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Author Topic: Importance of LSAT  (Read 804 times)

john_kingston

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Importance of LSAT
« on: June 30, 2007, 11:51:28 AM »
let say you are a Rhodes Scholar, Marshall Scholar etc, do you still need a top LSAT score to get a place at top 20 law schools?

AllyS

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Re: Importance of LSAT
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2007, 12:10:44 PM »
let say you are a Rhodes Scholar, Marshall Scholar etc, do you still need a top LSAT score to get a place at top 20 law schools?

Depends on your GPA. If you have a higher GPA, you may be able to get away with a lower LSAT score, but you'll probably still need to be within that schools range.

slacker

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Re: Importance of LSAT
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2007, 04:07:33 PM »
Numbers (LSAT/UGPA) rule.

john_kingston

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Re: Importance of LSAT
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2007, 03:59:59 AM »
all the qualifications in the world + a 163 can get you into uc berkeley and maybe cornell out of the top 14.

otherwise, you'll need at least a 166.
so you'll need at least 163 regardless of what prestigious quealifications you have?

TeresaPinfold

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Re: Importance of LSAT
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2007, 05:08:51 AM »
Unless maybe if your qualification was donating a wing of the school.

owlsmid17

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Re: Importance of LSAT
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2007, 05:09:33 AM »
Quote
so you'll need at least 163 regardless of what prestigious quealifications you have?

So, first off, congrats, as those are some amazing accomplishments. But despite that, law school adcomms are looking at your numbers, almost exclusively, from what I understand. Your great soft factors can come into play when they are looking at offering a spot to you v. another candidate with equal numbers, but echoing what others have said, regardless of what you have achieved, a candidate with a less extensive resume with better numbers will stand a better chance of being admitted. 

As for a set number, it depends on what school in the t14 you choose to target and your GPA; I would suggest checking out LSN for a better idea of your target numbers for a particular school. As you'll be able to see from the graphs, it almost always comes down to the numbers, although there is the rare exception. Best of luck!
"I'm sick of following my dreams. I'm just going to ask them where they're going and hook up with them later."

und3r3stimat3d

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Re: Importance of LSAT
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2007, 02:06:08 PM »
all the qualifications in the world + a 163 can get you into uc berkeley and maybe cornell out of the top 14.

otherwise, you'll need at least a 166.
so you'll need at least 163 regardless of what prestigious quealifications you have?

You have to shake loose this idea that you seem to have that if you are somehow "special" or "different" (as our parents have constantly reminded us our whole lives thanks to the hippie "self-esteem" in parenting movement took hold), you are exempt from the requirements that otherwise apply to everyone else. You are likely not special, I am not, the other posters are not. None of us are in the sense that in all but the very most extreme circumstances, there are rules we have to follow to get what we want. In this case, the rule happens to be that you don't get to go to a top law school without a top LSAT score.

Truth is, the group of people applying to top schools ALL have special qualifications and experiences. So the fact that you would have such things is actually pretty common. Note that I'm not hating on you right here, I'm just trying to help explain why you'll still need a strong LSAT score. I really mean that -- please do not take this as a personal attack, because that's not what it is. I am speaking generally to something I constantly see here on LSD, esp. from new users: the "me me me me! pay attention to me! I am special and different and really qualified so how can I get around the law school application norms that seem so limiting and inconvenient." Anna Ivey talks a lot about this in her blog when she posts about "Gen Y," "helicopter parenting," and the like, and I think she's right. As a generation we're quite precocious, and sometimes it can help a whole lot if we recognize that and try to limit our willingness to indulge the urge to present ourselves as "special."

Best of luck with your applications. Don't be modest about your accomplishments. My sense is you're very proud of them and that you have worked hard to get where you are. But when you look at how far they will carry you, it is best to be honest with yourself and realize that while they may be great tie-breakers (a wonderful asset to have!!), they're no substitute to performing well on the one measuring stick that can be equally applied to every law school applicant: the LSAT.


End of rant.

DCB... this is unrelated but I saw you're a Northwestern 2010. Do you mind if I ask your stats, if you had work experience, and if you did not, if they made you defer a year? Thanks!

und3r3stimat3d

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Re: Importance of LSAT
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2007, 02:06:33 PM »
If you can get Rhodes, I'm assuming you can get a 163 on the measly LSAT.

Refused Party Program

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Re: Importance of LSAT
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2007, 02:13:38 PM »
DCB hit it right on the head. Many of us think our soft factors are "great" when in truth they aren't. I'm even starting to think that URM isn't as big of a boost as it used to be.

A 163 is very low of the top-14. Under those circumstances, I'd bet you would need to be a URM to feel very confident. I think it's still work applying to maybe Cornell, Boalt, maybe Penn and seeing if you can get some waitlist/accept action.

top-25 on the other hand is within reach. GW, Emory, Fordham (maybe), Wash-U, Iowa, Minn, they are all good schools and should be doable.

You could also try Georgetown PT, just don't apply late or for both FT and PT like I did.