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Author Topic: Certifying Statement - Whats with the cursive?  (Read 973 times)

contrarian

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Certifying Statement - Whats with the cursive?
« on: October 09, 2007, 06:45:45 PM »
What is up with the certifying statement, and why must it be in cursive rather than printed?

I easily have not used cursive for anything more than my sloppy signature for well over 20 years.  On the day of the test, I wasn't even able get through the word 'certify' and I just decided to print it.  I received a letter that they insist on my handwriting the declaration. 

Cursive writing is dead.  Period.  This is a bull requirement. 

kormybear

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Re: Certifying Statement - Whats with the cursive?
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2007, 07:05:07 PM »
Wow i can't beelive you received a letter for that!  My proctor said we could either write in cursive or just use our normal handwriting.  I'm now very glad i ignored her and just wrote it in cursive.  I agree it is stupid.  they don't even teach it at some elementary schools anymore. 

just dot

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Re: Certifying Statement - Whats with the cursive?
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2007, 07:38:15 PM »
What is up with the certifying statement, and why must it be in cursive rather than printed?

I easily have not used cursive for anything more than my sloppy signature for well over 20 years.  On the day of the test, I wasn't even able get through the word 'certify' and I just decided to print it.  I received a letter that they insist on my handwriting the declaration. 

Cursive writing is dead.  Period.  This is a bull requirement. 

I never really thought about it but now that you meantion it...yeah, what's up with that?  Why does it matter exactly how it is written as long as it is your handwriting?  I write in very sloppy cursive most of the time (it's more of a mix of cursive and print, actually) so it was no big deal for me but there were some grumbles in our room, for sure.
To put it bluntly, I seem to have a whole superstructure with no foundation. But I`m working on the foundation.

laughing hard

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Re: Certifying Statement - Whats with the cursive?
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2007, 08:01:43 PM »
I think it might be that cursive writing is easier to match to signatures, if it becomes necessary--keeping people from switching at the break or something.
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TerpSkins23

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Re: Certifying Statement - Whats with the cursive?
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2007, 08:21:44 PM »
Yea it took me forever to scribble it out in cursive.  It was borderline legible.  I haven't written in cursive in forever. It was like writing in a foreign language.  I feel a decent bit behind bubbling in the rest of the stuff.

BlueGreen

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Re: Certifying Statement - Whats with the cursive?
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2007, 03:04:29 AM »
I think it might be that cursive writing is easier to match to signatures, if it becomes necessary--keeping people from switching at the break or something.

that's what i thought, but how would it work for people who don't normally write in cursive and have to fake it on test day? i never write in cursive normally and i have to connect the letters together on these tests so it sort of looks like cursive. i doubt that my "cursive" looks like the same handwriting twice.
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contrarian

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Re: Certifying Statement - Whats with the cursive?
« Reply #6 on: October 10, 2007, 06:54:29 AM »
I would have to guess that it is for 'security', which would assume cursive is more reliable for ascertaining the authenticity of the author.  Personally I'd think printing would work just as well, there's got to be enough various idiosyncrasies that you could use to confirm authorship.  I also think a good artist would be able to train them self in someones handwriting and be able to forge the certifying statement, so this is hardly a reliable practice to begin with.  Hell even the thumb print can be forged (a web search will bring up an article of how to make a fake finger print you can make that you can put on your finger).

Anyhow, I managed to suffer through writing it out.  It took me a while since I did each word quite slowly and meticulously as I had to consciously think how to write out each word. 

I'm probably going to include a letter stating my objection to the practice.  As an older student who hasn't been forced to use cursive in over 20 years, this seems to be discriminatory and that they should have indicated a need for cursive writing prior to my taking the test so that I could have practiced it.  The results added an additional level of stress throughout the taking of the exam as I worried that I had printed the certifying statement, and all of my work would end up for naught.  Even if this caused me a slight distraction causing me to get a few questions incorrect, that could have a huge impact on my score and what school I get in, and my earning potential for the rest of my life.  In fact, I think I have a multi-million dollar lawsuit.

Noooo

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Re: Certifying Statement - Whats with the cursive?
« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2007, 08:30:44 AM »
I also think a good artist would be able to train them self in someones handwriting and be able to forge the certifying statement, so this is hardly a reliable practice to begin with. 

I'm probably going to include a letter stating my objection to the practice.  As an older student who hasn't been forced to use cursive in over 20 years, this seems to be discriminatory and that they should have indicated a need for cursive writing prior to my taking the test so that I could have practiced it.  The results added an additional level of stress throughout the taking of the exam as I worried that I had printed the certifying statement, and all of my work would end up for naught.  Even if this caused me a slight distraction causing me to get a few questions incorrect, that could have a huge impact on my score and what school I get in, and my earning potential for the rest of my life.  In fact, I think I have a multi-million dollar lawsuit.

How much would you have to pay a person who can get you a 180 AND be "artistic" enough to pull this off.

Are you sure LSAC didn't mention the cursive thing in the paperwork or their website?  I think they do. 

It's not like they make you write your essay in cursive.  That would be a wicked trick.  It's just for a statement that's not scored and not even read by anyone.  I'm not trying to cross the line into jerkhood by saying this, but how could you worry about this to the point of "distraction causing [you] to get a few questions incorrect, that could have a huge impact on [your] score and what school I get in, and [your] earning potential for the rest of [your] life.  If you really were worried though, I will suggest that no matter what you not write about this being a concern or problem for you in any of your law school applications (like the essay explaining a low LSAT score or something).   

saradsun

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Re: Certifying Statement - Whats with the cursive?
« Reply #8 on: October 10, 2007, 11:46:45 AM »
It was my understanding that he got a letter instructing him to now write out the certifying statement in cursive, since he printed it at the LSAT center.

I don't see anything unusual in him getting a letter. I and another on the board have received letters due to irregularity warnings letting us know that after their investigation, the matter was closed. (I was too embarrassed to say anything after the test, but I received an irregularity/misconduct warning for opening my esaay topic too early because I thought I heard the proctor say begin.) Needless to say, I'm quite relieved.

contrarian

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Re: Certifying Statement - Whats with the cursive?
« Reply #9 on: October 10, 2007, 02:39:38 PM »

How much would you have to pay a person who can get you a 180 AND be "artistic" enough to pull this off.

Are you sure LSAC didn't mention the cursive thing in the paperwork or their website?  I think they do. 

It's not like they make you write your essay in cursive.  That would be a wicked trick.  It's just for a statement that's not scored and not even read by anyone.  I'm not trying to cross the line into jerkhood by saying this, but how could you worry about this to the point of "distraction causing [you] to get a few questions incorrect, that could have a huge impact on [your] score and what school I get in, and [your] earning potential for the rest of [your] life.  If you really were worried though, I will suggest that no matter what you not write about this being a concern or problem for you in any of your law school applications (like the essay explaining a low LSAT score or something).   

Someone able to replicate my handwriting for the certifying statement doesn't also have to get a 180... they just need to be able to get a higher score than I'm currently willing or able to get.  Cost, for some, may be immaterial.  While your correct that generally speaking this would be reliable and finding a person able to stand in for you and pay them enough may be difficult, it's not outside the realm of possibility, especially for someone with money and connections. 

I didn't see anything stating I HAD to write the certifying statement until the day of the test.  Though, I can't say I read every single bit of documentation available (a web search brought up some older posts on the Internet for instance). 

Why would I worry about this as I took the test? Because it may have cause my entire test to become invalidated, a concern that was unduly put upon me due to not fully disclosing this relevant requirement.  Even a minor distraction like this may take me away from complete concentration on the test, and therefore I'm now at a disadvantage to anyone else who didn't have such a distraction.  You may find it an insignificant concern, I may find it very significant concern.  It is a subjective experience that would vary from person to person.