Law School Discussion

"Some"

"Some"
« on: September 12, 2007, 03:04:07 PM »
Can someone convey how the word "some" could mean "all" in a sentence?

Thanks.

Re: "Some"
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2007, 03:19:11 PM »



Or is this some smartass thing to set all us September LSATers on edge.

I wouldn't do that, i'm not that cruel! Anyways, I know some = at least one and possibly all, yet I cannot picture "some" as meaning "all" in a sentence. That is all.

I know on the LSAT we can assume it means possibly all, I just wanted an example of how this usage could exist in a regular sentence.

Thanks.

Re: "Some"
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2007, 03:37:50 PM »
Anyways, I know some = at least one and possibly all, yet I cannot picture "some" as meaning "all" in a sentence. That is all....

I think I see what you're after (a sentence were the most natural reading of 'some' is 'all' or at least 'nearly all'?), but you're going to have a hard time finding such an example, because 'some' (normally) conversationally implicates 'not all'.  That is, very very roughly, when someone tells you 'Some aliens are green', one of the pieces of information they mean to convey to you is that not all aliens are green.

Not so in the context of an LSAT question, obviously.

Re: "Some"
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2007, 03:53:12 PM »

Not so in the context of an LSAT question, obviously.

Damn LSAC to heck!

Re: "Some"
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2007, 05:39:06 PM »
Let's say all space aliens are Green.  I went to Venus, and saw some Green Aliens.  I reported back to earth that some aliens are green. Just so happens that some also = all in this context.

Let's see.  All aliens are green, but in reporting "some aliens are green", do you take yourself to be suggesting that all aliens are green?  I think you're reporting something much weaker than that.

Re: "Some"
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2007, 06:18:25 PM »



Or is this some smartass thing to set all us September LSATers on edge.

I know on the LSAT we can assume it means possibly all, I just wanted an example of how this usage could exist in a regular sentence.

Thanks.


Let's say all space aliens are Green.  I went to Venus, and saw some Green Aliens.  I reported back to earth that some aliens are green. Just so happens that some also = all in this context.

Ok, that makes a little more sense. Thanks for the clarification.

Basically (Correct me if im wrong), the planet has only green aliens, but you don't get to see all of them. So you use the term "some" green aliens were seen, eventhough the chance exists "all" the aliens are green since you weren't able to witness every alien on the planet.

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Re: "Some"
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2007, 08:57:13 PM »
Just think of "some" as meaning "at least one," and you should be fine.

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Re: "Some"
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2007, 11:07:39 PM »
This'll sound n00bish, but what do all of these acronyms mean?  My lurking has endowed me with the knowledge of TTT, but what about TC, HTH, and TTCR?

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Re: "Some"
« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2007, 01:13:48 AM »
Let's see.  All aliens are green, but in reporting "some aliens are green", do you take yourself to be suggesting that all aliens are green?  I think you're reporting something much weaker than that.

He's reporting something weaker than "all," but logically leaving open the possibility of all.  The problem with words like some, most, many, and few is that their literal meaning and their suggested meaning are two different things.

If I have six pencils that are red, and I tell you one of them is red, that's true.  One is red.  (Notice I didn't say ONLY one)  If I instead say some are red, that's also true.  Some of them are indeed red.  If I say most are red, that's also true--more than half of them are red.  If I say all of them are red, that's true again.  The fact that one pencil is red does not preclude the rest from being red.  Nor does the fact that two, or some, or most are as well.  Each of these quantity words suggests a different thing and each reveals a different amount of concrete information, but each is also an accurate statement and none preclude there from being. in this case, more red pencils than suggested.

Re: "Some"
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2007, 02:43:52 AM »
I think the key here is that "does not exclude" =! "means"

"Some" does not exclude "all". However, it does not necessarily mean all.

True: All -> some

Not necessarily true: Some -> all.  (though could be true)


And now I think my brain has imploded.