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Author Topic: Intellectual Property  (Read 2734 times)

ofchoudhury

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Intellectual Property
« on: July 24, 2007, 12:03:39 AM »
This thread is for anyone who wishes to study Intellectual Property. Talk about what school you want to go to, rankings, reviews, compare universities, discuss your thoughts on the field, post helpful links for others, anything. Just a place to meet new people like you who share the same interests.

BeachBoy

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Re: Intellectual Property
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2007, 10:54:22 PM »
Don't let the "hotness" of the IP field fool you, if you go to a non T-14 school, you still need to finish at the top of your class.

Denny Crane

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Re: Intellectual Property
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2007, 12:30:07 AM »
Law firms are increasingly examining the feasibility of paying their IP law associates higher salaries than non-IP associates in order to better attract those with relevant backgrounds in IP-related fields (science/engineering/etc).
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Re: Intellectual Property
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2007, 03:46:52 AM »
I am on the non-science side of IP.

I love copyright law and how it relates to the music industry. In my fantasy would I would find a job in Entertianment Law and get to dip into IP from time to time.

PS: I was a Recording Industry major... Copyright Law was a required course for us.  ;D
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MahlerGrooves

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Re: Intellectual Property
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2007, 09:44:13 AM »
Law firms are increasingly examining the feasibility of paying their IP law associates higher salaries than non-IP associates in order to better attract those with relevant backgrounds in IP-related fields (science/engineering/etc).

I hope they'll think of doing this on the OTHER side of IP.  I'm completing my graduate degree in musicology and hope to use the skills I've learned (analytic techniques, comparative analysis, etc) to work on the cases of composers/artists in litigation over people stealing their music (in the Avril Levine case, both sides are paying big bucks to hire musicologists as experts).

middlelanguage

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Re: Intellectual Property
« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2007, 05:10:48 PM »
Law firms are increasingly examining the feasibility of paying their IP law associates higher salaries than non-IP associates in order to better attract those with relevant backgrounds in IP-related fields (science/engineering/etc).

I hope they'll think of doing this on the OTHER side of IP.  I'm completing my graduate degree in musicology and hope to use the skills I've learned (analytic techniques, comparative analysis, etc) to work on the cases of composers/artists in litigation over people stealing their music (in the Avril Levine case, both sides are paying big bucks to hire musicologists as experts).

I'm not trying to denigrate your optimism, but completing your musicology degree will not increase your chances of getting a job as a lawyer. Maybe you can be a music expert, but very few cases actually go to trial, and even fewer involve music experts. So, even if you become an *expert*, your chances of working on high profile cases are low. If you want to do soft-IP, trademark typically has a larger practical application.

Denny Crane

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Re: Intellectual Property
« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2007, 05:26:58 PM »
Law firms are increasingly examining the feasibility of paying their IP law associates higher salaries than non-IP associates in order to better attract those with relevant backgrounds in IP-related fields (science/engineering/etc).

I hope they'll think of doing this on the OTHER side of IP.  I'm completing my graduate degree in musicology and hope to use the skills I've learned (analytic techniques, comparative analysis, etc) to work on the cases of composers/artists in litigation over people stealing their music (in the Avril Levine case, both sides are paying big bucks to hire musicologists as experts).

I'm not trying to denigrate your optimism, but completing your musicology degree will not increase your chances of getting a job as a lawyer. Maybe you can be a music expert, but very few cases actually go to trial, and even fewer involve music experts. So, even if you become an *expert*, your chances of working on high profile cases are low. If you want to do soft-IP, trademark typically has a larger practical application.

I think musicology would help him with a career in the music industry, even as a lawyer, which is where I think Grooves was going with his post.
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MahlerGrooves

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Re: Intellectual Property
« Reply #7 on: July 29, 2007, 06:08:23 PM »
Law firms are increasingly examining the feasibility of paying their IP law associates higher salaries than non-IP associates in order to better attract those with relevant backgrounds in IP-related fields (science/engineering/etc).

I hope they'll think of doing this on the OTHER side of IP.  I'm completing my graduate degree in musicology and hope to use the skills I've learned (analytic techniques, comparative analysis, etc) to work on the cases of composers/artists in litigation over people stealing their music (in the Avril Levine case, both sides are paying big bucks to hire musicologists as experts).

I'm not trying to denigrate your optimism, but completing your musicology degree will not increase your chances of getting a job as a lawyer. Maybe you can be a music expert, but very few cases actually go to trial, and even fewer involve music experts. So, even if you become an *expert*, your chances of working on high profile cases are low. If you want to do soft-IP, trademark typically has a larger practical application.

I think musicology would help him with a career in the music industry, even as a lawyer, which is where I think Grooves was going with his post.

Indeed, it is.  I figured that by having both skill sets, I would be more attractive than hiring two separate people, each with only one.  Plus, it makes a great "why I am switching to Law" aspect for my PS  ;)

middlelanguage

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Re: Intellectual Property
« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2007, 06:45:42 PM »
Agreed, it will give you fodder for your personal statement, and it probably won't hurt your marketability--then again, it probably won't increase it that much. Analysis of musical compositions is done by experts. Typically, the firm you work for will need an expert opinion that is not from its own attorney.

MahlerGrooves

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Re: Intellectual Property
« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2007, 09:56:23 PM »
Agreed, it will give you fodder for your personal statement, and it probably won't hurt your marketability--then again, it probably won't increase it that much. Analysis of musical compositions is done by experts. Typically, the firm you work for will need an expert opinion that is not from its own attorney.

Oh I am sure that it won't help all too much in the marketplace, but it could help my PS and help get me into a better school which WOULD help my marketability...  Plus, I am not 100% sure I want to do IP - I won;t make THAT kind of decision until I take classes and decide what area of law I like best.  Plus, I am thinking of doing a JD/PhD in musicology just to "finish what I started" in my masters.