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Author Topic: Thinking/Speaking Like A Pre-Law Student in Everyday Situations  (Read 926 times)

ExpLo

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I once heard a law professor say that lawyers usually have friends who are lawyers because lawyers think differently than nonlawyers in that they analyze something from every possible angle.  They also conversate differently than nonlawyers in that they're very precise with the words that they use in conversation.  Ever since preparing for the LSAT, I find myself starting to think and conversate like a pre-law student in everyday situations.  In conversations, I'll split-hairs on topics and dissect people's word usage (Bill Clinton's "well that depends on what your definition of the word is is").  I make less and less assumptions that would be an acceptable assumption to a normal person.  For example, instead of telling my roommate to go wash the dishes, I tell him to go wash the dishes, glasses, and forks.  I mean, I know damn well he wouldn't wash just the dishes and leave the dirty forks and glasses in the sink if I told him to just wash the dishes, but I just like to be precise.  Do I need a shrink?   ;D   

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Re: Thinking/Speaking Like A Pre-Law Student in Everyday Situations
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2007, 06:13:43 PM »
I once heard a law professor say that lawyers usually have friends who are lawyers because lawyers think differently than nonlawyers in that they analyze something from every possible angle.  They also conversate differently than nonlawyers in that they're very precise with the words that they use in conversation.  Ever since preparing for the LSAT, I find myself starting to think and conversate like a pre-law student in everyday situations.  In conversations, I'll split-hairs on topics and dissect people's word usage (Bill Clinton's "well that depends on what your definition of the word is is").  I make less and less assumptions that would be an acceptable assumption to a normal person.  For example, instead of telling my roommate to go wash the dishes, I tell him to go wash the dishes, glasses, and forks.  I mean, I know damn well he wouldn't wash just the dishes and leave the dirty forks and glasses in the sink if I told him to just wash the dishes, but I just like to be precise.  Do I need a shrink?   ;D   

Yes.

12(e)

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Re: Thinking/Speaking Like A Pre-Law Student in Everyday Situations
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2007, 06:17:00 PM »
yes.

and conversate isn't a word.

 ;)
your stupid                                                 
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lawschoolboundlady

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Re: Thinking/Speaking Like A Pre-Law Student in Everyday Situations
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2007, 06:39:39 PM »
I once heard a law professor say that lawyers usually have friends who are lawyers because lawyers think differently than nonlawyers in that they analyze something from every possible angle.  They also conversate differently than nonlawyers in that they're very precise with the words that they use in conversation.  Ever since preparing for the LSAT, I find myself starting to think and conversate like a pre-law student in everyday situations.  In conversations, I'll split-hairs on topics and dissect people's word usage (Bill Clinton's "well that depends on what your definition of the word is is").  I make less and less assumptions that would be an acceptable assumption to a normal person.  For example, instead of telling my roommate to go wash the dishes, I tell him to go wash the dishes, glasses, and forks.  I mean, I know damn well he wouldn't wash just the dishes and leave the dirty forks and glasses in the sink if I told him to just wash the dishes, but I just like to be precise.  Do I need a shrink?   ;D   

After reading this, I will now only be friends with non-lawyers.

The Poster

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Re: Thinking/Speaking Like A Pre-Law Student in Everyday Situations
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2007, 10:37:37 AM »
yes.

and conversate isn't a word.

 ;)

you came back for THAT!?!?! :D
quote Stanley J. Watson III
you are doomed in the fated sense, but that's completely irrelevant because that's only from the viewpoint of someone who is not constrained by time. since you are temporal, for all intents and purposes you have the power to change your future

Julie Fern

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Re: Thinking/Speaking Like A Pre-Law Student in Everyday Situations
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2007, 10:43:25 AM »
oh my.

lawschoolboundlady

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Re: Thinking/Speaking Like A Pre-Law Student in Everyday Situations
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2007, 11:04:16 AM »
again, all I'm getting out of this thread is to cling to non-law school friends for dear life. Even if it means sacrificing a fraction of my gpa haha

sgtpepper05

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Re: Thinking/Speaking Like A Pre-Law Student in Everyday Situations
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2007, 11:40:00 AM »
choose your own answer:

a) good flame.

b) killself.

n/a

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Re: Thinking/Speaking Like A Pre-Law Student in Everyday Situations
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2007, 01:32:18 PM »
Quote
What the hell is Ice Cube talkin about
That's how you get these here parked in you mouth
Westside ride trick, the same old spit
I don't conversate with chicks I ain't goin hit
I don't holla at these pros that sing like Ashante
Body like Beyonce, face like Andre (uhhh)



If its good enough for Ice Cube and the Westside Connection, its good enough for me

Hank Rearden

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Re: Thinking/Speaking Like A Pre-Law Student in Everyday Situations
« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2007, 02:30:18 PM »
Eh I've always been like this. 
CLS '10

The appropriateness of Perpetua would probably depend on the tone of the writing.  When I used it, I (half playfully) thought the extra space made the words sort of resonate.