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Author Topic: Shortage of Black Men in Law (Dismal)  (Read 12412 times)

Slim

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Re: Shortage of Black Men in Law (Dismal)
« Reply #20 on: June 30, 2007, 04:49:06 PM »
I disagree totally.  I think black ppl apprach the LSAT w/ more discipline, assuming that the test is biased.  So I think we approach it differently-  we have a plan and execute it.  Perhaps some of us are overwhelmed by the bias and decide not to take it.   
I self studied over 3 months.  The reason I didn't start earlier is because I hadn't made up my mind then.  I don't think I needed more than 3 months.  The *&^% ain't rocket science. 

Not to preach but: "For as a man thinketh in his heart so is he" Proverbs 23:7.  If we continue to believe we won't do well on the LSAT, in Law School, on the BAR, and as Lawyers, then we won't.



Enlighten the people, generally, and tyranny and oppressions of body and mind will vanish like spirits at the dawn of day. - Thomas Jefferson.

Special Agent Dana Scully

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Re: Shortage of Black Men in Law (Dismal)
« Reply #21 on: June 30, 2007, 04:50:43 PM »
I disagree totally.  I think black ppl apprach the LSAT w/ more discipline, assuming that the test is biased.  So I think we approach it differently-  we have a plan and execute it.  Perhaps some of us are overwhelmed by the bias and decide not to take it.   

i disagree with this...most of the black ppl i know from ug waiting til the last minute for everything and totally underestimated the test...and these r ivy blk folk who should know better.
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Re: Shortage of Black Men in Law (Dismal)
« Reply #22 on: June 30, 2007, 04:54:12 PM »
There are only a handful of black men besides myself at my undergrad right now, and my school caters to two cities with a huge black population. It's depressing.
Michigan '11

Special Agent Dana Scully

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Re: Shortage of Black Men in Law (Dismal)
« Reply #23 on: June 30, 2007, 05:00:12 PM »
There are only a handful of black men besides myself at my undergrad right now, and my school caters to two cities with a huge black population. It's depressing.

 :(
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Slim

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Re: Shortage of Black Men in Law (Dismal)
« Reply #24 on: June 30, 2007, 05:06:08 PM »
In Philadelphia this past week a  Black Male was shot.  What made this one different was that he had a full Academic Scholarship to (I think) Syracuse... Academic - he was a part of our brain trust.  He died. :'( 
Enlighten the people, generally, and tyranny and oppressions of body and mind will vanish like spirits at the dawn of day. - Thomas Jefferson.

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Shortage of Black Men in Law (Dismal)
« Reply #25 on: June 30, 2007, 09:22:14 PM »


So beyond the race specific issues mentioned by other posters I think there may be a gender specific bias also at play. That gender bias probably plays out less so with white counterparts because they feel a sense of ownership of the law and because they usually have exposure to the real practice of law and know that there is more to the legal field than arguments. They tend to know more about its practical applications in business and academia.



[pausing for a study break]

A lot of good commentary going on in here, but I have to say that TITCR!

Taking a step back from the gender issue and commenting on the general divide between black law school applicants and our white counterparts, we are, by and large, coming from two different universes.  Although I am remiss to make any wide sweeping allegations about anything in life, the law school experience has shown me (and the rest of my fellow law students I imagine) that the playing field is all but equal when it comes to legal education and those who enter into it.  And it goes back much much further than the 2 or 3 months that it takes you to prepare for an LSAT.  I'm talking about the professional parent vocabulary and exposure to other sources of intellectual growth since childhood, coupled with the access card of family legacy.  This is something that brothers and sisters both have in common when it comes to the law school process.

Why this effects brothers more than sisters is a matter of speculation, but I am inclined to agree with what many of you have stated already.  Great comments.  Keep it flowing.
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shaz

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Re: Shortage of Black Men in Law (Dismal)
« Reply #26 on: June 30, 2007, 10:08:03 PM »
In Philadelphia this past week a  Black Male was shot.  What made this one different was that he had a full Academic Scholarship to (I think) Syracuse... Academic - he was a part of our brain trust.  He died. :'( 

Damn...

This is one of the reasons I left for school early last year. Man, I was seeing too much yellow tape around me. It was like someone was saying, "get out of philly."

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Re: Shortage of Black Men in Law (Dismal)
« Reply #27 on: July 02, 2007, 08:25:11 AM »


So beyond the race specific issues mentioned by other posters I think there may be a gender specific bias also at play. That gender bias probably plays out less so with white counterparts because they feel a sense of ownership of the law and because they usually have exposure to the real practice of law and know that there is more to the legal field than arguments. They tend to know more about its practical applications in business and academia.



[pausing for a study break]

A lot of good commentary going on in here, but I have to say that TITCR!

Taking a step back from the gender issue and commenting on the general divide between black law school applicants and our white counterparts, we are, by and large, coming from two different universes.  Although I am remiss to make any wide sweeping allegations about anything in life, the law school experience has shown me (and the rest of my fellow law students I imagine) that the playing field is all but equal when it comes to legal education and those who enter into it.  And it goes back much much further than the 2 or 3 months that it takes you to prepare for an LSAT.  I'm talking about the professional parent vocabulary and exposure to other sources of intellectual growth since childhood, coupled with the access card of family legacy.  This is something that brothers and sisters both have in common when it comes to the law school process.

Why this effects brothers more than sisters is a matter of speculation, but I am inclined to agree with what many of you have stated already.  Great comments.  Keep it flowing.

I think one of the huge reasons why there are less Black males than females in law schools is simply numbers.  Black women are outpacing Black men when pursuing undergrad degrees and therefore have a larger pool of those eligible to pursue a JD.  In order to figure out why there are so few brothers in law school we must first figure out why there are so few brothers in college period. 
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Re: Shortage of Black Men in Law (Dismal)
« Reply #28 on: July 02, 2007, 08:52:49 AM »


So beyond the race specific issues mentioned by other posters I think there may be a gender specific bias also at play. That gender bias probably plays out less so with white counterparts because they feel a sense of ownership of the law and because they usually have exposure to the real practice of law and know that there is more to the legal field than arguments. They tend to know more about its practical applications in business and academia.



[pausing for a study break]

A lot of good commentary going on in here, but I have to say that TITCR!

Taking a step back from the gender issue and commenting on the general divide between black law school applicants and our white counterparts, we are, by and large, coming from two different universes.  Although I am remiss to make any wide sweeping allegations about anything in life, the law school experience has shown me (and the rest of my fellow law students I imagine) that the playing field is all but equal when it comes to legal education and those who enter into it.  And it goes back much much further than the 2 or 3 months that it takes you to prepare for an LSAT.  I'm talking about the professional parent vocabulary and exposure to other sources of intellectual growth since childhood, coupled with the access card of family legacy.  This is something that brothers and sisters both have in common when it comes to the law school process.

Why this effects brothers more than sisters is a matter of speculation, but I am inclined to agree with what many of you have stated already.  Great comments.  Keep it flowing.

I think one of the huge reasons why there are less Black males than females in law schools is simply numbers.  Black women are outpacing Black men when pursuing undergrad degrees and therefore have a larger pool of those eligible to pursue a JD.  In order to figure out why there are so few brothers in law school we must first figure out why there are so few brothers in college period. 

DOH! How'd we forget that one? And we're the people taking the LR sections? LOL

Absolutely. Although some folks say we're losing boys way before high school. The public school system as a whole is failing.
I tested between 151 and 162. I hoped for the high end and ended up in the middle. Still, not a bad plan overall, I think.

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Special Agent Dana Scully

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Re: Shortage of Black Men in Law (Dismal)
« Reply #29 on: July 02, 2007, 09:15:12 AM »


So beyond the race specific issues mentioned by other posters I think there may be a gender specific bias also at play. That gender bias probably plays out less so with white counterparts because they feel a sense of ownership of the law and because they usually have exposure to the real practice of law and know that there is more to the legal field than arguments. They tend to know more about its practical applications in business and academia.



[pausing for a study break]

A lot of good commentary going on in here, but I have to say that TITCR!

Taking a step back from the gender issue and commenting on the general divide between black law school applicants and our white counterparts, we are, by and large, coming from two different universes.  Although I am remiss to make any wide sweeping allegations about anything in life, the law school experience has shown me (and the rest of my fellow law students I imagine) that the playing field is all but equal when it comes to legal education and those who enter into it.  And it goes back much much further than the 2 or 3 months that it takes you to prepare for an LSAT.  I'm talking about the professional parent vocabulary and exposure to other sources of intellectual growth since childhood, coupled with the access card of family legacy.  This is something that brothers and sisters both have in common when it comes to the law school process.

Why this effects brothers more than sisters is a matter of speculation, but I am inclined to agree with what many of you have stated already.  Great comments.  Keep it flowing.

I think one of the huge reasons why there are less Black males than females in law schools is simply numbers.  Black women are outpacing Black men when pursuing undergrad degrees and therefore have a larger pool of those eligible to pursue a JD.  In order to figure out why there are so few brothers in law school we must first figure out why there are so few brothers in college period. 

basically
Columbia 3L