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Author Topic: Specific Areas of Study  (Read 4868 times)

A.

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Re: Specific Areas of Study
« Reply #20 on: July 17, 2007, 02:39:39 PM »
I'd reiterate what others have said - that law school will open up your eyes to areas of the law you might not even have thought about to this point.  I enjoyed law school - learning the law and studying the law - but really had no clue where I wanted to apply the knowledge until the very end.  I decided I didn't want to push paper at a desk, that I wanted to be in court, and that I wanted to work on compelling cases - the nitty gritty, real life stuff.  So I gravitated toward criminal and family law and now work exclusively in family law. So when people ask you, it's perfectly ok to say, "We'll see..."

And btw, every lawyer works in "constitutional law."  It permeates every area of practice.  For example, in my practice I'm concerned with the fundamental right to parent.  Bear in mind, however, that most of the constitutional issues you'll encounter have already been addressed and codified under the law, e.g. procedural due process is taken care of in the Code of Civil Procedure which provides for certain steps to ensure that opposing party is noticed and has the opportunity to be heard.  Of course, when you say "constitutional law" you probably mean "civil rights," which is simply enforcing personal rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights.  :) 
   

Of course lawyers deal with constitutional law, but how many times have you heard someone call themselves a "constitutional lawyer"?  Very few lawyers do nothing but constitutional law.  And civil rights lawyers enforce more than the Bill of Rights.  Lol, that doesn't even include the 14th Amendment, let alone the Civil Rights Act.

jd06

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Re: Specific Areas of Study
« Reply #21 on: July 17, 2007, 02:47:49 PM »


Of course lawyers deal with constitutional law, but how many times have you heard someone call themselves a "constitutional lawyer"?  Very few lawyers do nothing but constitutional law.  And civil rights lawyers enforce more than the Bill of Rights.  Lol, that doesn't even include the 14th Amendment, let alone the Civil Rights Act.
[/quote]

That was my point.  We're all "constitutional lawyers."  I think when people say they want to practice "constitutional law" they mean "civil rights."  And I was trying to keep "civil rights" simple.  I won't go into the relationship between the 5th and the 14th Amendment, but thanks for the help. lol

Statistic

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Re: Specific Areas of Study
« Reply #22 on: July 17, 2007, 02:49:46 PM »
constitutional scholars - ive heard of those. never a constitutional lawyer tho
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A.

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Re: Specific Areas of Study
« Reply #23 on: July 17, 2007, 02:50:27 PM »
Quote

Of course lawyers deal with constitutional law, but how many times have you heard someone call themselves a "constitutional lawyer"?  Very few lawyers do nothing but constitutional law.  And civil rights lawyers enforce more than the Bill of Rights.  Lol, that doesn't even include the 14th Amendment, let alone the Civil Rights Act.

That was my point.  We're all "constitutional lawyers."  I think when people say they want to practice "constitutional law" they mean "civil rights."  And I was trying to keep "civil rights" simple.  I won't go into the relationship between the 5th and the 14th Amendment, but thanks for the help. lol

Lol yeah, gotta love that 5th Amendment equal protection clause ;)

jd06

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Re: Specific Areas of Study
« Reply #24 on: July 17, 2007, 02:53:43 PM »
Quote

Of course lawyers deal with constitutional law, but how many times have you heard someone call themselves a "constitutional lawyer"?  Very few lawyers do nothing but constitutional law.  And civil rights lawyers enforce more than the Bill of Rights.  Lol, that doesn't even include the 14th Amendment, let alone the Civil Rights Act.

That was my point.  We're all "constitutional lawyers."  I think when people say they want to practice "constitutional law" they mean "civil rights."  And I was trying to keep "civil rights" simple.  I won't go into the relationship between the 5th and the 14th Amendment, but thanks for the help. lol

Lol yeah, gotta love that 5th Amendment equal protection clause ;)

Implied in federal court via the "due process" clause....

A.

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Re: Specific Areas of Study
« Reply #25 on: July 17, 2007, 02:58:23 PM »
Quote

Of course lawyers deal with constitutional law, but how many times have you heard someone call themselves a "constitutional lawyer"?  Very few lawyers do nothing but constitutional law.  And civil rights lawyers enforce more than the Bill of Rights.  Lol, that doesn't even include the 14th Amendment, let alone the Civil Rights Act.

That was my point.  We're all "constitutional lawyers."  I think when people say they want to practice "constitutional law" they mean "civil rights."  And I was trying to keep "civil rights" simple.  I won't go into the relationship between the 5th and the 14th Amendment, but thanks for the help. lol

Lol yeah, gotta love that 5th Amendment equal protection clause ;)

Implied in federal court via the "due process" clause....


Lol which are you saying:
A. The EPC is recognized through the DPC
B. Federal courts can enforce the EPC only through the DPC
C. The EPC is enforceable against the federal government through the 5th Amendment's DPC
D. The EPC is enforceable against the federal government through the 14th Amendment's DPC

jd06

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Re: Specific Areas of Study
« Reply #26 on: July 17, 2007, 03:08:26 PM »
Hmmmmm...Con Law was a while ago but I'd say "none of the above."  I'd go with "federal courts enforce equal protection (NOT "the equal protection clause") via the 5th Amendement due process clause."  That is, there is no EPC, per se, in federal court.  What would you say?   

A.

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Re: Specific Areas of Study
« Reply #27 on: July 17, 2007, 03:12:18 PM »
I'd say C (though you're right that it's not the clause per se), since federal courts don't need the 5thA to enforce the 14thA against states...hence one reason why I'd say a "civil rights lawyer" wouldn't necessarily focus on the Bill of Rights.

jd06

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Re: Specific Areas of Study
« Reply #28 on: July 17, 2007, 03:30:05 PM »
I'd say C (though you're right that it's not the clause per se), since federal courts don't need the 5thA to enforce the 14thA against states...hence one reason why I'd say a "civil rights lawyer" wouldn't necessarily focus on the Bill of Rights.

I'll buy that.  Your answer, sans the EPC, is more specific than mine and therefore better.  I don't practice in civil rights but I'd say these lawyers seek enforcement of certain federal and state legislation (e.g. the Civil Rights Act, the Federal Housing and Employment Act - I think that's what its called, etc.) which is essentially codification of fundamental personal rights grounded in the Bill of Rights.  That is, they're certainly not bringing the action under "the 5th Amendment," etc. 

And my apologies to the OP for somewhat hijacking the thread!     

SKW

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Re: Specific Areas of Study
« Reply #29 on: July 17, 2007, 04:04:27 PM »
And my apologies to the OP for somewhat hijacking the thread!     

Ehh...I'm accustomed to it now...Second time this week (The Hair Thread and now this)  ;)
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