Law School Discussion

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« on: October 03, 2007, 07:11:04 PM »
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Re: I'm Troubled by the Ivey PS Guide
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2007, 07:20:53 PM »
I would always take her advice w/ a grain of salt.
I too hated her favorite (the one w/ the bookreader).
She has some good tips, like her resumes section, but overall listen to your instinct.
She wasn't an adcomm for that long.

Cabra

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Re: I'm Troubled by the Ivey PS Guide
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2007, 07:36:10 PM »
Who told you narrative is a no no?

I'm not a huge fan of the essays in ivey's book either, but I don't think they're terrible either.

I'm sure adcoms are tired of reading extremely naive or disingenuous reasons about why people want to go to law school. Most straight out of undergrad students are not going to have compelling stories about why they want to practice law.

I think the main idea of a ps is to get an idea of who you are and how you think.

Cabra

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Re: I'm Troubled by the Ivey PS Guide
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2007, 07:52:45 PM »
Who told you narrative is a no no?

A woman that teaches "Personal Statement" weekend courses told me that turning the entire statement into a narrative is a no-no.  If you have two related anecdotes and some soul-searching, then it's fine, but adcomms don't want to read your attempt at Chekhov or Nabokov.

And the second PS in Ivey's book is not the former's "Ward No. 6."

HAHA! You might be right about a whole statement as narrative. I don't think most people have the writing skills to pull it off. Still, the narrative/reflection/narrative or some other hybrid is good.

Re: I'm Troubled by the Ivey PS Guide
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2007, 08:02:57 PM »
Who told you narrative is a no no?

A woman that teaches "Personal Statement" weekend courses told me that turning the entire statement into a narrative is a no-no.  If you have two related anecdotes and some soul-searching, then it's fine, but adcomms don't want to read your attempt at Chekhov or Nabokov.

Eh. I guess there are varying opinions on this, but I'm pretty sure that a completely narrative PS is okay, especially with an open-ended prompt. My PS had absolutely nothing to do with why I want to go to law school, or what makes me prepared for law school, and just said something about who I am. I really do think it's just supposed to be a writing sample that showcases personal qualities, unless the prompt specifies otherwise. Seriously, I think just read the prompt carefully, and avoid being pretentious or trite.

I too think a narrative PS is fine, provided you can pull it off. A "why I want to go to law school" or "why I'm super-qualified for law school" PS sounds like it would be awful to read.

Then again, I'm not on an adcomm.

Re: I'm Troubled by the Ivey PS Guide
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2007, 08:28:49 PM »
If you read Montauk's book you'll realize that adcomms at the top schools differ greatly in what the want from your personal statement. 

papercranes

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Re: I'm Troubled by the Ivey PS Guide
« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2007, 09:02:47 AM »
If you read Montauk's book you'll realize that adcomms at the top schools differ greatly in what the want from your personal statement. 

What are some of Montauk's tips? I think I've actually gotten my PS off the ground. It's narrative-y, but I think based on my background, I think the approach is appropriate (I hope). I really don't want to write a "why law" essay. Instead, mine shows how I am prepared to handle family law (which is what I want to go into).

ghil04

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Re: I'm Troubled by the Ivey PS Guide
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2007, 10:21:21 AM »
I would highly recommend that all of you pore through this thread: http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/prelaw/index.php/topic,50468.0.html.  It'll give you a general idea as to what PS topics will make you stand out and which ones won't.

Regarding the Ivey book, I think her sample essays were pretty bad, but her general advice about distinguishing between an SOP and a PS is important.  In general, the further you go below the t14, the more important it is for you to address the 'why law' question.  Within the t14, I would say that failing to mention the law altogether will probably have no direct impact upon your application, and will allow you to craft a piece that more accurately represents you as a person (I mean, how many fantastic narratives and personal reflections end with someone talking about 'why law school is right for them' or some other BS). 

Really, it's all about where you plan on going.

t...

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Re: I'm Troubled by the Ivey PS Guide
« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2007, 10:32:21 AM »
Do a search in the general board for Personal Statements. Last year's applicants shared their personal statements, and so many of them were really f-ing good. Very few (if any) had anything to do with law, but were narratives about dancing and vaginas and rock concerts and other bits of hilarity/tragedy/introspection.

Unfortunately most have been since deleted out, but I think some still remain.