Law School Discussion

.

.
« on: July 22, 2007, 11:20:29 PM »
.

Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2007, 07:04:57 AM »
The answer is basically no. Looking back on it, the only difference it made was that i sort of had to get applications ready on the basis of what i thought I was going to get.

rtqw

  • ****
  • 1354
  • Jim Tressel drinks wine coolers
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2007, 12:25:48 PM »

I'd say it hurts you, but only slightly.  The earlier you get your app in, the better, and even if they don't look at it until October, they'll probably look at the first apps in first.

Do you have any evidence to suggest this is really the case, even if only slightly?

The fact that there is a vast advantage in applying in September (as an aside, I suspect a large portion of June test takers aren't complete in September) as opposed to February does not imply that such an advantage, albeit small, still exists when it comes to September vs. October.

I would be careful to not equate having your app looked at first to having your app decided on first. If you're remotely borderline, your September application probably won't be decided on until later, after the October, November, etc, applications are in too.

Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2007, 01:14:07 PM »
Would it not be worth it to take the June test so you also have the opportunity to take the Sept/Oct test if you don't meet your own expectations?  I will be studying my ass off for the June test and know I could study more for the Sept/Oct one but feel that the extra weeks of study aren't worth missing out on basically the only "retake" for those of us that want to apply earlier. 

rtqw

  • ****
  • 1354
  • Jim Tressel drinks wine coolers
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2007, 01:29:14 PM »
Why not? 

Early apps show that you really are eager to attend thae school.  If you actualy apply ED, that obviously give you an advantage, but applying as early as possible is probably good form generally, and (presumably) can only help.

ED applications show that you are eager to attend their school because you have committed, in writing, to attend their school over all others if admitted. The same logic doesn't apply for early applications. I applied to my sixteenth choice the same week as my first choice. The main delays in applications are usually LSAT scores (see this thread), LORs, and things of that sort, which don't speak to one's enthusiasm of the school.

At any rate, whatever enthusiasm that can be gleamed from a September application that couldn't from an October application would be too minimal to make a difference.

Quote
Also, of course, the class is wide-open at the very beginning.  If you have strong numbers for the program, the earlier you apply, the better your chances of being an auto-admit.

The class is never wide-open. These decisions aren't being made in a vacuum. That September application is being considered in the context of a) prior admissions cycles, b) the assumption that applicants may be getting stronger. There's also the rest of the application pool - if a school doesn't start making decisions until November, then they, at the very least, know the LSAT/GPA profile of their entire application pool up to that point, which includes those October applications.

I don't see how a September application would be an auto-admit and an equally strong October application would be a non-admit, unless the school made decisions starting in September and the school was quite incompetent in predicting their application pool.

Quote
Again, not saying Sept vs. October is a huge asset, but it probably won't hurt. 

I don't think it would hurt either, but I reject the idea there is any appreciable advantage. I think we are extending conventional wisdom about the applications process to an inappropriate extreme.

rtqw

  • ****
  • 1354
  • Jim Tressel drinks wine coolers
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2007, 02:15:43 PM »

ED applications show that you are eager to attend their school because you have committed, in writing, to attend their school over all others if admitted. The same logic doesn't apply for early applications. I applied to my sixteenth choice the same week as my first choice. The main delays in applications are usually LSAT scores (see this thread), LORs, and things of that sort, which don't speak to one's enthusiasm of the school.

At the risk of sounding completely ignorant, you mention that there are Early Deadline apps and early apps. I was under the impression that they were the same thing. Is that a general rule of thumb that you have to commit in writing to the school that you will attend if admitted for ED apps? And if thats the case, does that mean that you can only apply to one school ED?

That's correct. Early Decision programs are separate from simply applying early in the cycle. ED programs require you to complete your application, usually by November 1 or November 15, commit to attend the school if admitted, and you'll get a decision by a certain date (December or January, usually).

(for the record, I don't believe that ED applications give you a huge advantage either, especially considering what you give up, but that's a discussion for a whole other thread)

Schools also have Early Action programs, which don't require you to commit to attend the school, but will get back to you early. Also, a regular 'early application', not under any sort of program, will often receive a decision relatively quickly.

Julie Fern

  • *****
  • 25797
  • hillary clinton say "boo!"
    • View Profile
Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2007, 04:32:27 PM »
june hot, september not.

that is all.

Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2007, 08:29:32 PM »
Okey dokey, so the Harvard admission cycle last fall was picked over incessantly in the Harvard Phone Interview thread, and what we noticed was that turnaround time for the very earliest applicants was much much longer than for those who applied a few weeks later. Turnaround time for the September apps was something like sixish weeks. I applied late November, and the turnaround time was three weeks. Schools wait a bit before admitting people. There was no noticeable difference between those who applied September 1 and those who applied November 1 except that those who applied later heard relatively sooner.

Food for thought.

rtqw

  • ****
  • 1354
  • Jim Tressel drinks wine coolers
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2007, 09:13:35 PM »
I don't think it would hurt either, but I reject the idea there is any appreciable advantage. I think we are extending conventional wisdom about the applications process to an inappropriate extreme.

If you really believe there is no real advantage to being an early bird instead of a late bird I encourage you to sleep in till noon everyday and then try to out compete the people doing the same job you are doing who start working at 8a.m. each day.

I'm talking about applying in September versus applying in October. Applying in October isn't 'late'. If you believe it is late, then you have a very different view of the law school admissions process then the one I've developed this past cycle. If we're talking about September versus February, then I wholeheartedly agree that the 'early bird gets the worm', as LSN and other sources provide evidence to back that up.

Re: are you worse off taking the september lsat than the june lsat?
« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2007, 10:11:50 PM »
june hot, september not.

that is all.

Sometimes the snow comes down in June.

I saw you standing with the wind and the rain in your face
And you were thinking ’bout the wisdom of the leaves and their grace
When the leaves come falling down
In september when the leaves, come falling down

And at night the moon is shining on a clear, cloudless sky
And when the evening shadows fall I’ll be there by your side
When the leaves come falling down
In september when the leaves, come falling down

.....

Woe in september, when the leaves come falling down
Oh when the leaves come falling down
Yeah in september when the leaves come falling down

.....

When the leaves come falling down
In september, when the leaves come falling down

When the leaves come falling down in september, in the rain
When the leaves come falling down



Do you remember the 21st night of september?
Love was changing the minds of pretenders
While chasing the clouds away

Our hearts were ringing
In the key that our souls were singing.
As we danced in the night,
Remember how the stars stole the night away

Ba de ya - say do you remember
Ba de ya - dancing in september
Ba de ya - never was a cloudy day

My thoughts are with you
Holding hands with your heart to see you
Only blue talk and love,
Remember how we knew love was here to stay

Now december found the love that we shared in september.
Only blue talk and love,
Remember the true love we share today

Stephen King was born Sept 21. 9/21 is also Carrie White's birthday in Carrie