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Author Topic: Referencing current case law to make my point...  (Read 380 times)

contrarian

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Referencing current case law to make my point...
« on: October 10, 2007, 07:43:35 AM »
...I'm a non-traditional coming from an IT background.  I'd like to argue for the utility of someone with my skill set in the legal community by pointing out recent cases that were lost due to poor technical knowledge of the attorney/team.  That to properly represent individuals in these cases requires both skill in the law and the technology behind it, and as we become increasingly a digital society this will become increasingly in demand.

Is this a wise approach?

Oh.. and that I hope to milk mega-national corporations as I sift through each and every e-mail sent in the past 5 years to ascertain their applicability to a case while in the discovery phase for untold number of hours at $300 per.

 

I am Penny Lane

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Re: Referencing current case law to make my point...
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2007, 09:32:11 AM »
Agreed.
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gclemen1

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Re: Referencing current case law to make my point...
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2007, 09:49:49 AM »
i believe the PS is more catered towards telling the admissions committee a little bit more about your personal side, not an essay arguing stuff like a paper in college.

Leo

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Re: Referencing current case law to make my point...
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2007, 11:58:39 AM »
i believe the PS is more catered towards telling the admissions committee a little bit more about your personal side

That's exactly what it's supposed to do.

Your IT background will be apparent elsewhere in your application. Let them assess the utility of it on their own. Your personal statement should be a conversational piece of writing that helps them get to know you, not a summary of your résumé or a legal argument.