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Author Topic: So I took the advice of this board...  (Read 1840 times)

CCH

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So I took the advice of this board...
« on: July 30, 2007, 06:31:16 PM »
well from some of you on this board, and read Law School Confidential. It strongly suggests briefing a case by just highlighting each component of the case (facts, holding etc.)in a different color in the casebook... therefore you save time by not re-writing it when it is all right there AND you just go right to the outlining. Has anyone tried this? Did it work for you?

Thanks in advance.

Booyakasha2

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Re: So I took the advice of this board...
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2007, 06:37:01 PM »
i have yet to try it...still a 0L, but ive never been very adept to using highlighters in my notes.  I don't plan on using this method.
Princeton Law 2010

CCH

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Re: So I took the advice of this board...
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2007, 06:42:58 PM »
Yeah... it seems like it would save time but might be a little confusing to not have a brief written out to-the-point in front of you and in your own words.

ilsox7

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Re: So I took the advice of this board...
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2007, 07:02:03 PM »
This is how I briefed cases (when I used to brief during first semester of 1L).  It's not a bad way to separate things out in this case, but if you have a professor who will want detailed facts and analysis from the case, then it will simply look like you are reading parts of the case back to him. 

I found that when you knew you'd be on call or knew a case was important, it's best to read the case first without doing anything.  Then go back and read it again with the highlighters.  Then go back and read it again making notes in the margins or in your reading notes.  Going through the case 3 times should allow you a pretty good understanding and the different colors will be a rather quick reference in case you are stumped on something simple like the facts of the case.

ANBUDOM

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Re: So I took the advice of this board...
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2007, 08:04:13 PM »
oh man i had so much fun poking fun at ppl who used multi-highlighting. 

I usually briefed cases by typing out a 2 sentence summary of the facts, 1-2 sentences for the rule, another 1-2 sentences for the reasoning, then 5 words for the holding.  I liked typing my stuff out and saving it because you can quickly refer to it during class if you're getting grilled and when outline time comes you can have all your rules and stuff at your fingertips.  I know students that simply put notes in their book without typing anything out and did just fine.  do whatever is most comfortable for you and don't let any one a-hole tell you what is the right or wrong way to do things. 

oh but briefing cases while watching x-files or playing computer games isn't a good idea... i can tell you that much...
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almostlegal

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Re: So I took the advice of this board...
« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2007, 08:23:37 PM »
My husband used the highlighting method from Law School Confidential.  He graduated number one in his class.  He swears by it.

Of course, individuals vary greatly, and no method is great for everyone.  Try it (if you are so inclined), if it works for you, great--if it doesn't, than do something else.

HippieLawChick

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Re: So I took the advice of this board...
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2007, 03:38:09 PM »
almostlegal: he graduated #1 in his class?  From what school? 

I did the highlighting method when I didn't have time to do much else.  I think that those who find a system that works well for them early on end up doing better than those who have to experiment.

ajlrf03

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Re: So I took the advice of this board...
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2007, 01:56:07 PM »
I tried it on my orientation cases, and I actually really liked it. I ended up getting one of those 8 packs of sharpie highlighters, so I changed the color scheme around. I like that I can just flip the page and say, "Oh, there's the holding" or whatever, especially a week or so after I've done the reading.

One thing that was beneficial for me was that I had looked up the case in my commerical outlines/online before I read the case. This gave me clues on what I was looking for so I could understand the case more thoroughly.  Then I read the case once through, then did the highlighting.  I feel like this method allows me to understand the case...the highlighting is just helpful to jog my memory.  I don't want to get caught in a socratic method duel with the professor and just completely blank.

Although, it'd be wise to just do things however they work for you. Just a few ideas on what seems to be helping me.  Granted, I don't have any grades yet to see if it actually works.
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big - fat - box

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Re: So I took the advice of this board...
« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2007, 02:41:41 PM »
All that work you will spend on multicolored highlighting is a waste.

Law school is about exams not briefing cases, it's about analyzing fact patterns on exams.

A quick summary of the facts and rule is all you need from each case.

Come back after grades come in and you'll see what I mean.

ilsox7

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Re: So I took the advice of this board...
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2007, 04:54:20 PM »
All that work you will spend on multicolored highlighting is a waste.

Law school is about exams not briefing cases, it's about analyzing fact patterns on exams.

A quick summary of the facts and rule is all you need from each case.

Come back after grades come in and you'll see what I mean.

M'eh, it depends.  Everyone has their own preferences.