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Author Topic: Judging schools based on admissions speed?  (Read 263 times)

OnTheRoad

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Judging schools based on admissions speed?
« on: October 20, 2007, 01:04:40 AM »
Anyone else out there find themselves subtly judging schools based on how efficiently their admissions offices seem to operate? With duke turning around decisions in seven days, and with most of my september 1st apps complete, I find myself wondering why it's taken a few schools two months to process my paper, and if that's the sort of thing I could expect from the school in general. I know it's the sort of stupid thing one worries about while awaiting decisions, but this is also my first and only exposure to a given school's bureaucracy, and if it takes them two months to process the most important paper in my life, I have to think that reflects to some extent on the overall efficiency of a school about that sort of thing.

I say this by way of warning schools that if they take much longer to finish my apps, I'm going to reject them first.

ManTGeo

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Re: Judging schools based on admissions speed?
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2007, 02:12:45 PM »
This is exactly why Duke has priority track. It's clever marketing.

ErnieJ

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Re: Judging schools based on admissions speed?
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2007, 03:47:59 PM »
This is exactly why Duke has priority track. It's clever marketing.

Indeed, it's pretty brilliant marketing on Duke's part.  People are naturally very excited to receive their first acceptance, and by hearing from Duke first, we get threads here such as, "OMFG IN AT DUKE!!!!!!!!"

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/prelaw/index.php?topic=93496.0 

Having that defined seven day turnaround creates a lot of anticipation, and even people with 3.9+/175+ seemed anxious about hearing from Duke. Then, when they post their celebratory responses upon being accepted, people see that and think, "Huh, Duke must be a really good school for such great applicants to get so worked up about it.  I'm going to apply there too."   

And by picking a relatively small group of applicants for the priority track who are likely to get accepted anyway, it allows them to not only respond very quickly but also ensure that all the reaction is positive, so that we don't get threads like, "OMFG REJECTED BY DUKE!!!!!!!!"