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Author Topic: "Some"  (Read 1147 times)

Ubiquitous law

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"Some"
« on: September 12, 2007, 05:04:07 PM »
Can someone convey how the word "some" could mean "all" in a sentence?

Thanks.
Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.

Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence...

Ubiquitous law

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Re: "Some"
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2007, 05:19:11 PM »



Or is this some smartass thing to set all us September LSATers on edge.

I wouldn't do that, i'm not that cruel! Anyways, I know some = at least one and possibly all, yet I cannot picture "some" as meaning "all" in a sentence. That is all.

I know on the LSAT we can assume it means possibly all, I just wanted an example of how this usage could exist in a regular sentence.

Thanks.
Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.

Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence...

obbear

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Re: "Some"
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2007, 05:37:50 PM »
Anyways, I know some = at least one and possibly all, yet I cannot picture "some" as meaning "all" in a sentence. That is all....

I think I see what you're after (a sentence were the most natural reading of 'some' is 'all' or at least 'nearly all'?), but you're going to have a hard time finding such an example, because 'some' (normally) conversationally implicates 'not all'.  That is, very very roughly, when someone tells you 'Some aliens are green', one of the pieces of information they mean to convey to you is that not all aliens are green.

Not so in the context of an LSAT question, obviously.

Ubiquitous law

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Re: "Some"
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2007, 05:53:12 PM »

Not so in the context of an LSAT question, obviously.

Damn LSAC to heck!
Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.

Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence...

Lindbergh

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Re: "Some"
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2007, 06:59:35 PM »



Or is this some smartass thing to set all us September LSATers on edge.

I know on the LSAT we can assume it means possibly all, I just wanted an example of how this usage could exist in a regular sentence.

Thanks.


Let's say all space aliens are Green.  I went to Venus, and saw some Green Aliens.  I reported back to earth that some aliens are green. Just so happens that some also = all in this context.

obbear

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Re: "Some"
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2007, 07:39:06 PM »
Let's say all space aliens are Green.  I went to Venus, and saw some Green Aliens.  I reported back to earth that some aliens are green. Just so happens that some also = all in this context.

Let's see.  All aliens are green, but in reporting "some aliens are green", do you take yourself to be suggesting that all aliens are green?  I think you're reporting something much weaker than that.

Ubiquitous law

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Re: "Some"
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2007, 08:18:25 PM »



Or is this some smartass thing to set all us September LSATers on edge.

I know on the LSAT we can assume it means possibly all, I just wanted an example of how this usage could exist in a regular sentence.

Thanks.


Let's say all space aliens are Green.  I went to Venus, and saw some Green Aliens.  I reported back to earth that some aliens are green. Just so happens that some also = all in this context.

Ok, that makes a little more sense. Thanks for the clarification.

Basically (Correct me if im wrong), the planet has only green aliens, but you don't get to see all of them. So you use the term "some" green aliens were seen, eventhough the chance exists "all" the aliens are green since you weren't able to witness every alien on the planet.
Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.

Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence...

non parata est

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Re: "Some"
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2007, 10:57:13 PM »
Just think of "some" as meaning "at least one," and you should be fine.
Quote from: Lionel Hutz, Esq.
Well he's had it in for me ever since I kinda ran over his dog... Well, replace the word "kinda" with "repeatedly" and the word "dog" with "son."

Lindbergh

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Re: "Some"
« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2007, 12:58:50 AM »
Just think of "some" as meaning "at least one," and you should be fine.

TC

non parata est

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Re: "Some"
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2007, 01:07:39 AM »
This'll sound n00bish, but what do all of these acronyms mean?  My lurking has endowed me with the knowledge of TTT, but what about TC, HTH, and TTCR?
Quote from: Lionel Hutz, Esq.
Well he's had it in for me ever since I kinda ran over his dog... Well, replace the word "kinda" with "repeatedly" and the word "dog" with "son."