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Author Topic: A look at doc review in Washington D.C.  (Read 1052 times)

stateofbeasley

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A look at doc review in Washington D.C.
« on: November 10, 2007, 09:55:40 AM »
http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/display.php?id=34054&comments=show

Quote
Jay Kuperstein had a good job. He worked in New York for the NBA, editing basketball videos. Then he got tired of sitting in front of a video monitor for 15 hours a day and decided to go to law school.

Kuperstein, who is 30 years old, graduated from American University’s law school in 2005. The plan was to become a sports agent. “I thought it would be good with my background and law degree,” he says. “But it turns out it’s a job that’s nearly impossible to get.”

And so this new lawyer found himself sitting in front of a computer for 15 hours a day, working as a temp document reviewer, one of a growing species of big-city lawyer that sifts through electronic documents to determine whether they are relevant to pending court cases and investigations.

If you don't get into a top school or don't want to really market yourself (it takes a lot of guts and perseverance to get a job otherwise), doc review will probably be your career path. 

Save your money.  Save yourselves.  Avoid law school at all costs.

UnbiasedObserver

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Re: A look at doc review in Washington D.C.
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2007, 10:28:49 AM »
While it is good that you are making people seriously consider their career choice, law IS for some people, even if they don't get into a "prestigious" school. 

Roy Lichtenstein

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Re: A look at doc review in Washington D.C.
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2007, 10:51:17 AM »
Beasley are you a doc review atty?
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UnbiasedObserver

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Re: A look at doc review in Washington D.C.
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2007, 11:57:25 AM »
I think this is pretty funny, what do you guys really think 1st year associates at big firms do? Its doc review folks, and memo writing, and making copies and sucking up. The difference is form a top school you just get paid more to do it and wit will take longer for you to do anything other than doc review and memo writing. That’s your lot for three years or so in a big firm. Here is my advice, find out what lawyers actually do BEFORE you decide to go to law school. Only go to law school if you actually want to be, wait for it, a lawyer. If you go to law school simply to be rich odds are better than not you won’t be happy being a lawyer and you won’t end up being rich anyway. paying 100k+ to get injto a proferssion you know nothing about simply in hopes of making money is well, pretty stupid for so many otherwise smart people.

Read my response to him again, and then tell me why you think my response is funny.  I'm saying the same thing as you, in fewer words, with respect to making a smart choice.  I do not address the doc review statement, as it's true. 

(Also, for what it's worth, this guy sends this message on other law forums.  This is all I've ever seen him post.)

Roy Lichtenstein

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Re: A look at doc review in Washington D.C.
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2007, 12:07:12 PM »
To a degree he is right, although, I feel like he leaves out a lot of the other options, he only presents the two extremes (BIGLAW and contract atty).
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UnbiasedObserver

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Re: A look at doc review in Washington D.C.
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2007, 12:08:58 PM »
To a degree he is right, although, I feel like he leaves out a lot of the other options, he only presents the two extremes (BIGLAW and contract atty).

Exactly.  He is stating some truth, but the either/or fallacy gets me every time.   :)

nealric

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Re: A look at doc review in Washington D.C.
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2007, 12:20:23 PM »
Quote
if i go to a T14 school, then what are my chances at Big Law?  will i avoid this man's grim fate?

According to GULC's internal career services manual (not the published statistics), 79% of the class gets 2L summer associateships at "large firms". I think you can conclude that this is roughly the proportion of the class with access to biglaw (Perhaps a small percentage with no interest in biglaw opt out).

It is my understanding that GULC has the worst placement of the t14. So basically, as long as you are not in the bottom 20% or so, you are Ok. 

Matthies: I think the divide between a biglaw associate and a temp doc reviewer is about many things besides the actual work you do as one or the other. The work itself is not what that article really complains about. Its more the aspect of being locked in a windowless room while getting harassed by "heavyset paralegals" ( I do not pretend to know whether this is an accurate representation).
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UnbiasedObserver

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Re: A look at doc review in Washington D.C.
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2007, 12:32:14 PM »
I think this is pretty funny, what do you guys really think 1st year associates at big firms do? Its doc review folks, and memo writing, and making copies and sucking up. The difference is form a top school you just get paid more to do it and wit will take longer for you to do anything other than doc review and memo writing. That’s your lot for three years or so in a big firm. Here is my advice, find out what lawyers actually do BEFORE you decide to go to law school. Only go to law school if you actually want to be, wait for it, a lawyer. If you go to law school simply to be rich odds are better than not you won’t be happy being a lawyer and you won’t end up being rich anyway. paying 100k+ to get injto a proferssion you know nothing about simply in hopes of making money is well, pretty stupid for so many otherwise smart people.



Read my response to him again, and then tell me why you think my response is funny.   I'm saying the same thing as you, in fewer words, with respect to making a smart choice.  I do not address the doc review statement, as it's true. 

(Also, for what it's worth, this guy sends this message on other law forums.  This is all I've ever seen him post.)

Its a generalization, not response to you, if it was i would have quoted you.  ;)


Heavyset paralegals, LOL

Fair enough.

stateofbeasley

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Re: A look at doc review in Washington D.C.
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2007, 12:52:13 PM »
While it is good that you are making people seriously consider their career choice, law IS for some people, even if they don't get into a "prestigious" school.

People who are willing to market themselves heavily (generally very personable and entrepreneurial people) will be able to do well in law, regardless of school.  However, this is not most people.  I should have made this more clear in the first post :P

stateofbeasley

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Re: A look at doc review in Washington D.C.
« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2007, 12:59:57 PM »
Beasley are you a doc review atty?

Yes.  I decided I didn't want to practice.  I decided to take up document review for a year or 2 to make some money.  People not familiar with the legal profession all find it extremely impressive that I do "litigation consulting"  ;D

Some of the emails that I go through are hilarious.  While a lot of it is junk, there are always some funny email chains (internal corporate politics, office gossip, personal emails) to read.  You'd think that professionals and executive level people would be careful about what they write in their company email accounts, but they aren't.