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Author Topic: Miami legal market  (Read 18122 times)

Lindbergh

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Re: Miami legal market
« Reply #60 on: August 09, 2007, 10:27:35 AM »
Miami is where I want to practice; however, my main interests are criminal defense, personal injury and all things trial law which makes me wonder if the market in Miami is conducive towards building a successful practice since I plan on  focusing on those areas of the law. (I canít work for anybody but myself so Biglaw is out of the question). I plan on learning both Spanish and Portuguese after I graduate undergrad and during my 3 years (possibly 4 If I go for a MBA) of graduate school. How does market  for the above mentioned law areas in terms of building a lucrative practice? Also, I know that being a t14 is good and thing but hopefully it is not the deciding factor. Even with my potentiol raw scores I still think YHS is a crap shoot.

homicides and accidents don't believe in geographic restrictions. neither should you.

The key is whether they are lucrative. I know that in Tampa criminal defense is not lucrative at all because there simply aren't that many wealthy criminal clients. That may or may not be the case in Miami, but it's something this poster wants to research before diving in.


I'm assuming there are some pretty loaded drug dealers in Miami.

Lindbergh

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Re: Miami legal market
« Reply #61 on: August 09, 2007, 10:28:40 AM »
Well if I could prosecute Latin American dictators I'd make a killing in Miami ;)


Unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on your perspective), it's not usually illegal to be a latin american dictator.

cui bono?

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Re: Miami legal market
« Reply #62 on: August 09, 2007, 10:29:42 AM »
LOL @ Llindbergh, Lindbergh,Lindbergh, Lindbergh  :D
I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality...  I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word - -Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King

Lindbergh

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Re: Miami legal market
« Reply #63 on: August 09, 2007, 10:32:26 AM »
This is an interesting comment posted on the ATL Miami comments:



I was just a 3L at UM and I love Miami, but here's one secret:

I don't speak Spanish or Portuguese, but when you do OCI, they don't even mention anything about having to speak those languages on any job descriptions. Then, when you show up to the interview, they give you this huge, blank stare when you say you can't speak Spanish/Portuguese. If you can't speak Spanish or Portuguese, be prepared to work in the Fort Lauderdale or West Palm Beach offices, not the shiny ones on Brickell Avenue.

http://www.abovethelaw.com/2007/08/fall_recruiting_open_thread_mi_1.php

This isn't much of a surprise. I've known large firms that advertise screening interviews for offices that don't hire any new/summer associates. There are also IP firms that don't advertise a specific specialty desired and then when people apply and get into the screening interview, the interview will say "Oh we really only wanted mechanical engineers" even though the screeners had the person's background in front of them when choosing him/her to interview.


This sounds more like just an excuse for dinging applicants they personally dislike.  Given what these attorneys bill out at, it wouldn't make much sense to interview candidates clearly lacking requisite skills.

Lindbergh

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Re: Miami legal market
« Reply #64 on: August 09, 2007, 10:32:56 AM »
Hhhhmmmmmmm....

Looks like I haven't gotten a straight answer yet.  ;D

Quite a debate on this issue, if I end up going there I guess I should take Spanish classes as a precaution.


It will probably help.

Lindbergh

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Re: Miami legal market
« Reply #65 on: August 09, 2007, 10:34:15 AM »
Hhhhmmmmmmm....

Looks like I haven't gotten a straight answer yet.  ;D

Quite a debate on this issue, if I end up going there I guess I should take Spanish classes as a precaution.

Yeah, you will learn Spanish well enough to practice law in no time.


Doesn't seem like he'll actually need to practice in Spanish, unless he's doing foriegn regulatory work -- it may just be helpful for some correspondence, interactions, etc.

Lindbergh

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Re: Miami legal market
« Reply #66 on: August 09, 2007, 10:35:57 AM »
LOL @ Llindbergh, Lindbergh,Lindbergh, Lindbergh  :D


Repetition is the key.  ;)

I haven't seen this thread in awhile, and feel compelled to answer every reply.

queencruella

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Re: Miami legal market
« Reply #67 on: August 09, 2007, 10:36:23 AM »
This is an interesting comment posted on the ATL Miami comments:



I was just a 3L at UM and I love Miami, but here's one secret:

I don't speak Spanish or Portuguese, but when you do OCI, they don't even mention anything about having to speak those languages on any job descriptions. Then, when you show up to the interview, they give you this huge, blank stare when you say you can't speak Spanish/Portuguese. If you can't speak Spanish or Portuguese, be prepared to work in the Fort Lauderdale or West Palm Beach offices, not the shiny ones on Brickell Avenue.

http://www.abovethelaw.com/2007/08/fall_recruiting_open_thread_mi_1.php

This isn't much of a surprise. I've known large firms that advertise screening interviews for offices that don't hire any new/summer associates. There are also IP firms that don't advertise a specific specialty desired and then when people apply and get into the screening interview, the interview will say "Oh we really only wanted mechanical engineers" even though the screeners had the person's background in front of them when choosing him/her to interview.


This sounds more like just an excuse for dinging applicants they personally dislike.  Given what these attorneys bill out at, it wouldn't make much sense to interview candidates clearly lacking requisite skills.

I've known someone who went into an interview, actually knew one of the interviewers beforehand who said "Oh it will be great, don't worry" only to get in and have the other interviewer say, "We aren't really looking for X type of engineer right now" right off the bat. The second interviewer didn't even have time to get to know the person. \

As for the drug crimes- a ton are routed to Tampa right now. I've seen some people go to trial who were pretty high up on the chain but they still got a CJA attorney or a public defender.

cui bono?

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Re: Miami legal market
« Reply #68 on: August 09, 2007, 10:37:16 AM »
LOL @ Llindbergh, Lindbergh,Lindbergh, Lindbergh  :D


Repetition is the key.  ;)

I haven't seen this thread in awhile, and feel compelled to answer every reply.

 lol,cool   ;) :) 
I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality...  I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word - -Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King

burge322

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Re: Miami legal market
« Reply #69 on: August 09, 2007, 10:46:12 AM »
How good would one's spanish have to be exactly?  I can speak and write french perfectly (probably not that useful in Miami) and I can speak functional conversational spanish.  I could by no means however write a decent legal document in spanish.  Are they looking for people who generally understand spanish to corresond with other offices etc/or are they actually looking for people to do a bulk of their practicing of law in Spanish?