Law School Discussion

Are some law schools "easier" than others?

cui bono?

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #50 on: September 25, 2007, 12:47:54 PM »
http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2007/09/24/the-dark-side-of-legal-job-market/

worth a read...


yeah i agree with those students, no one really 'splains this side of the profession

cui bono?

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #51 on: September 25, 2007, 01:23:18 PM »
http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2007/09/24/the-dark-side-of-legal-job-market/

worth a read...


yeah i agree with those students, no one really 'splains this side of the profession

 ???

Loyola 2L?

nope.  There really is  a "dark side" that no one knows about until it's too late.

Miss P

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #52 on: September 26, 2007, 07:20:19 PM »
Just because more first generation millionaires come from NYU than from Princeton or Harvard doesn't mean you are more likely to become a first generation millionaire coming from NYU...

At least someone said it.

Miss P

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #53 on: September 26, 2007, 07:42:02 PM »
Do I count as a first generation millionaire if my parents were millionaires but didn't give me any inheritance money?

I don't think so, and I'm pretty sure this is part of it. 

Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #54 on: September 26, 2007, 10:13:44 PM »
We don't need to know his name.  I would be grateful if he simply graced us with his anonymous presence. 

Miss P

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #55 on: September 27, 2007, 08:58:18 AM »
We considered the competitiveness and the (in)ability of students, but we never really considered that some schools just have higher expectations than others.  At school A, professors might expect you to study 9 to 5, and at school B, professors might expect 8 to 8.  I would guess that there is a positive correlation between a school's USNews ranking and their difficulty.  I think it's worth discussion, though.

What makes you think this kind of expectation would be higher at a higher-ranked school?  Liberal arts colleges tend to see the reverse, for whatever that's worth.

Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #56 on: September 27, 2007, 09:32:20 AM »
In short, no law school is particularly hard.  It's just voluminous.

This seems to be relatively well-accepted here.

Why, then, is the LSAT such a strong predictor of law school success?  If this were true, it would seem that GPA would be a much stronger indicator of success (at least if you consider the UG institution as well).

Miss P

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #57 on: September 27, 2007, 09:41:47 AM »
In short, no law school is particularly hard.  It's just voluminous.

This seems to be relatively well-accepted here.

Why, then, is the LSAT such a strong predictor of law school success?  If this were true, it would seem that GPA would be a much stronger indicator of success (at least if you consider the UG institution as well).

I agree with this, share your question, and understand your reasoning above.

Anecdotally, however, as a student at a lower-ranked school, I find that I do have a tremendous amount of work (when I choose to do it), and, having spoken to friends at higher-ranked schools about their curricula, I often get the impression that my curriculum is at least as if not more rigorous than theirs (beyond the grading policies).  For instance, I read close to 100 pages of constitutional law per week in my first semester of conlaw, which was two credits.  And at my school (and other lower-ranked schools), we have graded legal writing plus four or five substantive-law classes first year, while most higher-ranked schools have ungraded legal writing plus three substantive-law classes.  (The number of credits may be similar or the same, but in terms of exam preparation, at least, the number of classes makes a difference.)

H4CS

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #58 on: September 27, 2007, 10:08:17 AM »
Why, then, is the LSAT such a strong predictor of law school success?  If this were true, it would seem that GPA would be a much stronger indicator of success (at least if you consider the UG institution as well).

1,  The LSAT is a very bad predictor of law school success.
2.  UG GPA, when properly weighted, may be a better predictor.  There's no non-circular way to find this out.
3.  The LSAT isn't hard, either.

cui bono?

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #59 on: September 27, 2007, 10:43:15 AM »
In short, no law school is particularly hard.  It's just voluminous.

This seems to be relatively well-accepted here.

Why, then, is the LSAT such a strong predictor of law school success?  If this were true, it would seem that GPA would be a much stronger indicator of success (at least if you consider the UG institution as well).

I agree with this, share your question, and understand your reasoning above.

Anecdotally, however, as a student at a lower-ranked school, I find that I do have a tremendous amount of work (when I choose to do it), and, having spoken to friends at higher-ranked schools about their curricula, I often get the impression that my curriculum is at least as if not more rigorous than theirs (beyond the grading policies).  For instance, I read close to 100 pages of constitutional law per week in my first semester of conlaw, which was two credits.  And at my school (and other lower-ranked schools), we have graded legal writing plus four or five substantive-law classes first year, while most higher-ranked schools have ungraded legal writing plus three substantive-law classes.  (The number of credits may be similar or the same, but in terms of exam preparation, at least, the number of classes makes a difference.)

TITCR