indicator of bar passage, considering that they want their bar passage numbers to be as high as possible, and shouldn't accept you knowing you would probably fail right? (i'm talking tier 1 schools, and i know there are some illogical presumptions in that question) take UW-Madison for example, acceptance (and subsequent completion) of their LS guarantees bar acceptance...

Re: former drug addict
« Reply #17 on: December 28, 2007, 10:38:28 PM »
i'll contact the NCBE, thanks polynomial...but isn't LS acceptance a pretty good indicator of bar passage, considering that they want their bar passage numbers to be as high as possible, and shouldn't accept you knowing you would probably fail right? (i'm talking tier 1 schools, and i know there are some illogical presumptions in that question) take UW-Madison for example, acceptance (and subsequent completion) of their LS guarantees bar acceptance...

But isn't being granted a mortgage is a pretty good indicator that you'll pay it back because considering how much money they are giving you they wouldn't give you that money knowing you would default right? (I'm talking the national mortgage lenders like Countrywide)

Re: former drug addict
« Reply #18 on: December 28, 2007, 10:43:53 PM »
if you want to play "pick apart the question" you'll need to see the disclaimer i posted IN THE QUESTION.  and just to play devil's advocate: lenders don't rely on "mortgage paid off" statistics by lendees to attract future lendees to borrow from them. also, schools rely on alumni from their law schools (presumably those who PASS THE BAR) to return and invest in the community both academically and, especially, financially. what i'm trying to say is that it seems there is a much closer link between law schools, students, and the bar, and that there is some sort of implied responsibility on the school's part not to just take your money and leave you hanging...

Re: former drug addict
« Reply #19 on: December 28, 2007, 11:04:37 PM »
if you want to play "pick apart the question" you'll need to see the disclaimer i posted IN THE QUESTION.  and just to play devil's advocate: lenders don't rely on "mortgage paid off" statistics by lendees to attract future lendees to borrow from them. also, schools rely on alumni from their law schools (presumably those who PASS THE BAR) to return and invest in the community both academically and, especially, financially. what i'm trying to say is that it seems there is a much closer link between law schools, students, and the bar, and that there is some sort of implied responsibility on the school's part not to just take your money and leave you hanging...

I would not make that assumption with any of the private schools, and most of the public ones also.  Call me cynical.  Passing the bar and meeting the state's C&F requirements is your responsibility, not theirs.