Law School Discussion

FCUK! CANNOT FOCUS!

firewalker

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Re: FCUK! CANNOT FOCUS!
« Reply #30 on: July 24, 2007, 09:20:46 PM »
Fear is a powerful motivator. 


Correction -- fear is a horrible motivator. 

Inspiration is the best motivator.

 ::)



No one who does things out of fear does as well as they could if motivated by positive motivations.  People in fear tend to cramp up, be resentful, and generally do no more than they absolutely have to.

Slaves, whether in ancient greece, the american south or the soviet union, were never known for being particularly productive.  Free agents motivated by wealth, power and glory tend to accomplish far more.


Depends on the individual.  Here's how I see it:

The fear of ending up at some TTT and the shame of explaining it to my peers vs. the "inspiration" of ending up in some cubicle 12 hours a day, bleary eyed.

 

Jedi Master

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Re: FCUK! CANNOT FOCUS!
« Reply #31 on: July 24, 2007, 09:37:02 PM »
This thread has gotten far too philosophical. I say we focus on the real issues: crippling fear and penis size.


Or, on the other hand, crippling penis size. 

I can barely get off my couch.   :(

Size matters not. Look at me. Judge me by my penis size, do you? Hmm? Hmm. And well you should not. For my ally is the hand, and a powerful ally it is. Pleasure creates it, makes it grow. You must feel the hand around you; here, between you, me, the tree, the rock, everywhere, yes. Even between the cheeks and the crack.

Jedi Master

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Re: FCUK! CANNOT FOCUS!
« Reply #32 on: July 24, 2007, 09:41:23 PM »
I agree with everything that's been posted. I just took a "break" from going through a practice test because I just couldn't focus at all. I did really well on the two sections that I got through, but I took about 50 minutes per section because my mind just couldn't concentrate on the task at hand.

Fear definitely is a highly motivating factor for me - at one moment I've come to grips with "settling" with my current score, and the next I'm afraid that at whatever school I may end up with my current score, my job prospects, prestige, ego, career path, penis size, etc., may all suffer.

Inspiration is great, but it also is very easy to be inspired and then turn around and do nothing. I get inspired all the time to get off the couch and study - but that doesn't mean that inspiration will last long enough for me to travel from the couch to the desk without getting distracted by something far more entertaining than the prospect of more LSAT stuff.

In short, I'm afraid.


Fear is the path to the darkside.
Fear leads to anger.
Anger leads to hate.
Hate leads to suffering.


SJ101

Re: FCUK! CANNOT FOCUS!
« Reply #33 on: July 24, 2007, 10:58:02 PM »

I'm afraid that 
my
penis size,
short,
I'm afraid.


Say no more.  I cracked the code...

Yeah, there's your "really logical person." Right there.


There are none so blind as those who will not see...

"He seemed therefore confident, that instead of Reason, we were only possessed of some Quality fitted to increase our natural Vices; as the Reflection from a troubled Stream returns the Image of an ill-shapen Body, not only larger, but more distorted."

Enough. Please.

There is nothing good or bad, but thinking makes it so. Can't we all just agree on that?



So intolerance isn't bad?  Or the guy who inspired hitler?

Fascism is actually a form of militant nationalism. That Nietzsche's writings were cherry-picked and misinterpreted to support its ideas is unfortunate, especially since the concepts of race and state, and the blending of the two that nationalism represents, are entirely antithetical to the more Enlightenment-rooted, and fundamentally individualized,  philosophy that Nietzsche expounded.

Furthermore, the line "there is nothing good or bad, but thinking makes it so" is from act II of Hamlet, and honestly I don't see how this is too controversial - in fact, all its saying, I think, is that if you are looking or some sort of external, metaphysical validation for your own moral beliefs, you are doomed to a life of frustration and confusion. Ultimately, good and bad are subjective concepts. Nietzsche simply argued that the ubermensch (or Over Man) would be able to overcome the knowledge of the underlying arbitrariness of such concepts by accepting their arbitrariness, and in the process no longer be afraid to use his willpower to overcome fear, and become something entirely new.

Interestingly, Nietzsche never said what this new sort of person would be. Probably because he did not know. Most of what we know about his conceptualization of the Over Man comes from the contrast that is drawn in Thus Spake Zarathustra with the so-called Last Man.

Now, Nietzsche's idea is certainly open to criticism. Probably the best critique I've encountered of the ubermensch is in the character of Judge Holden, in Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian. Holden is certainly not a Nazi, but he is the most horrifying villain in American literature nonetheless.

Although Nietzsche's philosophy is forever doomed to be linked with fascism, as I said the link is unfortunate, because I, like most people who actually have taken the time to figure out what he is saying, just can not see how you can say 'this leads to fascism' in any intellectually honest way. EDIT: While it is true that the journey from relativism to nationalism is fairly short, as I've tried to make clear, relativism is a lot older than Nietzsche (think Hobbes, for instance), and it's not really what he was talking about anyway.

EDIT: interestingly, the two reasons that a link between Nietzsche and Nazism is so often assumed have very little to do with Nietzsche's writings. His sister was the big problem - she was a Nazi, and edited and wrote introductions to a number of his texts after his death that radically changed their meaning. Another problem was translation: the predominant English translations of his writings for the first half of the 20th century were written by one Thomas Common, and they were really, really bad. In fact, you can probably blame Common for introducing the term "Superman," which came to be associated with Nazis and is a total basterdization of the German ubermensch , into the pop culture lexicon.

PNym

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Re: FCUK! CANNOT FOCUS!
« Reply #34 on: July 24, 2007, 11:28:24 PM »

Fascism is actually a form of militant nationalism. That Nietzsche's writings were cherry-picked and misinterpreted to support its ideas is unfortunate, especially since the concepts of race and state, and the blending of the two that nationalism represents, are entirely antithetical to the more Enlightenment-rooted, and fundamentally individualized,  philosophy that Nietzsche expounded.

Furthermore, the line "there is nothing good or bad, but thinking makes it so" is from act II of Hamlet, and honestly I don't see how this is too controversial - in fact, all its saying, I think, is that if you are looking or some sort of external, metaphysical validation for your own moral beliefs, you are doomed to a life of frustration and confusion. Ultimately, good and bad are subjective concepts. Nietzsche simply argued that the ubermensch (or Over Man) would be able to overcome the knowledge of the underlying arbitrariness of such concepts by accepting their arbitrariness, and in the process no longer be afraid to use his willpower to overcome fear, and become something entirely new.

Interestingly, Nietzsche never said what this new sort of person would be. Probably because he did not know. Most of what we know about his conceptualization of the Over Man comes from the contrast that is drawn in Thus Spake Zarathustra with the so-called Last Man.

Now, Nietzsche's idea is certainly open to criticism. Probably the best critique I've encountered of the ubermensch is in the character of Judge Holden, in Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian. Holden is certainly not a Nazi, but he is the most horrifying villain in American literature nonetheless.

Although Nietzsche's philosophy is forever doomed to be linked with fascism, as I said the link is unfortunate, because I, like most people who actually have taken the time to figure out what he is saying, just can not see how you can say 'this leads to fascism' in any intellectually honest way. EDIT: While it is true that the journey from relativism to nationalism is fairly short, as I've tried to make clear, relativism is a lot older than Nietzsche (think Hobbes, for instance), and it's not really what he was talking about anyway.

EDIT: interestingly, the two reasons that a link between Nietzsche and Nazism is so often assumed have very little to do with Nietzsche's writings. His sister was the big problem - she was a Nazi, and edited and wrote introductions to a number of his texts after his death that radically changed their meaning. Another problem was translation: the predominant English translations of his writings for the first half of the 20th century were written by one Thomas Common, and they were really, really bad. In fact, you can probably blame Common for introducing the term "Superman," which came to be associated with Nazis and is a total basterdization of the German ubermensch , into the pop culture lexicon.

"For it is most true that Cicero saith of them somewhere; that there can be nothing so absurd but may be found in the books of philosophers."

- Thomas Hobbes, paraphrasing Cicero

Re: FCUK! CANNOT FOCUS!
« Reply #35 on: July 24, 2007, 11:47:37 PM »
I'm pretty sure Nietzsche was talking about Christopher Reeve in Thus Spoke Zarathustra. Talk about being prescient.

Jedi Master made me laugh. Gold star.

Re: FCUK! CANNOT FOCUS!
« Reply #36 on: July 24, 2007, 11:48:14 PM »
"A man cannot be comfortable without his own approval."

"I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it."

-mark twain

SJ101

Re: FCUK! CANNOT FOCUS!
« Reply #37 on: July 25, 2007, 12:48:39 AM »

I'm afraid that 
my
penis size,
short,
I'm afraid.


Say no more.  I cracked the code...

Yeah, there's your "really logical person." Right there.


There are none so blind as those who will not see...

"He seemed therefore confident, that instead of Reason, we were only possessed of some Quality fitted to increase our natural Vices; as the Reflection from a troubled Stream returns the Image of an ill-shapen Body, not only larger, but more distorted."

Enough. Please.

There is nothing good or bad, but thinking makes it so. Can't we all just agree on that?



So intolerance isn't bad?  Or the guy who inspired hitler?

Fascism is actually a form of militant nationalism. That Nietzsche's writings were cherry-picked and misinterpreted to support its ideas is unfortunate, especially since the concepts of race and state, and the blending of the two that nationalism represents, are entirely antithetical to the more Enlightenment-rooted, and fundamentally individualized,  philosophy that Nietzsche expounded.

Furthermore, the line "there is nothing good or bad, but thinking makes it so" is from act II of Hamlet, and honestly I don't see how this is too controversial - in fact, all its saying, I think, is that if you are looking or some sort of external, metaphysical validation for your own moral beliefs, you are doomed to a life of frustration and confusion. Ultimately, good and bad are subjective concepts. Nietzsche simply argued that the ubermensch (or Over Man) would be able to overcome the knowledge of the underlying arbitrariness of such concepts by accepting their arbitrariness, and in the process no longer be afraid to use his willpower to overcome fear, and become something entirely new.

Interestingly, Nietzsche never said what this new sort of person would be. Probably because he did not know. Most of what we know about his conceptualization of the Over Man comes from the contrast that is drawn in Thus Spake Zarathustra with the so-called Last Man.

Now, Nietzsche's idea is certainly open to criticism. Probably the best critique I've encountered of the ubermensch is in the character of Judge Holden, in Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian. Holden is certainly not a Nazi, but he is the most horrifying villain in American literature nonetheless.

Although Nietzsche's philosophy is forever doomed to be linked with fascism, as I said the link is unfortunate, because I, like most people who actually have taken the time to figure out what he is saying, just can not see how you can say 'this leads to fascism' in any intellectually honest way. EDIT: While it is true that the journey from relativism to nationalism is fairly short, as I've tried to make clear, relativism is a lot older than Nietzsche (think Hobbes, for instance), and it's not really what he was talking about anyway.

EDIT: interestingly, the two reasons that a link between Nietzsche and Nazism is so often assumed have very little to do with Nietzsche's writings. His sister was the big problem - she was a Nazi, and edited and wrote introductions to a number of his texts after his death that radically changed their meaning. Another problem was translation: the predominant English translations of his writings for the first half of the 20th century were written by one Thomas Common, and they were really, really bad. In fact, you can probably blame Common for introducing the term "Superman," which came to be associated with Nazis and is a total basterdization of the German ubermensch , into the pop culture lexicon.

I also don't think it's really that difficult to tie Nietzsche to fascism, given certain principles in his writings, and the abandonment of traditional morality, but you're certainly entitled to your opinion. 


When Nietzsche said "God is dead," he wasn't trying to kill him. To his way of thinking, he was simply stating the obvious. In other words, "traditional morality," which is linked to religious principles that were, to his way of thinking, unadaptable to the modern world, was already gone. Personally, I have an easier time seeing fascism as one of humanity's attempts to deal with what could rightly be termed a moral void that the departure of religion created. Nietzsche's Over Man was another way. In other words, I see concurrent development, not a case of one leading to another.

Also, nietzschean philosophy is not so morally relativistic as it might first appear. Theoretically, the Over Man's belief in his right to impose morality would be strong enough that, to him, morality would be essentially objective, or at least more so than the alternatives, which Nietzsche viewed as futile attempts to preserve draconian metaphysical principles.

Hank Rearden

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Re: FCUK! CANNOT FOCUS!
« Reply #38 on: July 25, 2007, 12:51:43 AM »
I don't see how any of this is making it easier for poor Hizzla Pimp to focus. 

Re: FCUK! CANNOT FOCUS!
« Reply #39 on: July 25, 2007, 12:53:41 AM »
If you are looking for motivation look no further then :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ny4YpBgq_Pk&mode=related&search=