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Author Topic: High UPGA/Low LSAC Calculated GPA/Low LSAT Score  (Read 2461 times)

ladytaskmaster

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High UPGA/Low LSAC Calculated GPA/Low LSAT Score
« on: November 13, 2007, 09:28:03 AM »
Greetings!

I have applied to law school for the 2008 admissions cycle and listed Cleveland Marshall College of Law (Part-Time program) as my first choice.  I am applying through their Legal Career Opportunities Program because of GPA/LSAT issues.  I dropped out of college in the '80's due to academic suspension and joined the military.  After several years in the USAF, I worked for 12 years as a paramedic and other areas of health care before returning to college in 2003.  I received my AAS degree in Respiratory Therapy with a UGPA of 3.46.  I will graduate from SUNY-Brockport in Women and Gender Studies this December with a UGPA of 3.93.  My calculated LSAC GPA however is 2.13 and my LSAT score is 145. I work full time as a respiratory therapist,accepted to the CLEO program last summer, and have a well rounded academic and professional resume at this point.  Other than the LSAC GPA and LSAT score, I feel that I submitted a strong personal statement with addendum concerning my academic performance when first attending college, strong letters of recommendation, and had two campus visits to Cleveland-Marshall. 

I also applied to University of Akron, Case Western Reserve University, University of Toledo, Capital University, and University of Buffalo. 

Do you think I have a good chance of admission to any of the schools I applied to, especially Cleveland-Marshall(or CWRU) since I would really like to attend law school in the Cleveland area?

Thanks for your input.

terranullius

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Re: High UPGA/Low LSAC Calculated GPA/Low LSAT Score
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2007, 12:50:16 PM »
So long as these schools look beyond the LSAC gpa, you should be okay. Clearly there was an upward trend. I'm assuming you included a GPA addendum for each application, so I would think that they would consider the fact that you've done extremely well since returning to school. Good luck!
Drake Law School
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LegalMatters

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Re: High UPGA/Low LSAC Calculated GPA/Low LSAT Score
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2007, 03:15:47 PM »
Don't count on UB. I'm not saying that to be negative or discourage you, I'm saying that based on the factors UB Law uses to pick their pool.

TRad

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Re: High UPGA/Low LSAC Calculated GPA/Low LSAT Score
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2007, 08:37:20 PM »
I feel your pain.  I was in college from '86 - '90 and attended 3 universities and worked during those 4 years because I married young and his job kept transferring him.  My first two years were rocky.  My second two were great -- Dean's List every semester. Plus I finished my final 22 hours in 2 six-week summer sessions, while pregnant.  I graudated Cum Laude with a 3.58.

BUT when LSAC calculated my overall UGPA, it came in a 2.9.  I have 15 credits beyond my undergraduate degree  that were all 4.0 but count as "graduate" work.  I also have an MA done with a prestigious fellowship at a top university.... but this is merely a "soft credential."

It frustrates me! My measely 2.9 is not an accurate picture of my abilities but I'm stuck with it and most admissions officers don't seem to get past the hard numbers.  I think having an MA should be a "hard credential,"  especially for non-trad students.

Sorry for the rant...... this process can be very cruel at times.

BoRNnTHeUSA

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Re: High UPGA/Low LSAC Calculated GPA/Low LSAT Score
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2008, 01:05:00 AM »
What did you decide?  Did you attend the CLEO Program last summer?
"I believe that what self-centered men have torn down, other-centered men can build up." -- Martin Luther King Jr.