Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?  (Read 16271 times)

Ninja1

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 3089
  • ☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2009, 04:11:25 PM »
It is absolute BS, thats how I feel about it. There is no more unjust law that exists in the country. If the governemnt really wanted to help those who grew up in difficult learning environments, they should helping those with low family incomes, not just any random person who happened to be part of a race.

I grew up in poverty and all my friends were black. I grew up with every type of learning disadvantage that the stereotypical  "URM" went through, but since my skin color belongs to an "overrepresented" group, I'm expected to score over 10 points higher on the LSAT just to be considered an equal in the eyes of admission boards to "URMs" that grew up in my neighhborhood.

So damn true.
I'mma stay bumpin' till I bump my head on my tomb.

Jay Jay

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 11
    • View Profile
Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #21 on: April 16, 2009, 03:23:35 AM »
I'm proud to check the Asian box on applications.  I don't care if they use it against me or for me (which I sometimes suspect it's more a con than a pro).  As far as warped AA goes, I have always held this opinion: if a school decides to reject me based on my heritage/color/culture, than they do not deserve to have me.  There are too many other (better) schools that want me for my accomplishments, it's not worth wasting my time with schools that have bigots in their administrations.
In: UMich, UVA, G'town, UCLA, Duke
Out: Berkeley
Waitlist: Yale
No Response: UChicago, Stanford, Harvard, NYU, UPenn

Contract2008

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 930
    • View Profile
Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #22 on: July 12, 2009, 01:22:57 AM »
I'm proud to check the Asian box on applications.  I don't care if they use it against me or for me (which I sometimes suspect it's more a con than a pro).  As far as warped AA goes, I have always held this opinion: if a school decides to reject me based on my heritage/color/culture, than they do not deserve to have me.  There are too many other (better) schools that want me for my accomplishments, it's not worth wasting my time with schools that have bigots in their administrations.

What if a school has bigots in their administrations accepts you because your scores are much higher than their median?  You could be attending a school with bigots and not even know it.


Gary Glitter

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 525
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #23 on: July 12, 2009, 02:00:53 AM »
our supposed innate smartness sometimes surpasses itself

this just might win the award for the single most racist post of the year. on a related note, asian american populations have median IQs that mirror those of their white counterparts. for example, the chinese american population has a median IQ of 100. the median IQ in the US is 99. yet despite this figure, chinese americans achieve within society at a rate that you'd expect from a population with a median IQ with 120. why is this so? it's explained through culture and the emphasis that chinese americans place on education. you can see this discrepancy play out between the races; additionally, you can see it amongst the asian sub-populations themselves [more specfically, chinese americans achieve at a rate commensuate to a group with a median IQ of 120, while japanese american achieve at a rate predicted for a group of 110 (despite having the same actual median IQ of 100)]. it is thus not some sort of brand of "innate smartness" that drives the asians to greater success; instead, it is the cultural emphasis that allows them to achieve within american society at the rates that they do.

re asians and AA: if applying to any CA school, being asian is an absolute penalty. for a # of the elite east coast schools, however, being asian still confers a benefit and counts to the school's overall diversity quota. so really, it's not a complete curse - yes, schools like stan and boalt are going to penalize you, but H,Y, Columbia, etc. are going to look for you on the basis that you are still somewhat unique. think of it this way: it could be worse, you could be white (strike one), male (strike two), and from a wealthy family (strike 3), at which point nothing short a 176 is going to carry you into a t10 school.
The Good:Harvard, Stanford
The Bad:
The Ugly: Yale

Contract2008

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 930
    • View Profile
Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #24 on: July 12, 2009, 11:21:10 AM »

re asians and AA: if applying to any CA school, being asian is an absolute penalty. for a # of the elite east coast schools, however, being asian still confers a benefit and counts to the school's overall diversity quota. so really, it's not a complete curse - yes, schools like stan and boalt are going to penalize you, but H,Y, Columbia, etc. are going to look for you on the basis that you are still somewhat unique. think of it this way: it could be worse, you could be white (strike one), male (strike two), and from a wealthy family (strike 3), at which point nothing short a 176 is going to carry you into a t10 school.

Wrong!  Asians make up about 5% of the population and more than 5% of these schools' students are Asians.  They are NOT unique at all.  This is especially true for East Asians (Chinese, Japanese, and Korean).  They have more "strikes" than a typical white male. 

smartandunique

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 96
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #25 on: March 31, 2011, 01:48:41 PM »
. Many minorities have been discrimated against-Not like Black Americans.(slavery, reconstruction, Jim Crow, segregation and disenfranchisement. The Civil Rights Act wasnít passed until the 60ís.

. Black Americans are the only group of Americans who werenít immigrants. We helped build a country that wouldnít allow us to fully participate in.

Test arenít biased against minorities, they are biased against people who werenít properly educated. This is connected to discrimination because discrimination affects where people live,work and where their children will be educated  and the type of teachers that school attracts. Schools had to be created so black people with aspirations of being an attorney could pursue their dream.

Even if you havenít been discriminated against as a minority, I bet your giving the benefit of the doubt.
Do you question the ability of white women, people from rural areas, children of alumni etc..or other beneficiaries of preferential programs. If so, why didnít you originally address them in your post?

I don't know what your intent is but I think it is insulting to the point of being offensive to compare an immigrant expierence to a black American's.

FalconJimmy

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 684
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #26 on: March 31, 2011, 02:15:03 PM »
. Black Americans are the only group of Americans who werenít immigrants. We helped build a country that wouldnít allow us to fully participate in.

Native Americans.


Test arenít biased against minorities, they are biased against people who werenít properly educated. This is connected to discrimination because discrimination affects where people live,work and where their children will be educated  and the type of teachers that school attracts. Schools had to be created so black people with aspirations of being an attorney could pursue their dream.

I agree with this, but wouldn't the answer then be to grant additional priviledges to people from underpriviledged backgrounds, regardless of race?


Even if you havenít been discriminated against as a minority, I bet your giving the benefit of the doubt.
Do you question the ability of white women, people from rural areas, children of alumni etc..or other beneficiaries of preferential programs. If so, why didnít you originally address them in your post?

I'm not sure that women really benefit very much from affirmative action, except for certain initiatives to include greater numbers of women in the sciences.  In many academic disciplines, white women are over-represented.

Children of Alums?  I'd say that's an evil that universities take part in out of practical concerns.  If that's your counter argument, then what you're really saying is that affirmative action is evil, but that's okay because other things are evil, too.



I don't know what your intent is but I think it is insulting to the point of being offensive to compare an immigrant expierence to a black American's.

To you, perhaps.  Others might find it insulting to the point of being offensive that some folks would chose to shut down discussion of this possibility.

smartandunique

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 96
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #27 on: March 31, 2011, 04:00:04 PM »
I'm not sure that women really benefit very much from affirmative action, except for certain initiatives to include greater numbers of women in the sciences.  In many academic disciplines, white women are over-represented-Then you need to do better research.


To you, perhaps.  Others might find it insulting to the point of being offensive that some folks would chose to shut down discussion of this possibility.-That isn't what I was doing. I was giving my opinion, like everyone else.


FalconJimmy

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 684
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #28 on: March 31, 2011, 05:24:30 PM »
Then you need to do better research.

Hmmm... so, that's what a smart and unique rejoinder looks like.  Who knew.

As far as my "research", its been pretty solidly documented that affirmative action has generally been used, in this century, to increase the presence of MALE college students, not female.

Where they're banned, male enrollment drops.

http://diverseeducation.com/article/10672/

Have a nice life.

smartandunique

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 96
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #29 on: April 01, 2011, 07:55:32 AM »
Again-work on your research skills-Your article states select universities,I'm talking about affirmative action -period.
I will have a great life!!