Law School Discussion

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Re: Liberal Arts Majors: Any Regrets?
« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2007, 10:26:49 AM »
my point isnt that ppl should 'care' that youre educated, what you can do with the intelligence that the education gave you is what you have to make the employers see.  the bottom line is that there are tons of LA majors how got their foot in the door in a field and worked their way to higher positions.  crying about what ppl won't give you doesnt get the job done. i come on here everyday and i find ppl that are feeling sorry about their situations. well there are a lot of ppl who work 16 hours a day, 7 days a week, who dont bi+ch as much as a lot of the ppl on these boards. your have a college degree but that doesnt mean the world is yours, you still have to prove youself with a little hard work first.

ilsox7

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Re: Liberal Arts Majors: Any Regrets?
« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2007, 10:32:30 AM »
Most of the business majors I know couldn't write their way out of a paper bag.  But since they learn how to add and subtract using Excel, they get all the "good" jobs.  I would hate to be a finance monkey.

I have really good opportunity for advancement at this job, but unfortunately it's the most mind-numbingly boring sh*t I could possibly imagine.  Probably a lot like law.
Your perception of finance is wrong on many levels.

MHLM

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Re: Liberal Arts Majors: Any Regrets?
« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2007, 10:38:21 AM »
I wouldn't trade in my liberal arts degree for anything. I started out as a business major and just hated it...to me it seemed like half common sense, half garbage (although I did have some really interesting biz classes--econ for instance--and ended up with a minor in business). I switched my major to poli sci and am confident that this was the right decision, as it led me to read interesting works, consider different ideas, hone my writing skills, and think about things from varied perspectives. So, on to law school I go with my lib arts degree, which I think will prove pretty helpful in my graduate studies. We shall see...

papercranes

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Re: Liberal Arts Majors: Any Regrets?
« Reply #13 on: November 29, 2007, 10:40:46 AM »
my degree was part fine arts, part liberal arts and I would do it all over again if I had to. I loved it. I've had some amazing opportunities because of it.

my job right now pays decently, but could probably be done by a monkey. Oh well. I would rather stick this out than have spent four years of UG learning how to be an acountant and then have to spend the rest of my life being an accountant. no offence to accountants.

ilsox7

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Re: Liberal Arts Majors: Any Regrets?
« Reply #14 on: November 29, 2007, 10:45:49 AM »
Your perception of finance is wrong on many levels.

I love when you write these one-line posts telling other people they're wrong.  So helpful.

Well, you're wrong.  You think that finance professionals simply add and subtract using excel.  That's an ignorant thing to say, so what would you expect my response to be?  Do you want me to walk this thread through some basic finance skills that finance professionals know and use on a regular basis that go beyond adding and subtracting on excel?  Quite frankly, unless you like finance, that would be quite boring.  So by keeping it concise and just pointing out the error of your post, I accomplished the same thing.

You don't see me in here ripping people who were history or polysci majors, yet you feel like you know it all about something you probably have zero exposure to.

I'm also trying to figure out where all of these "one-line posts telling people they are wrong" are.  I don't even have that many posts on this forum.  And most of the ones I do have discuss what law school is actually like, the current job market, and the different alternatives out there to big law. 

papercranes

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Re: Liberal Arts Majors: Any Regrets?
« Reply #15 on: November 29, 2007, 10:47:55 AM »
my degree was part fine arts, part liberal arts and I would do it all over again if I had to. I loved it. I've had some amazing opportunities because of it.

my job right now pays decently, but could probably be done by a retarded monkey. Oh well. I would rather stick this out than have spent four years of UG learning how to be an acountant and then have to spend the rest of my life being an accountant. no offence to accountants.

fixed

thanks. that was helpful,
it's more accurate now. ::)

ilsox7

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Re: Liberal Arts Majors: Any Regrets?
« Reply #16 on: November 29, 2007, 10:57:19 AM »
Your perception of finance is wrong on many levels.

I love when you write these one-line posts telling other people they're wrong.  So helpful.

Well, you're wrong.  You think that finance professionals simply add and subtract using excel.  That's an ignorant thing to say, so what would you expect my response to be?  Do you want me to walk this thread through some basic finance skills that finance professionals know and use on a regular basis that go beyond adding and subtracting on excel?  Quite frankly, unless you like finance, that would be quite boring.  So by keeping it concise and just pointing out the error of your post, I accomplished the same thing.

You don't see me in here ripping people who were history or polysci majors, yet you feel like you know it all about something you probably have zero exposure to.

I'm also trying to figure out where all of these "one-line posts telling people they are wrong" are.  I don't even have that many posts on this forum.  And most of the ones I do have discuss what law school is actually like, the current job market, and the different alternatives out there to big law. 

Is it that hard to tell the difference between reality and hyperbole?  Do I really think that finance majors spend four years learning how to add and subtract using Excel?  Of course not.  They have to learn vlookup as well.
Well, you obviously have a bone to pick with people who majored in something that gave them skills that employers desire.  Just b/c you chose a different route does not mean you should pretend to understand what others do and then criticize it.

Also, I know plenty of people who did not major in business or something similar who found good jobs after college.  They worked their ass off, networked, met a lot of people, and finally had something come through.  It's not easy, but if you work hard enough at it, the jobs are out there.

EDIT: Saw your edit.  Again, I am not looking for a fight here.  All I am saying is that finance majors actually learn a lot of things beyond excel. 

ilsox7

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Re: Liberal Arts Majors: Any Regrets?
« Reply #17 on: November 29, 2007, 11:05:00 AM »

Where did they network?  It's not as if your fellow English majors are useful.


It depends what you want to do.  There are a few starting points for networking.  The easiest one for most people is to start with family and family friends.  If there is ANYONE in that immediate network who either does something that you'd be interested in or works at a company that has a department you'd be interested in, talk to them.  Ask them out for lunch or coffee.  Ask them what they do.  Just don't go looking for a job.  The goal is to create relationships.  And these people will know other people that you can talk to.

If you're in a major market, there are often organizations like Toastmasters.  That particular organization focuses on becoming a better public speaker.  More importantly, it's a way to get to know people.  If you have any friends who were business majors and are at professional jobs, talk to them.  Again, they should know other people, too.

It's an arduous process and it will take time, but it's generally successful. 

I know some people who sat down and made a list of 50 people they knew.  They then contacted those people and from that got X more names.  You keep going until you figure out what you want to do and an opportunity arises.  Again, it's not an easy process.  And you have to be willing to face rejection and waiting.  All in all, be humble about it, don't ask everyone for a job, and just stay persistent.

gowi

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Re: Liberal Arts Majors: Any Regrets?
« Reply #18 on: November 29, 2007, 11:05:29 AM »
This thread is a prime example why my generation (people born between 1980 and 1985) is being renamed the "I" generation.

My undergrad institution did an excellent job requiring ALL of its majors from theater to engineering take a "core" set of classes that included writing, literature, fine arts, history, math, statistics, business, computers, and social science. No one graduated without being able to write or talk themselves out of a paper bag, not even the fashion majors. I thought most universities did this. And the reason the engineers have such an easy time finding jobs paying $50k+ is because most of us worked during undergrad doing internships and co-oping. Even the engineering majors who didn't work had a harder time finding jobs upon graduation.

Re: Liberal Arts Majors: Any Regrets?
« Reply #19 on: November 29, 2007, 11:06:27 AM »
my point isnt that ppl should 'care' that youre educated, what you can do with the intelligence that the education gave you is what you have to make the employers see.  the bottom line is that there are tons of LA majors how got their foot in the door in a field and worked their way to higher positions.  crying about what ppl won't give you doesnt get the job done. i come on here everyday and i find ppl that are feeling sorry about their situations. well there are a lot of ppl who work 16 hours a day, 7 days a week, who dont bi+ch as much as a lot of the ppl on these boards. your have a college degree but that doesnt mean the world is yours, you still have to prove youself with a little hard work first.

I think that most people that are frustrated are those that did and are working their asses off, and still can't find the break.

Duder, I worked 45 hours a week manual labor while going to school full time. I had that job up until about six months ago, when I decided to enter the professional market. I can always go back to the manual labor job - hard work doesn't scare me. It was a job I liked that paid me well during school and worked around my schedule. Should I have spent my time pursuing internships and building my resume during school? Sure - but some of us don't have the luxury.

I find it somewhat hilarious that you describe this board as a few people bitching because they can't find a job - law school is chock full of these type of people. People who want a better job, who couldn't find a decent job before law school, and/or wouldn't settle on working sh*t jobs. You can't tell me law school is full of people who "love the law" - what a load of sh*t that is. They see a chance for more money, or a more practical, tangible form of graduate school. Which is why, granted, most lawyers are depressed as hell. But I suppose at least they're well compensated and have a bit more opportunity than they had before law school.



if youre going to law school because you cant find another job, then you cant be helped, you will fail.  you may succeed in law school, you may succeed in being a lawyer, but youre gonna fail at life bc youre going to hate it.  if youre willing to do anything for money, there are better ways than law school, im not saying that you have to go to law school out of some secreat unwavering love of the law as an idea, but man, its gotta interest you a bit.  youre gonna spend 3 years of not getting paid, and an additionally 100 to 150k because you cant find anything else?  bad call.