Law School Discussion

Study Guide

Study Guide
« on: September 21, 2007, 11:51:16 AM »
So I have decided to take the Dec. LSAT. Any advise on what kind of study plan/guide I should use will be greatly appreciated.

I score 150 on my diagnostic. I already bought LG and LR and started reading both. What can I use to improve my RC? How many preptest should I take before the exam the real thing? I have 2 months to study - NO WORK! just study for the LSAT.

This is my plan ---

5 Hrs per day + Take 4 exams per week + review exams + revist LG and LR bibles + I don't know what to do for RC (I struggle in RC, main problem is running out of time) + Relax.

Is this good enough? Too much?

Re: Study Guide
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2007, 12:05:33 PM »
So I have decided to take the Dec. LSAT. Any advise on what kind of study plan/guide I should use will be greatly appreciated.

I score 150 on my diagnostic. I already bought LG and LR and started reading both. What can I use to improve my RC? How many preptest should I take before the exam the real thing? I have 2 months to study - NO WORK! just study for the LSAT.

This is my plan ---

5 Hrs per day + Take 4 exams per week + review exams + revist LG and LR bibles + I don't know what to do for RC (I struggle in RC, main problem is running out of time) + Relax.

Is this good enough? Too much?


Bad study guide. Do not waste time with going to the bibles. They are good to study to know the basics. But do not give enough pratice to study with them. I typed notes from the logical reasoning bible. ( 500 pages) and i   cut it down to 10 pages typed. I was amazed. I studied this thing for months  and i could of studied it in a day. Same with the games bible.


The 4 test per week is too much. No point in taking the older test in full. The games are different. And  the skills you use will change over time.


Do pratice sections timed each day. for a month. Then take about 10 full length test in full. ( Prep test 42-52)

Re: Study Guide
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2007, 02:58:45 PM »
Bad study guide.
and inane comments that make little sense...

Bseven, whatever you do, do not listen to this guy, not only can he barely write English, his knowledge is extremely limited.  Just do a quick search and read his posts.

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Re: Study Guide
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2007, 03:47:23 PM »
I found his advice to avoid methods and "get good sleep. Read the passage.  And answer the questions the best you can." to be extremely helpful. Prior to that post I was staying up all night and then just sitting there NOT answering the questions. Can we sticky that gem, do ya think?

Re: Study Guide
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2007, 04:41:57 PM »
I found his advice to avoid methods and "get good sleep. Read the passage.  And answer the questions the best you can." to be extremely helpful. Prior to that post I was staying up all night and then just sitting there NOT answering the questions. Can we sticky that gem, do ya think?

What a relief, for I thought I was the only one who had forgotten to "read the passages."  I was just too ashamed to admit it.

Re: Study Guide
« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2007, 05:29:35 PM »


I score 150 on my diagnostic. I already bought LG and LR and started reading both. What can I use to improve my RC?

I've used the reading comp techniques out of Nova, Princeton review and Testmasters, but none have led me to a strategy of attacking the reading comp more efficiently than the Spark notes reading comp technique.

http://www.sparknotes.com/testprep/books/lsat/index.html

Check it out. I actually incorporated some of the Nova techniques with the Spark notes techniques and have seen a vast improvement in my reading comp.

As for a study guide, I suggest the method implemented on this website: http://getlawschooled.blogspot.com/2007/05/getting-started.html

I've used this study technique, and so far so good. I am also planning to take the December 1st LSAT. I also suggest not taking a practice test everyday. 3 is probably a better number to tackle in a weeks time. For example: you can take a PT on monday, review it and work on specific question types you have problems with on Tuesday and so on.

You just alternate this method 3 times a week, and take a day off (This is my  personal study method). I feel a day off during the week to do whatever I want, allows a lot of information i've studied to sink in.

Good luck!

Re: Study Guide
« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2007, 07:03:42 PM »
I've used the reading comp techniques out of Nova, Princeton review and Testmasters, but none have led me to a strategy of attacking the reading comp more efficiently than the Spark notes reading comp technique.

I'm just going through the "Essential Element" for each paragraph, and while it looks promising, it is a lot to do in 3-4 minutes.  Are you able to do all 4 within the time frame, or are you "building up" speed.  Could you elaborate?  You're the first I've encountered using their method.

Re: Study Guide
« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2007, 08:52:22 PM »
I've used the reading comp techniques out of Nova, Princeton review and Testmasters, but none have led me to a strategy of attacking the reading comp more efficiently than the Spark notes reading comp technique.

I'm just going through the "Essential Element" for each paragraph, and while it looks promising, it is a lot to do in 3-4 minutes.  Are you able to do all 4 within the time frame, or are you "building up" speed.  Could you elaborate?  You're the first I've encountered using their method.

The essential elements are things you should be mindful when scanning the passage for the "big picture" type questions. The trick is to keep them in mind, which means just recognize them (doesn't mean you have to write or jot everything down). Now, that does seem to be quite a lot of information to keep in mind, but it all becomes second nature once you implement that type of method countless times. It is almost like recognizing "red flags" in the passage where questions can be derived. As time goes by, you should be able to see the patterns the author uses in the passages to ask certain types of questions.

Also, scanning the questions before reading the passage should not be too much of an effort (Maximum 1 minute). Recognize how many "big picture" questions and "content questions" are being asked; that will guide you to how to attack the passage (Either reading for structure, content or something more elaborate). This effort will save you time in the long run because you can assess which passages will be time consuming and which will not (Just like the strategy in the games section: Easiest-->hardest)

Putting the time to extract the essential elements is analogous to extracting inferences in the games section. We have all seen how productive our question answering speed/ efficiency becomes when we correctly do this. To perfect this type of method seems to be a proper, methodical way of attacking this section.

In my personal opinion, this type of attack has worked out for me more than the other methods I mentioned. Remember, everyone has different opinions and what works for one, may not work for others.