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Author Topic: Kaplan?  (Read 1945 times)

jumpyoulikeabattery

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Kaplan?
« on: August 03, 2007, 10:44:54 PM »
Does anyone have any positive remarks about the class?

LSATstruggle

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Re: Kaplan?
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2007, 09:29:08 AM »
Get your money back ASAP. And run.

Tinkle45

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Re: Kaplan?
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2007, 10:59:00 AM »
Get your money back ASAP. And run.


 :D :D :D
Yeah, i heard that as well. You will be better off without taking Kraplan
Being deprived of summer fun better be worth it

madoka

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Re: Kaplan?
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2007, 04:03:03 PM »
I would ask for a refund ASAP.  The problem with Kaplan and PR for that matter is that their instructors only need to score in the 163-164 range and they only need to do it on a PRACTICE TEST!  They likely may never have taken a real LSAT before in their life.  I've had students complain that their friends become instructors for these companies and they know nothing/little about the test.

The problem with TM, PS, and BP is that many of their instructors are essentially temps.  They are doing this to make some money before heading out to law school, therefore they don't ever invest much effort in teaching techniques, learning about the LSAT in depth or the admissions process. 

Since your instructor is the primary factor in course satisfaction, you should inquire about their qualifications before signing up for any course.

Kitty782

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Re: Kaplan?
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2007, 04:23:18 PM »
I would ask for a refund ASAP.  The problem with Kaplan and PR for that matter is that their instructors only need to score in the 163-164 range and they only need to do it on a PRACTICE TEST!  They likely may never have taken a real LSAT before in their life.  I've had students complain that their friends become instructors for these companies and they know nothing/little about the test.

The problem with TM, PS, and BP is that many of their instructors are essentially temps.  They are doing this to make some money before heading out to law school, therefore they don't ever invest much effort in teaching techniques, learning about the LSAT in depth or the admissions process. 

Since your instructor is the primary factor in course satisfaction, you should inquire about their qualifications before signing up for any course.

That's entirely untrue.  All Kaplan test people have to score in the 95th percentile or above on an actual LSAT.  Where are you getting that information from? 

I had a great experience with Kaplan.  My score went up 10 points from what I was testing at before and I didn't really study that much outside of class.  I learn very well in a classroom setting, so it was great for me.
Fordham 2010

Eveman in Ingmarland

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Re: Kaplan?
« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2007, 04:45:52 PM »
This is really more of a rant than a direct response to the OP's question, but here's my big problem with Kaplan, PR, and prep courses generally. They are not geared towards people who are trying to get 172+ scores.

In order to have a realistic shot at the 99th percentile, you need to be able to understand every type of problem you might encounter going into the test.

On games, you need to be able to get through the entire section, consistently, averaging no more than maybe 2 misses.

On arguments, you need to be able to work fast enough that you'll have time to go through the parallel reasoning questions carefully.

On reading, you need to be able to get through the entire section without rushing, and without missing questions.

In short, the strategies that the test prep companies put forward (such as skipping the hardest game, longest LR questions, etc.) are great if you're just aiming for the 90th percentile, but useless if you are aiming for the top.

For example, diagramming LR questions will ensure that you get something like 20 questions per section right, but if you do it this way, you won't have enough time to get to the other 4 questions per section.

But I'm just speaking from my own experience, as someone who only self-prepped. Is there anyone out there who got a gigantic score and found taking a course useful?

LSATstruggle

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Re: Kaplan?
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2007, 06:00:33 PM »

That's entirely untrue.  All Kaplan test people have to score in the 95th percentile or above on an actual LSAT.  Where are you getting that information from? 


Try looking at the Kaplan Craigslist ads in the jobs section for any major city.
http://losangeles.craigslist.org/lac/edu/388451593.html
(this ad was posted yesterday)

Part-Time GMAT, GRE, LSAT, DAT, and MCAT Instructors (6-20 hrs/wk):

    * Our minimum score requirements are as follows: GMAT: 680 LSAT: 164 GRE: 1400 (combined) DAT: 20-21 (per section) MCAT: 11 (on each section for which you wish to teach)
    * If your scores are more than five years old, you may take a qualifying test at any Kaplan center.
    * Classes are held in our centers as well as throughout the community. Those willing to travel must have access to transportation (mileage compensated in line with prevailing policy).
    * No teaching experience is necessary (although it is preferred). We will train you to be a great instructor. Prep and training are paid.



My teacher has never taken the LSAT. And you can tell.  She does not understand the special " unless rule"

Lindbergh

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Re: Kaplan?
« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2007, 06:58:27 PM »
I would ask for a refund ASAP.  The problem with Kaplan and PR for that matter is that their instructors only need to score in the 163-164 range and they only need to do it on a PRACTICE TEST!  They likely may never have taken a real LSAT before in their life.  I've had students complain that their friends become instructors for these companies and they know nothing/little about the test.

The problem with TM, PS, and BP is that many of their instructors are essentially temps.  They are doing this to make some money before heading out to law school, therefore they don't ever invest much effort in teaching techniques, learning about the LSAT in depth or the admissions process. 

Since your instructor is the primary factor in course satisfaction, you should inquire about their qualifications before signing up for any course.

That's entirely untrue.  All Kaplan test people have to score in the 95th percentile or above on an actual LSAT.  Where are you getting that information from? 

I had a great experience with Kaplan.  My score went up 10 points from what I was testing at before and I didn't really study that much outside of class.  I learn very well in a classroom setting, so it was great for me.


Depending on the market, it's often only 90th percentile.  (Formerly a 163, currently a 164.)

Lindbergh

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Re: Kaplan?
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2007, 07:01:52 PM »
This is really more of a rant than a direct response to the OP's question, but here's my big problem with Kaplan, PR, and prep courses generally. They are not geared towards people who are trying to get 172+ scores.

In order to have a realistic shot at the 99th percentile, you need to be able to understand every type of problem you might encounter going into the test.

On games, you need to be able to get through the entire section, consistently, averaging no more than maybe 2 misses.

On arguments, you need to be able to work fast enough that you'll have time to go through the parallel reasoning questions carefully.

On reading, you need to be able to get through the entire section without rushing, and without missing questions.

In short, the strategies that the test prep companies put forward (such as skipping the hardest game, longest LR questions, etc.) are great if you're just aiming for the 90th percentile, but useless if you are aiming for the top.

For example, diagramming LR questions will ensure that you get something like 20 questions per section right, but if you do it this way, you won't have enough time to get to the other 4 questions per section.

But I'm just speaking from my own experience, as someone who only self-prepped. Is there anyone out there who got a gigantic score and found taking a course useful?




I would argue that that TM and PS are both focused on students looking to break into the 99th percentile.  That's one reason they generally require 99th percentile scores, and have a far more in-depth approach.

(You shouldn't be diagramming on most LR Q's on test day -- it should become mostly intuitive by then.) 

I will also note that you could skip (guess on) all the parallel reasoning questions and still break 172. 

Kitty782

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Re: Kaplan?
« Reply #9 on: August 05, 2007, 01:23:23 PM »
I guess the percentile scores are different in DC.  I was told you have to be at least 95th percentile to teach a class, but I understand the DC market is competitive for stuff like this.

Like I said, Kaplan worked great for me. I learn much better in a classroom environment than self teaching.  I don't have any experience with any other test prep classes, so i can't speak to them, but everyone that I know that has taken Kaplan has been quite satisfied with their results. 

As far as other people who have complained, I think the general rule is that people who are upset about something are going to be much more vocal and outspoken than people who are satisfied.
Fordham 2010