Law School Discussion

How Ruskie got into Boalt with a sub-160 and what she's learned from it

BearlyLegal

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Re: How Ruskie got into Boalt with a sub-160 and what she's learned from it
« Reply #70 on: October 24, 2007, 01:16:57 PM »
BTW, for someone who's against personal attacks, you sure use them a lot.  Why is it ok for you to use homophobic slurs
My "homophobic" slur was clearly not meant as a personal attack against any individual. Further, it was not meant to denigrate the homosexual community. It was an off-the-cuff remark made when I was exceptionally tired, and I have apologized for it profusely, and do so once again: I apologize for using the word "queer" in a negative context.

That being said, you DO have a legitimate right to attack me for saying this. I am equally hard on myself for saying such an awful and inappropriate thing.

Quote
and insist that everyone else is jealous and didn't get into Boalt, but it's not ok for us to legitimately criticize ruskie (and your arguments)?
It's perfectly ok for you, and everyone to engage in this discussion; but it's equally ok for me to defend myself and a poster who has helped me. Wouldn't you say?

Re Your Edit: Admittedly, I have no evidence of precisely how successful she was. All I know is that she has a great job post-graduation, and that the worst students at Boalt often find it hard to score biglaw gigs. Based on that, I make the assumption that at the very least, she had mediocre grades, but still outranked at least *some* of her peers.

Still, if we used the LSAT as the predictor of her law school performance, she should be something like 3-4 standard deviations less qualified for Boalt than it's median students (I did quick math here, please don't hold it against me). Surely, such a huge discrepancy would have put her at an insurmountable competitive disadvantage against her peers if her LSAT score was truly indicative of her aptitude.

Re Your Edit (Continued): ...OR the LSAT truly is not an accurate objective predictor of law school aptitude, and Boalt's adcomms are right when they choose to be more lenient with LSAT grades than many of their peer schools.

There are many ways to look at the LSAT's legitimacy, and you and I are not the first, most qualified, or most intelligent people to disagree on this contentious subject.

Re: How Ruskie got into Boalt with a sub-160 and what she's learned from it
« Reply #71 on: October 24, 2007, 01:30:22 PM »
Still, if we used the LSAT as the predictor of her law school performance, she should be something like 3-4 standard deviations less qualified for Boalt than it's median students (I did quick math here, please don't hold it against me). Surely, such a huge discrepancy would have put her at an insurmountable competitive disadvantage against her peers if her LSAT score was truly indicative of her aptitude.

Um, no. Boalt students are not smart. The LSAT is a good indicator of verbal intelligence. It's not perfect, but it's pretty good. Sub 160 is atrocious.


LittleRussianPrincess, Esq.

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Re: How Ruskie got into Boalt with a sub-160 and what she's learned from it
« Reply #72 on: October 24, 2007, 03:18:05 PM »
In an effort to get back on topic...

I think that I got special consideration because I am an immigrant, but I also feel that what set me apart is that I didn't turn my personal statement into a sob story about how awful life was in Russia. There are so many immigrants applying to law school these days and ad coms are probably tired of hearing  the same old story from thousands of different people. Living in a developing country is hard, but it's not novel, so I think that those of you who are immigrants should try to tease out some aspect of your immigrant experience that is unique to you and focus on that rather than on the differences of life in the US vs your homeland.

I think that sob stories in general a bad idea, whether they relate to an immigrant experience or not. For what it's worth, the non-immigrants I know who got into Boalt with sub 160's didn't write sob story PS's.


BearlyLegal

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Re: How Ruskie got into Boalt with a sub-160 and what she's learned from it
« Reply #73 on: October 24, 2007, 03:21:52 PM »
In an effort to get back on topic...

I think that I got special consideration because I am an immigrant, but I also feel that what set me apart is that I didn't turn my personal statement into a sob story about how awful life was in Russia. There are so many immigrants applying to law school these days and ad coms are probably tired of hearing  the same old story from thousands of different people. Living in a developing country is hard, but it's not novel, so I think that those of you who are immigrants should try to tease out some aspect of your immigrant experience that is unique to you and focus on that rather than on the differences of life in the US vs your homeland.

I think that sob stories in general a bad idea, whether they relate to an immigrant experience or not. For what it's worth, the non-immigrants I know who got into Boalt with sub 160's didn't write sob story PS's.



Yup. I gave cursory mention of my immigration early in my PS, but halfway through the first page, mentioned how the typical immigrant experience was not the defining factor of my life.

Still, I wanna see your PS! Send it over!

LittleRussianPrincess, Esq.

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Re: How Ruskie got into Boalt with a sub-160 and what she's learned from it
« Reply #74 on: October 24, 2007, 03:23:57 PM »
In an effort to get back on topic...

I think that I got special consideration because I am an immigrant, but I also feel that what set me apart is that I didn't turn my personal statement into a sob story about how awful life was in Russia. There are so many immigrants applying to law school these days and ad coms are probably tired of hearing  the same old story from thousands of different people. Living in a developing country is hard, but it's not novel, so I think that those of you who are immigrants should try to tease out some aspect of your immigrant experience that is unique to you and focus on that rather than on the differences of life in the US vs your homeland.

I think that sob stories in general a bad idea, whether they relate to an immigrant experience or not. For what it's worth, the non-immigrants I know who got into Boalt with sub 160's didn't write sob story PS's.



Yup. I gave cursory mention of my immigration early in my PS, but halfway through the first page, mentioned how the typical immigrant experience was not the defining factor of my life.

Still, I wanna see your PS! Send it over!

when i get home i'll send it.

BearlyLegal

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Re: How Ruskie got into Boalt with a sub-160 and what she's learned from it
« Reply #75 on: October 24, 2007, 03:35:19 PM »
In an effort to get back on topic...

I think that I got special consideration because I am an immigrant, but I also feel that what set me apart is that I didn't turn my personal statement into a sob story about how awful life was in Russia. There are so many immigrants applying to law school these days and ad coms are probably tired of hearing  the same old story from thousands of different people. Living in a developing country is hard, but it's not novel, so I think that those of you who are immigrants should try to tease out some aspect of your immigrant experience that is unique to you and focus on that rather than on the differences of life in the US vs your homeland.

I think that sob stories in general a bad idea, whether they relate to an immigrant experience or not. For what it's worth, the non-immigrants I know who got into Boalt with sub 160's didn't write sob story PS's.



Yup. I gave cursory mention of my immigration early in my PS, but halfway through the first page, mentioned how the typical immigrant experience was not the defining factor of my life.

Still, I wanna see your PS! Send it over!

when i get home i'll send it.
:-*

Freak

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Re: How Ruskie got into Boalt with a sub-160 and what she's learned from it
« Reply #76 on: October 24, 2007, 03:36:03 PM »
In an effort to get back on topic...

I think that I got special consideration because I am an immigrant, but I also feel that what set me apart is that I didn't turn my personal statement into a sob story about how awful life was in Russia. There are so many immigrants applying to law school these days and ad coms are probably tired of hearing  the same old story from thousands of different people. Living in a developing country is hard, but it's not novel, so I think that those of you who are immigrants should try to tease out some aspect of your immigrant experience that is unique to you and focus on that rather than on the differences of life in the US vs your homeland.

I think that sob stories in general a bad idea, whether they relate to an immigrant experience or not. For what it's worth, the non-immigrants I know who got into Boalt with sub 160's didn't write sob story PS's.



Not to stray too far, but is it true that most Russians have no washer or dryer? My roommate married one and he told me that.

BearlyLegal

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Re: How Ruskie got into Boalt with a sub-160 and what she's learned from it
« Reply #77 on: October 24, 2007, 03:50:40 PM »
In an effort to get back on topic...

I think that I got special consideration because I am an immigrant, but I also feel that what set me apart is that I didn't turn my personal statement into a sob story about how awful life was in Russia. There are so many immigrants applying to law school these days and ad coms are probably tired of hearing  the same old story from thousands of different people. Living in a developing country is hard, but it's not novel, so I think that those of you who are immigrants should try to tease out some aspect of your immigrant experience that is unique to you and focus on that rather than on the differences of life in the US vs your homeland.

I think that sob stories in general a bad idea, whether they relate to an immigrant experience or not. For what it's worth, the non-immigrants I know who got into Boalt with sub 160's didn't write sob story PS's.



Not to stray too far, but is it true that most Russians have no washer or dryer? My roommate married one and he told me that.

In Russia or in the US? In the former USSR, this would be a huge luxury.

In any urban area of the US, this is a pretty huge luxury too, though.

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Re: How Ruskie got into Boalt with a sub-160 and what she's learned from it
« Reply #78 on: October 24, 2007, 03:53:38 PM »
But in the US there are laundry mats nearby. According to him, the Russians washed clothes in bathtubs.

BearlyLegal

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Re: How Ruskie got into Boalt with a sub-160 and what she's learned from it
« Reply #79 on: October 24, 2007, 03:59:30 PM »
I left in 1990, and my mom used to handwash my stuff.

I can't vouch for today, but my understanding from family that still lives there is that there is no real middle class in the former USSR. Just noveu riche oligarchs who own everything, and probably would pimp out their benzes with washers and driers if they could, and everyone else, who are incredibly poor and have trouble getting nutritious food and winter heating, not to speak of luxury appliances.

Then again, my remaining family there live in a tiny village that lacks indoor plumbing, so their experience is not necessarily representative of what life in a major city would be like.