Law School Discussion

"cutthroat" competition

Re: "cutthroat" competition
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2004, 10:52:51 AM »
seems that within the top ten "cutthroat' competition is more a function of the class members themselves than of intangible school related factors.  given that a michigan law student could just as easily end up at, say, chicago, it may be a bit misleading to determine cutthroat competition based on school character rather than human character.  granted, there are slight patterns, and particular schools tend to attract competitive students more so than others, but i think this holds true only when comparing the top 25 or 30.  if you're looking just within top ten, my guess is you'll find cutthroat students everywhere, and the concentration in different schools can be quite random from year to year.
of course, i could be completely wrong, and i welcome someone to come on here and female dog slap my reasoning skills.

blizzard of ozz

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Re: "cutthroat" competition
« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2004, 11:31:11 AM »
Riffing on what a previous poster said about Yale, it's true their COAP program is amazing. One of my LOR writers thought that would be perfect for me, until I informed her that my LSAT score wasn't anywhere near competitive enough for there. I wish just one of the schools in my target range had a decent LRAP program, since I'm planning on gov't/public interest, but alas, such is fate.

Being able to pick a LS without the fin. aid package being an overriding concern would be quite nice. Kudos to Yale on that one.

Re: "cutthroat" competition
« Reply #12 on: March 20, 2004, 07:00:26 PM »

My main question is basically, do any of you believe that there is an inherent tradeoff between going to a school with a "cutthroat" student body and a school with low national prestige and ranking?
]

I think you're making an enormous generalization here. Any law school you attend, regardless of ranking, prestige, etc. is going to be competitive and perhaps, yes, cutthroat. The main reason?  Take a look at some of the want ads for attorneys.  Most look for an individaul graduating in the top 10-20% of their class with sometimes substantial extra-curricular activities, regardless of the school that they graduate from.  Moot court is competitive. Getting onto law review is competitive.  Most students compete to 'book' (award) classes.  And for a number of schools, grades are determined by performance.  Only a certain percentage of students will receive A's regardless of how well all of the students do. It's not like undergrad where 90-100 is an A, 80-90 is a B, etc.  You are working basically against other students for your grade.

At least that has been the experience of the husband that I just put through law school...

Karen W.

Re: "cutthroat" competition
« Reply #13 on: March 20, 2004, 08:10:15 PM »

My main question is basically, do any of you believe that there is an inherent tradeoff between going to a school with a "cutthroat" student body and a school with low national prestige and ranking?
]

I think you're making an enormous generalization here. Any law school you attend, regardless of ranking, prestige, etc. is going to be competitive and perhaps, yes, cutthroat. The main reason?  Take a look at some of the want ads for attorneys.  Most look for an individaul graduating in the top 10-20% of their class with sometimes substantial extra-curricular activities, regardless of the school that they graduate from.  Moot court is competitive. Getting onto law review is competitive.  Most students compete to 'book' (award) classes.  And for a number of schools, grades are determined by performance.  Only a certain percentage of students will receive A's regardless of how well all of the students do. It's not like undergrad where 90-100 is an A, 80-90 is a B, etc.  You are working basically against other students for your grade.

At least that has been the experience of the husband that I just put through law school...

Karen W.

90-100 is an A, 80-90 is a B?  Whoa, did I miss something in undergrad? o.O  My Bs were more like 50-60s... ;)  Actually, law school sounds a lot like college then -- gotta love those curves.

Re: "cutthroat" competition
« Reply #14 on: March 21, 2004, 09:09:28 AM »
well, if you go to the findlaw.com 's rankings, well they are not actually ranking, but they call it like that, then you will see that people are really miserable in yale. I would say that harvard is the best, althought it is competitive, but, afterall, you dont go to law school to hang out everyday and then expect to get a great job. yes, you can go to harvard and not 'compete', but then , dont complain for not having the best job in the most prestigous firm as your classmates did.

visit my cool website @ www.2lawschool.blog-city.com

Re: "cutthroat" competition
« Reply #15 on: March 21, 2004, 08:41:45 PM »

90-100 is an A, 80-90 is a B?  Whoa, did I miss something in undergrad? o.O  My Bs were more like 50-60s... ;)  Actually, law school sounds a lot like college then -- gotta love those curves.

You make an interesting point and I hope you didn't misinterpret mine.  Your comment definitely demonstrates the inherent differences between undergrad schools.

I didn't mean to say that law schools curve grades in the traditional manner that we're all accustomed to.  A professor may, given the number of students in the class, designate for 'test A', only 5 students will get A's, and then grade the papers. What happens then is a substantial number of the students end up with B's and C's.  They don't use a curve to set the grade, rather they use a curve to determine the grade.

Karen W.

jgruber

Re: "cutthroat" competition
« Reply #16 on: March 22, 2004, 09:12:52 AM »
I would think that you'd want to select a school that is as competitive as you want your law career to be.

If you want the cutthroat high-stakes fast-moving career, go to the cutthroat school.  If not, look at other schools.

In other words, use your law school to train you for the career you want.