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Author Topic: work v. study for lsat  (Read 1587 times)

big east boy

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work v. study for lsat
« on: November 07, 2007, 10:24:05 AM »
I am planning on taking the june 08 lsat and have been studying off and on for a couple of months now.  The problem is that I am working two jobs (total-40hrs per week). One I have to keep because of my bills but the other one, a paid internship at a legal aid society is an awesome job but taking away from study time.  So should I drop the internship assuming that my lsat numbers will rise with the extra study time or should I keep it with the hope that schools will admire my busy schedule?
Interested in BC, BU, UCONN, GULC

BearlyLegal

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Re: work v. study for lsat
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2007, 01:55:53 PM »
I worked 60+ hours a week and still studied 4-5 hours a day. You don't have to quit your jobs. You may have to miss out on some social activities or entertainment for a few months. Just have the discipline and you'll do stellar.

66scorer

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Re: work v. study for lsat
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2007, 02:21:06 AM »
The next paragraph totally depends on your learning style.  But my opinion is:

I would not quit, certainly not this early.  I would hope that the legal aid society would let you take extra time when it gets closer.  But..and I experienced this...you can study so much and so often, that your scores actually go down.  I was getting up 2 hours early for work every day (I was a teacher) and taking 1 or 2 sections of a practice test, then a full practice test or 2 on weekends.  I got to the point where I lost my edge.

Your brain needs time to simmer a bit with the information you are cramming into it.

Keep working, study when you can, ramp up as June gets closer.
February '05 LSAT - 157
UGPA 3.11

"Why are we violent but not illiterate?
Because we are taught to read."
Colman McCarthy

big east boy

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Re: work v. study for lsat
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2007, 08:21:22 PM »
Since it is obvious that time is limited for me and also apparently for you guys I would like to know what you have found to be the most effective means of studying for this blasted test? I have found the books from Princeton review helpful, any other suggestions?

saradsun

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Re: work v. study for lsat
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2007, 08:54:53 PM »
powerscore logic games and logical reasoning bibles, Super Prep (from LSAC)

I credit LG bible with my perfect score on Sept games and therefore my LSAT score.

good luck!

66scorer

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Re: work v. study for lsat
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2007, 08:11:07 PM »
As posted above:  Powerscore - you can find a bunch of old tests, the Games Bible, etc.

I also tried to find and read high-level articles...I chose to subscribe to "The Nation", but there are several of good mags, scientific journals, and newspapers out there.  Find something that you will enjoy reading and that challenges you.

These give you an opportunity to critically read when you can't necessarily pull out the testing materials.

Honestly, I should have picked up some of those little game books that are similar to the logic games on the test.  I think more practice on those would have helped me.

Good luck!
February '05 LSAT - 157
UGPA 3.11

"Why are we violent but not illiterate?
Because we are taught to read."
Colman McCarthy

bridget_jones

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Re: work v. study for lsat
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2007, 08:53:38 AM »
I think you should be okay since you're starting so early. This is what I did and then I really buckled down for the last couple of months before the test. I would come home from work and study 4-5 hours nearly every day. This seemed to be sufficient for me. I don't think I would've studied any more than that if I hadn't been working. The busy schedule kind of kept me from slacking because I knew that time was precious.