Law School Discussion

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« on: November 04, 2007, 07:22:11 AM »
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Re: Splitter Strategy - 151 LSAT, 3.91 GPA? Anyone else in this boat? Advice?
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2007, 08:05:13 AM »
I'm a splitter - 164 and 3.1.  I'm explain my GPA in an Addendum with explaining why I had to work 50 hours a week while going to school full time.

Re: Splitter Strategy - 151 LSAT, 3.91 GPA? Anyone else in this boat? Advice?
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2007, 08:07:34 AM »
Suffolk and New England are your only options if the Boston market is indeed where you want to end up working. Suffolk has by far the better reputation, but your LSAT is 2 points under their 25th percentile. Your GPA being way above their 75th helps, but not as much as the reverse. New England is probably a safety. I would focus all my efforts on getting into Suffolk.

By the way, a splitter is <3.0 and >170.  ;)

Re: Splitter Strategy - 151 LSAT, 3.91 GPA? Anyone else in this boat? Advice?
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2007, 08:16:18 AM »
Yes--I think you are technically what they call a "reverse splitter."  Unfortunately, it seems easier to get into better schools as a regular splitter than as a reverse, so your best option becomes doing well at a lower school and trying to transfer. 

Re: Splitter Strategy - 151 LSAT, 3.91 GPA? Anyone else in this boat? Advice?
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2007, 09:10:31 AM »
Well, Erica, even scoring a few points higher makes a huge difference at your range. A 155 is a world apart from a 151.

Re: Splitter Strategy - 151 LSAT, 3.91 GPA? Anyone else in this boat? Advice?
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2007, 09:15:21 AM »
Yes--I think you are technically what they call a "reverse splitter."  Unfortunately, it seems easier to get into better schools as a regular splitter than as a reverse, so your best option becomes doing well at a lower school and trying to transfer. 

One should never rely on transferring.

With your LSAT, you're going to have to work very hard on your application and possibly be willing to move to another region.  If I were you, I'd apply to many schools.  

To get you started, I'd look at the LSAC's calculator:

http://officialguide.lsac.org/UGPASearch/Search3.aspx

While it is not perfect, it'll give you an idea of schools which you should look at (after choosing some potential schools, check out their admissions grids by searching by geographical location on the LSAC.org website, clicking on a school's name, then clicking "Law School Description.")

Also, lawschoolnumbers.com is a great resource.

If you have any more questions, don't hesitate to ask.  I wish you the best of luck.

Re: Splitter Strategy - 151 LSAT, 3.91 GPA? Anyone else in this boat? Advice?
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2007, 09:17:16 AM »
Also, keep in mind that it is much harder to land a decent job at the schools to which you would probably be applying.  I'm just throwing that out there as a friendly warning.  Make sure to do your research before making a decision. 

Re: Splitter Strategy - 151 LSAT, 3.91 GPA? Anyone else in this boat? Advice?
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2007, 10:02:28 AM »
Also, keep in mind that it is much harder to land a decent job at the schools to which you would probably be applying.  I'm just throwing that out there as a friendly warning.  Make sure to do your research before making a decision. 

Thanks for all the info - I have researched this a lot and put a lot of thought into it.  I've looked at US N&WR, LSN, LCAS, everything.  I know I'm fighting an uphill battle here.  That's why I'm also posting here for any other insight and/or strategies that I could possibly attempt.  I think I have a really amazing PS (would you like to see it and look it over for me?), I have been working as a paralegal for 2+ years, and I am Hispanic (though my diversity statement not extremely strong, it's decent).  I finally decided it would not be worth it to study for more months, and continue scoring the same - I want to begin my life period.  And I would be happy enough going to Suffolk, which I have a decent shot at.  It has an excellent regional reputation, and I don't plan on leaving the Boston area - both my husband's and my families are here and we have a strong attachment to the area. 

I would really love to go to NU - it's where I went to undergrad and it has a public interest focus - which is what I would like to do (and my application/PS is clear on this).  It's a long shot - only 11% with my numbers get in there but I'm hoping I fall in there.  At least they will know that NU is reputable and they won't think my GPA is inflated.  I graduated the #1 political science senior, in the top 13% of over 2,200 students, and I was in the honors program.

Yes it's a shame I have such a low LSAT, I know that more than anyone but I'm just doing my best at this point.

Any extra advice or "strategy" is highly needed though!

Well, if you know for sure that you only want to practice in the Boston area, then I guess it makes your job easy where to apply!

And I'm glad to hear that you did your research. 

You are a URM, so that will help, and since you stressed the public interest focus, I'd say you have a much better shot than the odds indicate, respectively.

I'll try to take a look at your PS tonight, if you pm it to me. 

Re: Splitter Strategy - 151 LSAT, 3.91 GPA? Anyone else in this boat? Advice?
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2007, 10:26:35 AM »
I only skimmed the posts, but I had a couple questions
What is the strength of your undergrad?
What was your undergrad major?
Do you come from a challenging socio-economic background?

I'd be happy to read your diversity statement, if you'd like to PM it to me.

Tetris

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Re: Splitter Strategy - 151 LSAT, 3.91 GPA? Anyone else in this boat? Advice?
« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2007, 10:50:40 AM »
Just curious here... but are diversity statements typically 2 pages in the personal statement style?  Or are they like just 1 or 2 brief "short and sweet" paragraphs.