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Author Topic: When people talk about "nice" versus "bad" neighborhoods  (Read 5347 times)

UCILS

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When people talk about "nice" versus "bad" neighborhoods
« on: November 24, 2007, 12:20:26 PM »
is the overriding consideration race?  i think that in general, people use wealth as a proxy for safety and race as a proxy for race.  but most people are probably in flat-out denial about the fact that they do this because racism is such a frowned-upon trait.  what do others think?

UCILS

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Re: When people talk about "nice" versus "bad" neighborhoods
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2007, 12:26:52 PM »
race? class?  what does it matter?

safe is safe and unsafe is unsafe.  look up the neighborhood crime stats not what the people or houses look like.

um, what i said was that people don't do this.  they look at race because it's easier to do than looking at crime stats.

UCILS

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Re: When people talk about "nice" versus "bad" neighborhoods
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2007, 12:36:10 PM »
that's so funny.

UCILS

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Re: When people talk about "nice" versus "bad" neighborhoods
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2007, 12:40:40 PM »
that's so funny.

I thought it was the same as your point! And so catchy!

Or I just like puppet sex...

well it was.

what's also great: "hey, you're [race]!  there's a [race] girl in my psych class!  you two should get together!"

>:(

treefity350

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Re: When people talk about "nice" versus "bad" neighborhoods
« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2007, 01:47:41 PM »
"And both wealth and race factor into that"

Really? I think it is just wealth. If I'm driving through a neighborhood full of huge houses I don't care at all if I see a whole bunch of black and latino people standing outside - which I probably wouldn't, because wealthy people tend to stay in their homes more, in my experience - I'm still going to assume it is a good neighborhood.  Furthermore, if you take a neighborhood like that I live in, which is low to middle income, it happens to be a majority white neighborhood, but their are other parts of town that LOOK (in terms of quality of the homes) just like it, but happen to be predominently black, and the homes there are worth about the same.

I think that the very worst neighborhoods do tend to be, for the most part, almost entirely minority occupied, but this is b/c it is a fact of American society, which needs to be adressed, that minorities tend to have the lowest incomes, and these neighborhoods are the cheapest and have the homes that are in the worst shape.

To recognize this does not imply racism on my part, and it is natural that I would rather not live in a bad neighborhood. I happen to be white, but if I were black and had the means to stay out of a neighborhood in which crimes rates were high, I can assure you I would do so.
Remember when I was at the picnic - the company picnic - and I hit the ball over the fence? You guys didn't think I'd catch it too but I did. I'm fast as s**t - 17 stolen bases in '72, 18 in '91.

treefity350

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Re: When people talk about "nice" versus "bad" neighborhoods
« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2007, 02:02:45 PM »
Yeah, whats funny? Are you laughing at my assumption that black people would like to stay out of high crime rate neighborhoods as much as white people funny? Who is the racist?
Remember when I was at the picnic - the company picnic - and I hit the ball over the fence? You guys didn't think I'd catch it too but I did. I'm fast as s**t - 17 stolen bases in '72, 18 in '91.

treefity350

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Re: When people talk about "nice" versus "bad" neighborhoods
« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2007, 02:35:23 PM »
I don't really think so. in fact, i think that one of the main benefits of realizing all people are the same (in the same way as two white people are the same) is that you can empathize with those of other races without thinking that their is some fundamental difference that separates you.
Remember when I was at the picnic - the company picnic - and I hit the ball over the fence? You guys didn't think I'd catch it too but I did. I'm fast as s**t - 17 stolen bases in '72, 18 in '91.

mugatu

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Re: When people talk about "nice" versus "bad" neighborhoods
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2007, 02:47:17 PM »
I don't really think so. in fact, i think that one of the main benefits of realizing all people are the same (in the same way as two white people are the same) is that you can empathize with those of other races without thinking that their is some fundamental difference that separates you.

You're correct, of course, in that people are all the same.  So, in general and as a rule, holding this refrain is a good one.

It is more difficult when you, not having been subject to years of subtle racism, try to then empathize with that experience.  (To extend: perhaps the neighborhood crime rate would be reduced, but the racist feelings would increase.)
Let me show you Derelicte. It is a fashion, a way of life inspired by the very homeless, the vagrants, the crack whores that make this wonderful city so unique.

They're break-dance fighting.

treefity350

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Re: When people talk about "nice" versus "bad" neighborhoods
« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2007, 02:59:11 PM »
I am not trying to empathize specifically with the experience of being black in America, but I think that the decision that you would rather live in a neighborhood that has less crime is something independent of race.

I imagine (and I know that this is a little bit questionable, but just to try and understand) that the feeling is something like the way I feel when it becomes known to a class full of Christians that I am an atheist. There are many who don't care at all, and I can spot these, but there are also those who, though on the surface they treat me exactly the same as before, have a different attitude towards me. And then, occasionally, there are those who wish to take me to task. This, I think, would be somewhat similar, except that I don't announce that I am an atheist just by walking down the street. I imagine that having to deal with this sort of behavior on a daily basis would be very difficult, but I can't see that it should really shape your identity unless you allow it to.
Remember when I was at the picnic - the company picnic - and I hit the ball over the fence? You guys didn't think I'd catch it too but I did. I'm fast as s**t - 17 stolen bases in '72, 18 in '91.

mugatu

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Re: When people talk about "nice" versus "bad" neighborhoods
« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2007, 03:44:47 PM »
I am not trying to empathize specifically with the experience of being black in America, but I think that the decision that you would rather live in a neighborhood that has less crime is something independent of race.

I imagine (and I know that this is a little bit questionable, but just to try and understand) that the feeling is something like the way I feel when it becomes known to a class full of Christians that I am an atheist. There are many who don't care at all, and I can spot these, but there are also those who, though on the surface they treat me exactly the same as before, have a different attitude towards me. And then, occasionally, there are those who wish to take me to task. This, I think, would be somewhat similar, except that I don't announce that I am an atheist just by walking down the street. I imagine that having to deal with this sort of behavior on a daily basis would be very difficult, but I can't see that it should really shape your identity unless you allow it to.

fair enough, but my take and understanding of race is that it is far more pervasive to one's psyche than anyone would really wish.  (what luke said)
Let me show you Derelicte. It is a fashion, a way of life inspired by the very homeless, the vagrants, the crack whores that make this wonderful city so unique.

They're break-dance fighting.