Law School Discussion

Looking for schools with solid Employment/Labor Law curriculums

Hi guys,

Enough talk about my boobs and bootie for one day and onto serious convo. I am looking for Employment/Labor Law programs similar to the one at Cleveland State but I can't find a way to search for school's strengths and concentrations. Any suggestions. The USNWR site doesn't list it as a concentration and the LSAC doesn't mention it either.

And I'm talking all tiers.

Thanks.

awesomepossum

  • ****
  • 866
  • Playing possum can go too far
    • View Profile
Re: Looking for schools with solid Employment/Labor Law curriculums
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2007, 02:12:27 PM »
Ask Jolie on the Michigan thread.  This is her forte.

Re: Looking for schools with solid Employment/Labor Law curriculums
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2007, 02:28:09 PM »
Ask Jolie on the Michigan thread.  This is her forte.

thanks for that AP but you're going to have to help me out with the right thread. A search for Michigan gives me 12 pages and a search for Jolie gives me five. Is there a particular area  you're speaking of?

awesomepossum

  • ****
  • 866
  • Playing possum can go too far
    • View Profile
Re: Looking for schools with solid Employment/Labor Law curriculums
« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2007, 02:30:37 PM »
I'll PM you

Re: Looking for schools with solid Employment/Labor Law curriculums
« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2007, 10:20:36 AM »
There's a list of schools with certificates here, see "Specialized Programs" on right-hand side-http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/laborprof_blog/

Cornell, Illinois, Wisconsin, UPenn, Hofstra, Hamline, St. John's, Northeastern, WVU and Buffalo also have good labor classes/faculty.  I'm going into labor law myself (2L interning at a union now), so PM me if you have any more questions.

Re: Looking for schools with solid Employment/Labor Law curriculums
« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2007, 10:24:39 AM »
kent has a L&E program and a clinic (I think mostly if not entirely plaintiff side)

marquette has a specialty L&E option too


Re: Looking for schools with solid Employment/Labor Law curriculums
« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2007, 11:56:45 AM »
There's a list of schools with certificates here, see "Specialized Programs" on right-hand side-http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/laborprof_blog/

Cornell, Illinois, Wisconsin, UPenn, Hofstra, Hamline, St. John's, Northeastern, WVU and Buffalo also have good labor classes/faculty.  I'm going into labor law myself (2L interning at a union now), so PM me if you have any more questions.

This was hugely beneficial. Thanks! may I ask where you attend? And what are your opinions of such focused programs - worth it or do you get the same amount of exposure going to a solid school and interning?

And I'd love to hear more about your union experience. That's one of the things on my "list".

Re: Looking for schools with solid Employment/Labor Law curriculums
« Reply #8 on: June 29, 2007, 03:01:35 PM »
Whether or not a school had a labor concentration was one of the biggest things I looked for when I was deciding on which law schools to apply to.  I think the focused programs are generally a great thing, but you do have to look at the curriculum closely.  There are some schools that have a "concentration" in just about everything.  I would suggest looking at seeing how many employment electives there are, whether or not there's a labor journal/club, and whether they have professors that are prominent in the field (also important for networking).

I'm not quite sure if you'd get the same thing out of "going to a solid school and interning" (partly because you can't guarantee that your internships will be in the field), but you also need to compare the overall qualities of the schools, cost of tuition, and geography.  If you already have substantial, relevant experience (ex. HR manager or union rep), it may be of less value to you.

Also, many schools don't have "focused programs" per se (like many of those I listed on my last post), but still have the same range of classes and faculty without a formal specialization.  So...you really do need to take a lot into consideration besides USNWR ranking and whether or not they have a formal specialty.