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« on: July 23, 2007, 01:20:29 AM »
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dashrashi

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Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2007, 09:04:57 AM »
The answer is basically no. Looking back on it, the only difference it made was that i sort of had to get applications ready on the basis of what i thought I was going to get.
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Lindbergh

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Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2007, 09:31:07 AM »
I'd say June is a little better, but only slightly.  The earlier you get your app in, the better, and even if they don't look at it until October, they'll probably look at the first apps in first.

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Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2007, 12:42:16 PM »
I tell my students that the biggest disadvantage to switching to Sept./Oct. is that you will definitely hurt yourself if you end up cancelling/screwing up the test and having to sit for Dec.  Otherwise the earliest I've heard of them going through apps is late, late Oct. for most top 15 schools.  Now there are also some minor issues as well, but I could write a book on this stuff and I really don't like typing.

rtqw

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Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2007, 02:25:48 PM »

I'd say it hurts you, but only slightly.  The earlier you get your app in, the better, and even if they don't look at it until October, they'll probably look at the first apps in first.

Do you have any evidence to suggest this is really the case, even if only slightly?

The fact that there is a vast advantage in applying in September (as an aside, I suspect a large portion of June test takers aren't complete in September) as opposed to February does not imply that such an advantage, albeit small, still exists when it comes to September vs. October.

I would be careful to not equate having your app looked at first to having your app decided on first. If you're remotely borderline, your September application probably won't be decided on until later, after the October, November, etc, applications are in too.
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Lindbergh

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Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2007, 02:27:40 PM »
It's better to take the September LSAT well-prepared than to take the June just to gain like, two weeks, because of rolling admissions.  Like a billion times better.  Because those couple of weeks will probably give you no benefit whatsoever.  Adcomms won't even look at your application for a bit once it arrives. 

But not all ED deadlines will accept the September LSAT, even if their deadline is after September 29th; if you plan on applying somewhere early, check with the school.


I'll definitely agree with your first point.  Always better to be fully prepared.  On the other hand, with averaging less of an issue, you could potentially take it both times if you felt prepared in June.

However, your last point makes clear that there is in fact a benefit to applying with a June score -- you're assured of being able to apply early.  Also, it's possible that apps are looked at in order of arrival, even if the adcoms don't begin review until October.

Finally, I'll simply note that the June LSAT is after noon, while the September LSAT is in the morning.  This may be a factor for non-morning people.

Lindbergh

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Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2007, 02:32:30 PM »

I'd say it hurts you, but only slightly.  The earlier you get your app in, the better, and even if they don't look at it until October, they'll probably look at the first apps in first.

Do you have any evidence to suggest this is really the case, even if only slightly?

The fact that there is a vast advantage in applying in September (as an aside, I suspect a large portion of June test takers aren't complete in September) as opposed to February does not imply that such an advantage, albeit small, still exists when it comes to September vs. October.


Why not? 

Early apps show that you really are eager to attend thae school.  If you actualy apply ED, that obviously give you an advantage, but applying as early as possible is probably good form generally, and (presumably) can only help. 

Also, of course, the class is wide-open at the very beginning.  If you have strong numbers for the program, the earlier you apply, the better your chances of being an auto-admit.

If you're borderline, it may not help much, aside from the warm fuzzy fact you applied very early, but even that might help tip the scales.

Again, not saying Sept vs. October is a huge asset, but it probably won't hurt. 

brand_182

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Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2007, 03:14:07 PM »
Would it not be worth it to take the June test so you also have the opportunity to take the Sept/Oct test if you don't meet your own expectations?  I will be studying my ass off for the June test and know I could study more for the Sept/Oct one but feel that the extra weeks of study aren't worth missing out on basically the only "retake" for those of us that want to apply earlier. 
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rtqw

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Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2007, 03:29:14 PM »
Why not? 

Early apps show that you really are eager to attend thae school.  If you actualy apply ED, that obviously give you an advantage, but applying as early as possible is probably good form generally, and (presumably) can only help.

ED applications show that you are eager to attend their school because you have committed, in writing, to attend their school over all others if admitted. The same logic doesn't apply for early applications. I applied to my sixteenth choice the same week as my first choice. The main delays in applications are usually LSAT scores (see this thread), LORs, and things of that sort, which don't speak to one's enthusiasm of the school.

At any rate, whatever enthusiasm that can be gleamed from a September application that couldn't from an October application would be too minimal to make a difference.

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Also, of course, the class is wide-open at the very beginning.  If you have strong numbers for the program, the earlier you apply, the better your chances of being an auto-admit.

The class is never wide-open. These decisions aren't being made in a vacuum. That September application is being considered in the context of a) prior admissions cycles, b) the assumption that applicants may be getting stronger. There's also the rest of the application pool - if a school doesn't start making decisions until November, then they, at the very least, know the LSAT/GPA profile of their entire application pool up to that point, which includes those October applications.

I don't see how a September application would be an auto-admit and an equally strong October application would be a non-admit, unless the school made decisions starting in September and the school was quite incompetent in predicting their application pool.

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Again, not saying Sept vs. October is a huge asset, but it probably won't hurt. 

I don't think it would hurt either, but I reject the idea there is any appreciable advantage. I think we are extending conventional wisdom about the applications process to an inappropriate extreme.
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rtqw

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Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2007, 04:15:43 PM »

ED applications show that you are eager to attend their school because you have committed, in writing, to attend their school over all others if admitted. The same logic doesn't apply for early applications. I applied to my sixteenth choice the same week as my first choice. The main delays in applications are usually LSAT scores (see this thread), LORs, and things of that sort, which don't speak to one's enthusiasm of the school.

At the risk of sounding completely ignorant, you mention that there are Early Deadline apps and early apps. I was under the impression that they were the same thing. Is that a general rule of thumb that you have to commit in writing to the school that you will attend if admitted for ED apps? And if thats the case, does that mean that you can only apply to one school ED?

That's correct. Early Decision programs are separate from simply applying early in the cycle. ED programs require you to complete your application, usually by November 1 or November 15, commit to attend the school if admitted, and you'll get a decision by a certain date (December or January, usually).

(for the record, I don't believe that ED applications give you a huge advantage either, especially considering what you give up, but that's a discussion for a whole other thread)

Schools also have Early Action programs, which don't require you to commit to attend the school, but will get back to you early. Also, a regular 'early application', not under any sort of program, will often receive a decision relatively quickly.
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