Law School Discussion

Are some law schools "easier" than others?

t...

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #40 on: September 17, 2007, 10:14:02 AM »
uh, was the consensus that some law schools are easier than others?


Yeah, the higher ranked law schools are - they have more favorable job opps, and tend to have more favorable grading, curves, etc.

But it really depends on you.

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #41 on: September 17, 2007, 10:45:30 AM »


I have had some discussions with professors on this subject. The general consensus of what I have been told is this:

1)Professors tend to give the type of exam they preferred to take in law school (be that open book, closed book, take home)

2)70-100 3,000 word exams would be a huge effort to grade if not for the relatively easy (to grade) issue spotting grade criteria

3)There is a general feeling among law school administers and professors that the role of law school, at least the first year, is to prepare student to take the bar, not to practice law. It is generally thought that time sensitive closed book exams better reflect the kind of preparation for the bar one will need. While the opposite type of exam better reflects the actual work you will do as a lawyer. Our school, after an absolutely miserable showing on the February bar, has now mandated all closed book in class exams. My understanding is this is for all classes, but Iím not sure as it just started. I think past the first year this will do more harm than good for most students.


I think you're missing a key point, which is that while the issue-spotters may be easier to grade, they are also more objective than grading 100 three-hour dissertations on whether or not a bunch of 1Ls think strict liability is superior to negligence.  Not only would a bunch of 1Ls probably not have much intelligent to say on the subject, they would probably just parrot the professors' views in order to get on his good side.   

Why not eight-hour take-home issue-spotters where students can organize their answers more thoughtfully, analogize and distinguish cases more carefully, refer to specific authorities, and spell check, though? I had three of these my first year and I thought they were excellent exams.  Of course, I am very slow.

what are you, a masochist or something?   :o :P

Miss P

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #42 on: September 17, 2007, 10:49:26 AM »
what are you, a masochist or something?   :o :P

The idea is that the professor gives you eight hours for an exam similar to what s/he would give you in class for four.  It makes the exam easier and allows people who need a little time to think and organize their responses a better shot.  In four-hour exams, you prep for approximately 15-30 minutes and spew for the rest of the time.  I frequently fail to finish.

Miss P

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #43 on: September 18, 2007, 08:34:41 AM »
I was just thinking to myself, I wonder what Lindbergh thinks about this issue. 

lol

Kirk Lazarus

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #44 on: September 18, 2007, 08:07:45 PM »
I was just thinking to myself, I wonder what Lindbergh thinks about this issue. 

lol

t...

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #45 on: September 18, 2007, 09:32:42 PM »
I was just thinking to myself, I wonder what Lindbergh thinks about this issue. 

lol



t...

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #46 on: September 24, 2007, 05:20:17 PM »
Most new computers are fine. You might check with your school if you can use a Mac, and/or if they're Vista compatible yet.

You can use your laptop in most classes. Some professors and/or schools either ban wireless access, or laptops altogether, but par for the course is that students will use laptops to take notes. Or rather, they'll @#!* around during class playing games, chatting, and surfing the internet.

Most schools have their own exam software that you'll install on your laptop to take the exams with. There's no worries as to chatting during an exam, though, for a lot of reasons. Also, most schools have an honor code you should follow.

Curves suck. They'll affect you more than anything else in law school, depending on where you go. Which is why you should go cheap, unless you score a top 14 or so.


H4CS

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #47 on: September 24, 2007, 07:49:06 PM »
Most schools have their own exam software that you'll install on your laptop to take the exams with. There's no worries as to chatting during an exam, though, for a lot of reasons. Also, most schools have an honor code you should follow.

I'm not sure if most use software.  Some do, some don't.

Miss P

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Re: Are some law schools "easier" than others?
« Reply #48 on: September 24, 2007, 10:03:59 PM »
Lower-ranked schools are easier to place well in, because the competition pool is less stiff. 

This conclusion was under some dispute.

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