Law School Discussion

Possible Consquences about lying that you are a URM?

Re: Possible Consquences about lying that you are a URM?
« Reply #150 on: August 12, 2008, 04:37:11 PM »
I responded on the other thread.  I recently saw that Georgia only rejected something like 50 applicants in the history of c & f.  So yes, virtually everyone passes.  I think the only way you would fail that is if you embezzled money b/c of the trust account concerns.


I seriously doubt lying about URM status would come to light in C & F.  The only way I could see is if they compared college applications (which to my knowledge they don't).

How can you even prove one is or isn't a URM?  What constitutes minority? 1/2? 1/4? 1/128?  There are some serious proof problems here.


bt

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Re: Possible Consquences about lying that you are a URM?
« Reply #151 on: August 12, 2008, 05:03:25 PM »
Something that should be kept in mind if it hasn't been mentioned is that it could be bad if you suddenly switch (I assume).  I can certainly pass for Native American due to my olive skin but I have always identified as white despite the fact that I may (and probably am) 1/8th NA.  Since I have identified as white on my college apps and now on the LSAT when I took it, it would probably do more harm than good if I suddenly took advantage of my possible URM status.

Matthew

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Re: Possible Consquences about lying that you are a URM?
« Reply #152 on: August 12, 2008, 06:54:38 PM »
That's what the entire argument for the last few posts have been.  I never indicated race to my college, and doubt most include it on the transcript.