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Author Topic: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?  (Read 15924 times)

vercingetorix

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Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2008, 12:05:55 AM »
yeah, i think AA is for those other filthy minorities!

simonsays

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Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #11 on: January 02, 2008, 06:40:40 PM »

AA is a poison pill, you're better off not swallowing.


JnJ

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Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #12 on: May 20, 2008, 03:46:17 AM »
I feel like Asian Americans are more likely to be hurt by AA than your average white person.  Asian Americans tend to have higher GPAs and test scores than whites, and many programs are heavily overrepresented in Asian Americans.  Several of the top schools in the nation have percentages of 14-20% of their students in a given program being Asian, while the national population of Asian Americans is a mere 4.4%!

With that being said, when a member of another minority pushes through that application with substandard scores, is it really a white student who is going to be bumped?  Or is it going to be one of the many high scoring, high GPA Asian Americans who are already stretching the diversity quotient?

kono

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Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #13 on: June 25, 2008, 10:23:06 AM »
It was quite disturbing when the University of Michigan Law School had the hearings on their race based policies. In every cell (gpa and lsat) the lowest acceptance rate was for Asian's. How unfair and racially biased. Checking the race box is a self determination, and even if you have an Asian sounding name, you are likely better off checking "other" or caucasian.

drfaiso1

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Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #14 on: December 18, 2008, 10:28:34 PM »
There are 2 things I hate in life.....Racism

and minorities
Well I hope u do well representing the klan...ooh i know...give us all literacy tests...mayb we past then masta!

kennedyposter

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Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #15 on: December 22, 2008, 11:30:28 PM »
Botton line-this should all be based on economic disadvantage, not race. Bottom line.

noumena

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Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #16 on: January 18, 2009, 12:57:57 PM »
In my opinion, AA should be treated as an honest and sincere method of addressing and redressing past offenses; it's meant to palliate past atrocities committed by the US government. Sure, Asians are often held to higher standards, and our supposed innate smartness sometimes surpasses itself, but as I said, AA is an issue of history, not socioeconomic background. The socioeconomic factor, believe it or not, isn't ignored by admissions committees. That's what need-blind admissions exists for preventing.

While you, 1654134681665465, have a point in claiming that "America was founded on the principle that a person succeeds (or fails) through their efforts and not because of who they are," this doesn't excuse America from accounting for her actions. I'm sure science will one day prove that the lack of inherent intelligence some of you guys seem to imply is at the root of AA with its unfairly modified standards was actually caused by those same privileges being denied to Native Americans and African Americans, among others, generation after generation after generation. We haven't been victimized as systematically and as unjustifiably as African Americans have historically; that is to say our hopes and desires haven't been so magnificently impeded by Protean American "principles." The concept of URM is meant to identify members belonging to those groups which, owing to the sudden occupancy of the British, were brusquely displaced and subsequently denied privileges that these people arrogated to themselves as rights. A relatively lesser level of accomplishment is reasonably and should be judged less harshly as a result.

If my theory is baloney, at least the fear that led to AA is real and should not be brushed aside so quickly as some ridiculous vagary. I think as Asians, we should be proud we are judged by higher standards than others.


iahurricane

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Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #17 on: March 18, 2009, 03:51:47 AM »
It is absolute BS, thats how I feel about it. There is no more unjust law that exists in the country. If the governemnt really wanted to help those who grew up in difficult learning environments, they should helping those with low family incomes, not just any random person who happened to be part of a race.

I grew up in poverty and all my friends were black. I grew up with every type of learning disadvantage that the stereotypical  "URM" went through, but since my skin color belongs to an "overrepresented" group, I'm expected to score over 10 points higher on the LSAT just to be considered an equal in the eyes of admission boards to "URMs" that grew up in my neighhborhood.

Just Wrong

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Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #18 on: March 22, 2009, 03:34:38 PM »
Would any of you rather be black?

Ninja1

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Re: How do my fellow asians feel about AA?
« Reply #19 on: March 26, 2009, 04:07:47 PM »
4)  Many minorities have been discriminated

me:  I haven't, at least I hope I didn't...


I been discriminated primarily by other minority groups... funny how minorities love bitching about racism but they'll be the first to use racial slurs

I was sure non-black minorities were going to cost Obama the election if anyone was going to. They almost cost him the nomination early on.
I'mma stay bumpin' till I bump my head on my tomb.