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Author Topic: Life as a 2L  (Read 7867 times)

blk_reign

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Re: Life as a 2L
« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2007, 09:03:05 PM »
i thought so...

cuz you forgot that Peachtree Street is a one way street

Peachtree is definitely two-way.
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Life as a 2L
« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2007, 01:49:05 PM »
2L is a busy-azz year.  Interviewing for a job IS a job.  Plus, if you belong to any group at all, you more than likely have taken an active leadership position during 2L, not to mention Moot Court, Law Review, judicial externship, BLSA conventions, [fill in the blank], etc.  Just busy.

Don't get me started on BLSA. Why in the hell did they pick Detroit of all places for the National Convention? Don't they know it's COLD in Detroit in March? Plus somebody gonna get shot, all them bougie black folx in suits, somebody is gonna get shot, then stabbed, and maybe shot again for good measure.



The national convention rotates through each region every year.  It was supposed to be in Chicago next spring but they moved it to Detroit to save $ for all of you conference goers because the Chicago hotels were going to make everybody pay something crazy, and Detroit's hotel (where the NBA conference was August 2006) is half the price and is actually a nice hotel and it meets the needs in terms of numbers and space.  Should be a good look.
"A lawyer's either a social engineer or a parasite on society. A social engineer is a highly skilled...lawyer who understands the Constitution of the U.S. and knows how to explore its uses in the solving of problems of local communities and in bettering [our] conditions."
Charles H. Houston

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Life as a 2L
« Reply #12 on: August 29, 2007, 03:23:22 PM »
LMAO.

Don't get me started on BLSA. Why in the hell did they pick Detroit of all places for the National Convention? Don't they know it's COLD in Detroit in March? Plus somebody gonna get shot, all them bougie black folx in suits, somebody is gonna get shot, then stabbed, and maybe shot again for good measure.

They need to just keep it in Atlanta and make everybody happy.

 :D


Seriously, at least in Atlanta there is little to no chance that somebody will rob you for your Chinchilla or Fur coat, cuz it's too damn hot for that down here. At most, you might get lost cuz you forgot that Peachtree Street is a one way street and that it is completely different than Peachtree Center, or Peachtree Ave. or Peachtree Battle or the dozen other streets named Peachtree.

I thought Lawyers were supposed to specialize in SOLVING problems, not making more?

since when?

That's what they told me when they took my $$$ this semester and the two previous ones. I still believe the concept of "Law School" is really just a cash-cow for Major Universities. How much does it really cost to have some brainiac former Supreme Court Clerk stand in a room of naive over-achievers and discuss the underlying philosophies of the law and give RIDICULOUS situations that probably will never occur in real life?

This is some Amway-type hustlin' goin' on!



Now you're on to something.  This whole law school system that we know today is more so driven by the mighty dollar than the pursuit of legal knowledge.

Don't ask me why, but I ran across this book that was talking about the history of law school (yeah I need a job) and it was talking about how from 1776 until the 1900's, the first lawyers in this country didn't even go to law school at all, but instead just shadowed another lawyer as an apprentice until they were ready to take some type of test in front of a judge; the format of which basically changed from judge to judge.  Law Schools didn't even start to come about until the  1800's, and even then, you could go straight to law school without having to go to college first (or at all), and formal legal education was still not required in order to be admitted to the bar - you could still go the apprenticeship route.

As more and more cats started gaining access to legal education and the ability to practice law, the collective bar associations started to change the game up. 

First rule: No more apprenticeship admits - you gotta go through law school, thus making law schools the official gatekeepers. 
Second rule: No more going straight to law school - you must have college credentials to even apply to law school.  And speaking of applying to law schools...
Third Rule: No more of this unregulated, discretionary law school admission stuff - the LSAT is created in 1947.

Once these systems were in place, universities were able to monopolize total access to the legal profession and began to add law schools to their campuses as a means of raising revenues.


There was a whole lot more to it that I left out, but that was the book's general gist.  TruOne's post reminded me of that book and the state of things for law school education so I thought I'd throw that out there as food for thought.



"A lawyer's either a social engineer or a parasite on society. A social engineer is a highly skilled...lawyer who understands the Constitution of the U.S. and knows how to explore its uses in the solving of problems of local communities and in bettering [our] conditions."
Charles H. Houston

cui bono?

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Re: Life as a 2L
« Reply #13 on: August 29, 2007, 03:37:36 PM »
LOL, what book was that?
I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality...  I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word - -Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King

A.

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Re: Life as a 2L
« Reply #14 on: August 29, 2007, 03:48:16 PM »
Lol the first law schools were basically just copying profs' lectures (which were just expositions of the law) verbatim to create your own law books.  Tedious and boring.  Law didn't get interesting until the socratic method came around.

t...

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Re: Life as a 2L
« Reply #15 on: August 29, 2007, 03:58:44 PM »
In some states you don't necessarily have to go to law school to sit for (and hopefully pass) the bar.

Good luck finding a job, though.

Anyway, carry on...
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i rhink tyi'm inejying my fudgcicle too much

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I went to a party in an apartment in a silo once.

jd06

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Re: Life as a 2L
« Reply #16 on: August 29, 2007, 03:59:34 PM »
I remember reading that law school history stuff as an introduction to a PR text somewhere along the line.  In addition to the revenune raising function, and perhaps more importantly to many bar members, extraordinarily expensive law schools with extremely high admissions standards serve to ensure that the profession generally remains open only to the privileged.  I was a non-traditional student (working full-time while attending ls part-time at night).  Were it not for that opportunity I wouldn't be a lawyer.  I don't think the same is afforded to prospective students in many other states (I'm in CA) and that's a shame.  Witness all the ranting and raving on sites like this about "Big Law" and "T-14's." Nothing wrong with those endeavors but there's a lot more to the profession than that.  A lot of that talk simply harkens back to the history of the profession as one for only the privileged.      

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Life as a 2L
« Reply #17 on: August 29, 2007, 04:01:07 PM »
LOL, what book was that?

One of those getting into law school books I have in my closet.  It was something like "Law School Today" or "Getting into Law School Today" or something like that.  I can dig it up if ya'll want. 

It's funny, I find myself skimming through these books every now and again now that it's all said and done - I find it interesting to see what other folks thought would be important for entering 1L's to know about getting into law school and just what folks write about law school in general.  For most of it, I read it and nod my head like "yup, that definitely happened," but on some of the other stuff I'm like "ehhh... not so much."


"A lawyer's either a social engineer or a parasite on society. A social engineer is a highly skilled...lawyer who understands the Constitution of the U.S. and knows how to explore its uses in the solving of problems of local communities and in bettering [our] conditions."
Charles H. Houston

cui bono?

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Re: Life as a 2L
« Reply #18 on: August 29, 2007, 04:16:41 PM »
In some states you don't necessarily have to go to law school to sit for (and hopefully pass) the bar.

Good luck finding a job, though.

Anyway, carry on...

man, bump that, where?  how soon do u think I can move?  :D  j/k

LOL, what book was that?

One of those getting into law school books I have in my closet.  It was something like "Law School Today" or "Getting into Law School Today" or something like that.  I can dig it up if ya'll want. 

It's funny, I find myself skimming through these books every now and again now that it's all said and done - I find it interesting to see what other folks thought would be important for entering 1L's to know about getting into law school and just what folks write about law school in general.  For most of it, I read it and nod my head like "yup, that definitely happened," but on some of the other stuff I'm like "ehhh... not so much."




Oh okay, I got plenty of those in my closet both here and in NY  :D  I like digging those  out only to read some little crazy uninformed note I wrote to myself in the margin.  Ah memories  :D
I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality...  I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word - -Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Life as a 2L
« Reply #19 on: August 29, 2007, 04:28:38 PM »
I remember reading that law school history stuff as an introduction to a PR text somewhere along the line.  In addition to the revenune raising function, and perhaps more importantly to many bar members, extraordinarily expensive law schools with extremely high admissions standards serve to ensure that the profession generally remains open only to the privileged.  I was a non-traditional student (working full-time while attending ls part-time at night).  Were it not for that opportunity I wouldn't be a lawyer.  I don't think the same is afforded to prospective students in many other states (I'm in CA) and that's a shame.  Witness all the ranting and raving on sites like this about "Big Law" and "T-14's." Nothing wrong with those endeavors but there's a lot more to the profession than that.  A lot of that talk simply harkens back to the history of the profession as one for only the privileged.     


We may have to start a whole new thread for this convo, but this statement is definitely on point!  I have read that in a few different places before (in addition to being told by numerous practitioners) - something along the lines of the fact that this nation was founded by lawyers for lawyers and access to the law is one of the most coveted and protected prizes in our society.

In addition to the many hurdles one has to jump in order to even gain access to the law in the first place, the "rankings" ensure that if you didn't gain access to the law from the right school then your access is perceived as less than the next man's access. Thus, whether done wittingly or unwittingly, the ranking-whores serve to maintain that elite level of law reserved for the privileged since legal education itself no longer can do so as effectively as it used to before the advent of evening programs, part-time programs, non-accredited law schools and the like.

"A lawyer's either a social engineer or a parasite on society. A social engineer is a highly skilled...lawyer who understands the Constitution of the U.S. and knows how to explore its uses in the solving of problems of local communities and in bettering [our] conditions."
Charles H. Houston