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Black Folks and Religion

7S

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Black Folks and Religion
« on: July 02, 2007, 11:30:37 PM »
Anyone else grow up in a heavly religious household, go to college and then question your beliefs? Religion has always been the supporting structure to help black folk through troubling times (at least thats my perception). However, now I feel like it's crippling.

cui bono?

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Re: Black Folks and Religion
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2007, 03:22:16 AM »
My household wasnt really religious at all.  When I went to UG, I took several courses (almost double-majored) in "other" religions which did make me think about my own.  I think "we", meaning young black profesionals/pre-professionals, have gotten away from it because our minds have been molded to think more "logically" as oppossed to spiritually.  Not a lotta room for faith.   

A.

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Re: Black Folks and Religion
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2007, 05:38:13 AM »
I think it's difficult to separate "religion" from the humans and organizations that influence its doctrine and precepts.  That's why I generally go with the gist and attend churches that have less whooping and hollering and more in-depth examination of the Bible.  That said, whooping and hollering can be quite amusing, as long as you take it for the entertainment that it is.

So my beliefs have changed, but I still think that religion is important for the black community, as it is for all oppressed communities.  And bright-line rules also serve a purpose for those who won't take the time or lack the mental ability (and I mean that nicely) to think through their actions.

Stand under my Umbrella ella ella, aye!!

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Re: Black Folks and Religion
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2007, 05:57:13 AM »
I think it's difficult to separate "religion" from the humans and organizations that influence its doctrine and precepts.  That's why I generally go with the gist and attend churches that have less whooping and hollering and more in-depth examination of the Bible.  That said, whooping and hollering can be quite amusing, as long as you take it for the entertainment that it is.

So my beliefs have changed, but I still think that religion is important for the black community, as it is for all oppressed communities.  And bright-line rules also serve a purpose for those who won't take the time or lack the mental ability (and I mean that nicely) to think through their actions.

WEB Dubois described his experience at a Southern Pentacostal church as "horrifying".  lol.  I cant say he was too far off.  Too many people in one place riled up and not thinking clearly is scary for me too. 

That said, I cant stand Eddie Long and Kreflo Dollar - riling everyone up to dig in their pockets.  I do think there is a place for collective spirituality, and it's energy.  It's a very powerful medium and I think it is real (not the Bible but the energy.  you could get people to worship anything and get this energy).  I just think its being misused and is having deleterious effects. 

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Re: Black Folks and Religion
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2007, 06:24:51 AM »
I think it's difficult to separate "religion" from the humans and organizations that influence its doctrine and precepts.  That's why I generally go with the gist and attend churches that have less whooping and hollering and more in-depth examination of the Bible.  That said, whooping and hollering can be quite amusing, as long as you take it for the entertainment that it is.

So my beliefs have changed, but I still think that religion is important for the black community, as it is for all oppressed communities.  And bright-line rules also serve a purpose for those who won't take the time or lack the mental ability (and I mean that nicely) to think through their actions.

WEB Dubois described his experience at a Southern Pentacostal church as "horrifying".  lol.  I cant say he was too far off.  Too many people in one place riled up and not thinking clearly is scary for me too. 

That said, I cant stand Eddie Long and Kreflo Dollar - riling everyone up to dig in their pockets.  I do think there is a place for collective spirituality, and it's energy.  It's a very powerful medium and I think it is real (not the Bible but the energy.  you could get people to worship anything and get this energy).  I just think its being misused and is having deleterious effects. 

My contention exactly. I believe in the power of God. However, I don't believe Jesus would ever wear gold cufflinks or aligator shoes. I also don't beleive Jesus meant for people to equate heaven with earthly pocessions or for the black church to focus specifically on attaining them. I'm pretty sure that Jesus never intended for the Church to lobby government. AND I'm almost positive that Jesus would not be on BET at 2 AM sending prayer hankerchiefs and olive oil soap as solications for offering.

It seems like the black church does a pretty good job of keeping logic and science out of church doctorine. Does any black preacher read the Bible in context? If homosexuality is a sin why are people still eating pork? And why can't women be preachers?

 :-[ WHY!?!

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Re: Black Folks and Religion
« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2007, 06:29:43 AM »
im not black, but when i do go to church, its more of a way to support and identify with my native...tribe for the lack of a better word, than for any personal belief of an omnipotent being that made all of the universe.

7S

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Re: Black Folks and Religion
« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2007, 07:09:58 AM »
Paul's scripture about homosexuality has been misrepresented. I'm pretty certain he was talking about idolatry. He was wrong about women though-him and Simon Peter.

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Re: Black Folks and Religion
« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2007, 07:16:17 AM »
I think it's difficult to separate "religion" from the humans and organizations that influence its doctrine and precepts.  That's why I generally go with the gist and attend churches that have less whooping and hollering and more in-depth examination of the Bible.  That said, whooping and hollering can be quite amusing, as long as you take it for the entertainment that it is.

So my beliefs have changed, but I still think that religion is important for the black community, as it is for all oppressed communities.  And bright-line rules also serve a purpose for those who won't take the time or lack the mental ability (and I mean that nicely) to think through their actions.

SMH

Lol it is entertainment.  It's a good rhetorical device.  They can turn it on and off at will, depending on how worked up the crowd is.  What do you take it to be?

Re: Black Folks and Religion
« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2007, 07:18:21 AM »
lol @ turning it on and off @ will :D :D :D :D

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Re: Black Folks and Religion
« Reply #9 on: July 03, 2007, 07:28:51 AM »
I think it's difficult to separate "religion" from the humans and organizations that influence its doctrine and precepts.  That's why I generally go with the gist and attend churches that have less whooping and hollering and more in-depth examination of the Bible.  That said, whooping and hollering can be quite amusing, as long as you take it for the entertainment that it is.

So my beliefs have changed, but I still think that religion is important for the black community, as it is for all oppressed communities.  And bright-line rules also serve a purpose for those who won't take the time or lack the mental ability (and I mean that nicely) to think through their actions.

SMH

Lol it is entertainment.  It's a good rhetorical device.  They can turn it on and off at will, depending on how worked up the crowd is.  What do you take it to be?

Who is "they"? Perhaps I'm misunderstanding what you mean by "whooping and hollering." The above sounds like you're referring to theatrics in the pulpit, which I usually can't stand unless the preacher is actually getting in the spirit, instead of "Hmmmming" and "ACKing" and all.

Yeah that's what I meant.  And I also think that being "in the spirit" is mainly just getting caught up in the group energy and dynamics occurring at the time.  So I'm not sure that that justifies whooping as much as it goes along with the whole effect.


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I'm not so sure about this entertainment initiative for congregants, as I know even people with your general personality who occasionally "whoop and holler" at church.

Hm what do you mean?  Are you talking about running down the aisles, dancing, speaking in tongues, etc.?  Lol on that, I'm of the whatever floats your boat camp...but it's pure entertainment for me.  I love watching people do that...to an extent.  Sometimes I just want to hear the singing, get a good sermon, and go home.  I've been to churches that have dedicated times for running up and down the aisles and such...definitely not my cup of tea.